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Results: 1 to 20 of 66

1.

Inhibition

MedGen UID:
5809
Concept ID:
C0021469
Molecular Function
2.

Sezary syndrome

Sézary syndrome is an aggressive form of a type of cancer called cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas occur when certain immune cells, called T cells, become cancerous; these cancers characteristically affect the skin, causing different types of skin lesions. In Sézary syndrome, the cancerous T cells are called Sézary cells and are found in the skin, lymph nodes, and blood. A characteristic of Sézary cells is an abnormally shaped nucleus, described as cerebriform. People with Sézary syndrome develop a red, severely itchy rash (erythroderma) that covers large portions of their body. Sézary cells are found in the rash. However, the skin cells themselves are not cancerous; the skin problems result when Sézary cells move from the blood into the skin. People with Sézary syndrome also have enlarged lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy). Other common signs and symptoms of this condition include hair loss (alopecia), thickened skin on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet (palmoplantar keratoderma), abnormalities of the fingernails and toenails, and lower eyelids that turn outward (ectropion). Some people with Sézary syndrome are less able to control their body temperature than people without the condition. The cancerous T cells can spread to other organs in the body, including the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow. In addition, affected individuals have an increased risk of developing another lymphoma or other type of cancer. Sézary syndrome occurs in adults over age 60 and progresses rapidly; historically, affected individuals survived an average of 2 to 4 years after development of the condition, although survival has improved with newer treatments. Although Sézary syndrome is sometimes referred to as a variant of another cutaneous T-cell lymphoma called mycosis fungoides, these two cancers are generally considered separate conditions.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
19959
Concept ID:
C0036920
Neoplastic Process
3.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Mycosis fungoides

Mycosis fungoides is a malignant T-cell lymphoma of the skin, first reported (and named) by Alibert (1835). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
7771
Concept ID:
C0026948
Neoplastic Process
5.

Detected

MedGen UID:
617726
Concept ID:
C0442726
Finding
6.

PD 0325901

A synthetic, organic, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) inhibitor with potential antineoplastic activity. PD325901 selectively binds to and inhibits MEK, thereby preventing phosphorylation and activation of MAPKs 1 and 2, which may result in inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. MEK is phosphorylated and activated by Raf. Check for "http://www.cancer.gov/Search/ClinicalTrialsLink.aspx?id=456780&idtype=1" active clinical trials or "http://www.cancer.gov/Search/ClinicalTrialsLink.aspx?id=456780&idtype=1&closed=1" closed clinical trials using this agent. ("http://nciterms.nci.nih.gov:80/NCIBrowser/ConceptReport.jsp?dictionary=NCI_Thesaurus&code=C52195" NCI Thesaurus) [from PDQ]

MedGen UID:
302405
Concept ID:
C1675748
Pharmacologic Substance
7.

Mutant

An altered form of an individual, organism, population, or genetic character that differs from the corresponding wild type due to one or more alterations (mutations). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
109303
Concept ID:
C0596988
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
8.

Mycosis

If you have ever had athlete's foot or a yeast infection, you can blame a fungus. A fungus is a primitive organism. Mushrooms, mold and mildew are examples. Fungi live in air, in soil, on plants and in water. Some live in the human body. Only about half of all types of fungi are harmful. Some fungi reproduce through tiny spores in the air. You can inhale the spores or they can land on you. As a result, fungal infections often start in the lungs or on the skin. You are more likely to get a fungal infection if you have a weakened immune system or take antibiotics. Fungi can be difficult to kill. For skin and nail infections, you can apply medicine directly to the infected area. Oral antifungal medicines are also available for serious infections. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6486
Concept ID:
C0026946
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Amino acid

One of several molecules that join together to form proteins. There are 20 common amino acids found in proteins. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
250
Concept ID:
C0002520
Pharmacologic Substance
10.

Lymphosarcoma

An antiquated term referring to non-Hodgkin lymphomas composed of small and medium sized lymphocytes. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
811370
Concept ID:
C3714542
Neoplastic Process
11.

Protein Kinase Inhibitors

Any substance that inhibits protein kinase, an enzyme that catalyzes the addition of a phosphate group to a protein and is active in many diverse signaling pathways. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
260581
Concept ID:
C1449702
Pharmacologic Substance
12.

Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action

Pharmacological activities at the molecular level of DRUGS and other exogenous compounds that are used to treat DISEASES and affect normal BIOCHEMISTRY. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
226255
Concept ID:
C1258062
Molecular Function
13.

Lymphatism

MedGen UID:
141817
Concept ID:
C0524631
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Lymphadenopathy

A clinical finding indicating that a lymph node is enlarged. Causes include viral and bacterial infections and cancers that affect the lymph nodes. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
96929
Concept ID:
C0497156
Finding
15.

T-cell lymphoma

A group of heterogeneous lymphoid tumors representing malignant transformations of T-lymphocytes. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
86957
Concept ID:
C0079772
Neoplastic Process
16.

Diffuse non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, undifferentiated

MedGen UID:
44226
Concept ID:
C0024306
Neoplastic Process
17.

Mixed Cell Lymphoma

MedGen UID:
44225
Concept ID:
C0024304
Neoplastic Process
18.

Lymphoma

Lymphoma is a cancer of a part of the immune system called the lymphatic system. There are many types of lymphoma. One type is called Hodgkin disease. The rest are called non-Hodgkin lymphoma. . Non-Hodgkin lymphomas begin when a type of white blood cell, called a T cell or B cell, becomes abnormal. The cell divides again and again, making more and more abnormal cells. These abnormal cells can spread to almost any other part of the body. Most of the time, doctors can't determine why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. . Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as : -Swollen, painless lymph nodes in the neck, armpits or groin. -Unexplained weight loss . -Fever . -Soaking night sweats . -Coughing, trouble breathing or chest pain . -Weakness and tiredness that don't go away . -Pain, swelling or a feeling of fullness in the abdomen . Your doctor will perform an exam and lab tests to determine if you have lymphoma. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44223
Concept ID:
C0024299
Neoplastic Process
19.

Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma

An antiquated term referring to non-Hodgkin lymphomas with a mixed cellular composition. This term applies to both B- and T- cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
42542
Concept ID:
C0079757
Neoplastic Process
20.

Low Grade Lymphoma

A type of lymphoma that tends to grow and spread slowly, and has few symptoms. Also called indolent lymphoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
42540
Concept ID:
C0079747
Neoplastic Process

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