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Items: 10

1.

Baldness, male pattern

Androgenetic alopecia is characterized by a loss of hair from the scalp that follows a defined pattern (Hamilton, 1951). It occurs in women as well as in men. It is caused by a shortening of the anagen (growth) phase and miniaturization of the hair follicle, which results in the formation of progressively thinner, shorter hair (Bergfeld, 1995). In men, the condition is often referred to as male pattern baldness (MPB) and appears to be androgen-dependent (Hamilton, 1942). The condition is hereditary, and follows a pattern that may be consistent with an autosomal dominant trait (Osborn, 1916). Linkage evidence for an autosomal locus on 3q26 (AGA1) has been identified (Hillmer et al., 2008). See 300710 (AGA2) for a discussion of X linkage of androgenetic alopecia. A third locus has been found on chromosome 20p11 (AGA3; 612421). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
56404
Concept ID:
C0162311
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Alopecia

You lose up to 100 hairs from your scalp every day. That's normal, and in most people, those hairs grow back. But many men -- and some women -- lose hair as they grow older. You can also lose your hair if you have certain diseases, such as thyroid problems, diabetes, or lupus. If you take certain medicines or have chemotherapy for cancer, you may also lose your hair. Other causes are stress, a low protein diet, a family history, or poor nutrition. . Treatment for hair loss depends on the cause. In some cases, treating the underlying cause will correct the problem. Other treatments include medicines and hair restoration. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7982
Concept ID:
C0002170
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
3.

Thyroid hormone plasma membrane transport defect

MedGen UID:
396060
Concept ID:
C1861101
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Alopecia of scalp

MedGen UID:
348030
Concept ID:
C1860137
Finding
5.

Hypotrichosis

Congenital lack of hair growth. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
6993
Concept ID:
C0020678
Congenital Abnormality; Finding; Finding
6.

Hypotrichosis 2

Hypotrichosis simplex can affect all body hair or be limited to the scalp. Usually patients with the scalp-limited form of hypotrichosis present with normal hair at birth; they experience a progressive, gradual loss of scalp hair beginning at the middle of the first decade and leading to almost complete loss of scalp hair by the third decade. A few sparse, fine, short hairs remain in some individuals. Body hair, beard, eyebrows, axillary hair, teeth, and nails develop normally. Light and electron microscopy of hairs from early hypotrichosis simplex revealed no structural changes, whereas hairs from patients with advanced hypotrichosis showed focal areas of defective cuticular structure. Men and women are equally affected (summary by Betz et al., 2000). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nonsyndromic hypotrichosis, see 605389. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
374435
Concept ID:
C1840299
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Hypotrichosis of the scalp

Reduced or lacking hair growth of the scalp. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
362627
Concept ID:
C1873509
Finding
8.

Sparse scalp hair

Decreased number of head hairs per unit area. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
346499
Concept ID:
C1857042
Finding
9.

Aplasia cutis congenita of scalp

A developmental defect resulting in the congenital absence of skin on the scalp. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
343411
Concept ID:
C1855698
Congenital Abnormality; Finding
10.

Scarring alopecia of scalp

MedGen UID:
341656
Concept ID:
C1856946
Finding
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