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Items: 6

1.

Poor prognosis

MedGen UID:
548766
Concept ID:
C0278252
Finding
2.

Primary cortisol resistance

MedGen UID:
443921
Concept ID:
C2930863
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Indifference to pain, congenital, autosomal recessive

Congenital indifference to pain is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the complete absence of pain perception typically associated with noxious stimuli. Affected individuals are aware of a stimulus, but have lost the ability to perceive pain. Most patients are hyposmic or anosmic. Other sensory modalities are unaffected, and there is an absence of overt autonomic symptoms. Sural nerve biopsy and nerve conduction velocity studies are normal (summary by Cox et al., 2006; and Goldberg et al., 2012). Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IID (HSAN2D) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital or childhood-onset distal loss of pain and temperature sensation as well as autonomic dysfunction accompanied by hyposmia, hearing loss, hypogeusia, and sometimes bone dysplasia. The phenotype is highly variable, even within families. Two Japanese families have been reported (summary by Yuan et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HSAN, see HSAN1 (162400). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
344563
Concept ID:
C1855739
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Rett syndrome

MECP2-related disorders in females include classic Rett syndrome, variant Rett syndrome, and mild learning disabilities. A pathogenic MECP2 variant in a male is presumed to most often be lethal; phenotypes in rare surviving males are primarily severe neonatal encephalopathy and manic-depressive psychosis, pyramidal signs, Parkinsonian, and macro-orchidism (PPM-X syndrome). Classic Rett syndrome, a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting girls, is characterized by apparently normal psychomotor development during the first six to 18 months of life, followed by a short period of developmental stagnation, then rapid regression in language and motor skills, followed by long-term stability. During the phase of rapid regression, repetitive, stereotypic hand movements replace purposeful hand use. Additional findings include fits of screaming and inconsolable crying, autistic features, panic-like attacks, bruxism, episodic apnea and/or hyperpnea, gait ataxia and apraxia, tremors, seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Atypical Rett syndrome is observed increasingly as MECP2 variants are identified in individuals previously diagnosed with: clinically suspected but molecularly unconfirmed Angelman syndrome; intellectual disability with spasticity or tremor; mild learning disability; or (rarely) autism. Severe neonatal encephalopathy resulting in death before age two years is the most common phenotype observed in affected males. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
48441
Concept ID:
C0035372
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Polyarteritis nodosa

Childhood-onset polyarteritis nodosa is an autosomal recessive systemic vascular inflammatory disorder characterized mainly by involvement of the skin, nervous system, kidney, and gastrointestinal tract. There is considerable variability in the severity and age at onset, although most patients have onset of symptoms in the first decade. Features include recurrent ischemic stroke affecting the small vessels of the brain and resulting in neurologic dysfunction, recurrent fever, elevated acute-phase proteins, myalgias, and livedo racemosa or reticularis with an inflammatory vasculitis on biopsy. Some patients develop hypertension, aneurysms, or ischemic necrosis of the digits (summary by Zhou et al., 2014 and Navon Elkan et al., 2014). Some patients present with clinical immunodeficiency van Eyck et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
14681
Concept ID:
C0031036
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Rothmund-Thomson syndrome

Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) is characterized by poikiloderma; sparse hair, eyelashes, and/or eyebrows; small stature; skeletal and dental abnormalities; cataracts; and an increased risk for cancer, especially osteosarcoma. The skin is typically normal at birth; the rash of RTS develops between age three and six months as erythema, swelling, and blistering on the face and subsequently spreads to the buttocks and extremities. The rash evolves over months to years into the chronic pattern of reticulated hypo- and hyperpigmentation, punctate atrophy, and telangiectasias, collectively known as poikiloderma. Hyperkeratotic lesions occur in approximately one third of individuals. Skeletal abnormalities include radial ray defects, ulnar defects, absent or hypoplastic patella, and osteopenia. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
10819
Concept ID:
C0032339
Disease or Syndrome
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