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Items: 8

1.

Sarcoma

Your soft tissues connect, support, or surround other tissues. Examples include your muscles, tendons, fat, and blood vessels. Soft tissue sarcoma is a cancer of these soft tissues. There are many kinds, based on the type of tissue they started in. They may cause a lump or swelling in the soft tissue. Sometimes they spread and can press on nerves and organs, causing problems such as pain or trouble breathing. No one knows exactly what causes these cancers. They are not common, but you have a higher risk if you have been exposed to certain chemicals, have had radiation therapy, or have certain genetic diseases. Doctors diagnose soft tissue sarcomas with a biopsy. Treatments include surgery to remove the tumor, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
224714
Concept ID:
C1261473
Neoplastic Process
2.

Kaposi sarcoma

A systemic disease which can present with cutaneous lesions with or without internal involvement. Tumors are caused by Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
833575
Concept ID:
CN117617
Finding
3.

Sarcoma

A connective tissue neoplasm formed by proliferation of mesodermal cells. Bone and soft tissue sarcomas are the main types of sarcoma. Sarcoma is usually highly malignant. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506452
Concept ID:
CN117138
Finding
4.

Classic Kaposi sarcoma

Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is an invasive angioproliferative inflammatory condition that occurs commonly in men infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; see 609423). In the early stages of KS, lesions appear reactive and are stimulated to grow by the actions of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. In the late stages of KS, a malignant phenotype that appears to be monoclonal can develop. Infection with human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8), also known as KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is necessary but not sufficient for KS development. Coinfection with HIV markedly increases the likelihood of KS development, and additional environmental, hormonal, and genetic cofactors likely contribute to its pathogenesis (summary by Foster et al., 2000). Suthaus et al. (2012) noted that HHV-8 is the etiologic agent not only of KS, but also of primary effusion lymphoma and plasma cell-type multicentric Castleman disease (MCD). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
11321
Concept ID:
C0036220
Neoplastic Process
5.

Lymphoma

Lymphoma is a cancer of a part of the immune system called the lymph system. There are many types of lymphoma. One type is Hodgkin disease. The rest are called non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas begin when a type of white blood cell, called a T cell or B cell, becomes abnormal. The cell divides again and again, making more and more abnormal cells. These abnormal cells can spread to almost any other part of the body. Most of the time, doctors don't know why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. You are at increased risk if you have a weakened immune system or have certain types of infections. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as . -Swollen, painless lymph nodes in the neck, armpits or groin. -Unexplained weight loss . -Fever . -Soaking night sweats . -Coughing, trouble breathing or chest pain . -Weakness and tiredness that don't go away . -Pain, swelling or a feeling of fullness in the abdomen . Your doctor will diagnose lymphoma with a physical exam, blood tests, a chest x-ray, and a biopsy. Treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, biological therapy, or therapy to remove proteins from the blood. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. If you don't have symptoms, you may not need treatment right away. This is called watchful waiting. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44223
Concept ID:
C0024299
Neoplastic Process
6.

Castleman disease

Castleman disease (CD) is a benign lymphoproliferative disorder that may present as a localized or multicentric form (see these terms). The clinical manifestations are heterogeneous, ranging from asymptomatic discrete lymphadenopathy to recurrent episodes of diffuse lymphadenopathy with severe systemic symptoms. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
798004
Concept ID:
CN199886
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Lymphoproliferative disorder

MedGen UID:
505822
Concept ID:
CN004892
Finding
8.

Lymphoma

A cancer originating in lymphocytes and presenting as a solid tumor of lymhpoid cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505322
Concept ID:
CN002422
Finding
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