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Items: 17

1.

Rotor syndrome

Rotor syndrome is characterized by mild conjugated and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia which usually begins shortly after birth or in childhood. Jaundice may be intermittent. Conjunctival icterus may be the only clinical manifestation. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
67435
Concept ID:
C0220991
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Hyperbilirubinemia

A condition characterized by an abnormal increase of BILIRUBIN in the blood, which may result in JAUNDICE. Bilirubin, a breakdown product of HEME, is normally excreted in the BILE or further catabolized before excretion in the urine. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
6962
Concept ID:
C0020433
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
3.

Hyperbilirubinemia

An increased amount of bilirubin in the blood. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
86321
Concept ID:
C0311468
Finding
4.

Najjar syndrome

Mental retardation with genital anomalies and cardiomyopathy. [from MCA/MR]

MedGen UID:
167104
Concept ID:
C0796083
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Crigler Najjar syndrome, type 1

Crigler-Najjar syndrome is a severe condition characterized by high levels of a toxic substance called bilirubin in the blood (hyperbilirubinemia). Bilirubin is produced when red blood cells are broken down. This substance is removed from the body only after it undergoes a chemical reaction in the liver, which converts the toxic form of bilirubin (called unconjugated bilirubin) to a nontoxic form called conjugated bilirubin. People with Crigler-Najjar syndrome have a buildup of unconjugated bilirubin in their blood (unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia).Bilirubin has an orange-yellow tint, and hyperbilirubinemia causes yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice). In Crigler-Najjar syndrome, jaundice is apparent at birth or in infancy. Severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia can lead to a condition called kernicterus, which is a form of brain damage caused by the accumulation of unconjugated bilirubin in the brain and nerve tissues. Babies with kernicterus are often extremely tired (lethargic) and may have weak muscle tone (hypotonia). These babies may experience episodes of increased muscle tone (hypertonia) and arching of their backs. Kernicterus can lead to other neurological problems, including involuntary writhing movements of the body (choreoathetosis), hearing problems, or intellectual disability.Crigler-Najjar syndrome is divided into two types. Type 1 (CN1) is very severe, and affected individuals can die in childhood due to kernicterus, although with proper treatment, they may survive longer. Type 2 (CN2) is less severe. People with CN2 are less likely to develop kernicterus, and most affected individuals survive into adulthood.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
41346
Concept ID:
C0010324
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia

An increased amount of unconjugated (indirect) bilurubin in the blood. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506201
Concept ID:
CN007281
Finding
7.

Crigler-Najjar syndrome

Crigler-Najjar syndrome is a severe condition characterized by high levels of a toxic substance called bilirubin in the blood (hyperbilirubinemia). Bilirubin is produced when red blood cells are broken down. This substance is removed from the body only after it undergoes a chemical reaction in the liver, which converts the toxic form of bilirubin (called unconjugated bilirubin) to a nontoxic form called conjugated bilirubin. People with Crigler-Najjar syndrome have a buildup of unconjugated bilirubin in their blood (unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia).Bilirubin has an orange-yellow tint, and hyperbilirubinemia causes yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice). In Crigler-Najjar syndrome, jaundice is apparent at birth or in infancy. Severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia can lead to a condition called kernicterus, which is a form of brain damage caused by the accumulation of unconjugated bilirubin in the brain and nerve tissues. Babies with kernicterus are often extremely tired (lethargic) and may have weak muscle tone (hypotonia). These babies may experience episodes of increased muscle tone (hypertonia) and arching of their backs. Kernicterus can lead to other neurological problems, including involuntary writhing movements of the body (choreoathetosis), hearing problems, or intellectual disability.Crigler-Najjar syndrome is divided into two types. Type 1 (CN1) is very severe, and affected individuals can die in childhood due to kernicterus, although with proper treatment, they may survive longer. Type 2 (CN2) is less severe. People with CN2 are less likely to develop kernicterus, and most affected individuals survive into adulthood.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
468484
Concept ID:
CN119421
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Malouf syndrome

Mental retardation, ovarian dysgenesis, congestive cardiomyopathy, broad nasal base, blepharoptosis, and bone abnormalities. The phenotype varies and not all features are present in individual cases. Occasional marfanoid habitus (tall stature with long and thin limbs, little subcutaneous fat, arachnodactyly, joint hyperextensibility, narrow face, small chin, large testes, and hypotonia). [from MCA/MR]

MedGen UID:
162901
Concept ID:
C0796031
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia

An increased amount of unconjugated (indirect) bilurubin in the blood. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
82786
Concept ID:
C0268306
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia

A type of hyperbilirubinemia with neonatal onset. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
208991
Concept ID:
C0857007
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
Organism Attribute
13.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Dubin-Johnson syndrome

Dubin-Johnson syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by conjugated hyperbilirubinemia, an increase in the urinary excretion of coproporphyrin isomer I, deposition of melanin-like pigment in hepatocytes, and prolonged retention of sulfobromophthalein, but otherwise normal liver function (summary by Wada et al., 1998). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
7181
Concept ID:
C0022350
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Neonatal jaundice

Neonatal jaundice refers to a yellowing of the skin and other tissues of a newborn infant as a result of increased concentrations of bilirubin in the blood. Neonatal jaundice affects over half of all newborns to some extent in the first week of life. Prolonged neonatal jaundice is said to be present if the jaundice persists for longer than 14 days in term infants and 21 days in preterm infants. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
5923
Concept ID:
C0022353
Disease or Syndrome; Sign or Symptom
16.

Gilbert syndrome

The hereditary hyperbilirubinemias (Wolkoff et al., 1983) include (1) those resulting in predominantly unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia: Gilbert or Arias syndrome, Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I (218800), and Crigler-Najjar syndrome type II (606785); and (2) those resulting in predominantly conjugated hyperbilirubinemia: Dubin-Johnson syndrome (237500), Rotor syndrome (237450), and several forms of intrahepatic cholestasis (147480, 211600, 214950, 243300). Detailed studies show that patients with Gilbert syndrome have reduced activity of bilirubin glucuronosyltransferase (Bosma et al., 1995, Koiwai et al., 1995). Genetic Heterogeneity of Hyperbilirubinemia See also Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I (HBLRCN1; 218800), Crigler-Najjar syndrome type II (HBLRCN2; 606785), and transient familial neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (HBLRTFN; 237900), all caused by mutation in the UGT1A1 gene (191740) on chromosome 2q37; Dubin-Johnson syndrome (DJS, HBLRDJ; 237500), caused by mutation in the ABCC2 gene (601107) on chromosome 10q24; and Rotor syndrome (HBLRR; 237450), caused by digenic mutation in the SLCO1B1 (604843) and SLCOB3 (605495) genes, both on chromosome 12p. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
4891
Concept ID:
C0017551
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Gilbert syndrome, susceptibility to

MedGen UID:
433613
Concept ID:
CN069677
Disease or Syndrome
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