Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

MedGen for PubMed (Select 20627642)

Items: 16

1.

Peripheral neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy is a general term for any disorder of the peripheral nervous system. The main clinical features used to classify peripheral neuropathy are distribution, type (mainly demyelinating versus mainly axonal), duration, and course. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506330
Concept ID:
CN008687
Finding
2.

Optic neuropathy

MedGen UID:
504742
Concept ID:
CN001070
Finding
3.

Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial neurodegenerative disease affecting the optic nerve and often characterized by sudden vision loss in young adult carriers. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
797692
Concept ID:
CN197519
Finding
4.

Leber's optic atrophy

Mitochondrial diseases are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that arise as a result of dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be caused by mutation of genes encoded by either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). While some mitochondrial disorders only affect a single organ (e.g., the eye in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy [LHON]), many involve multiple organ systems and often present with prominent neurologic and myopathic features. Mitochondrial disorders may present at any age. Many individuals with a mutation of mtDNA display a cluster of clinical features that fall into a discrete clinical syndrome, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF), neurogenic weakness with ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP), or Leigh syndrome (LS). However, considerable clinical variability exists and many individuals do not fit neatly into one particular category, which is well-illustrated by the overlapping spectrum of disease phenotypes (including mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) resulting from mutation of the nuclear gene POLG, which has emerged as a major cause of mitochondrial disease. Common clinical features of mitochondrial disease – whether involving a mitochondrial or nuclear gene – include ptosis, external ophthalmoplegia, proximal myopathy and exercise intolerance, cardiomyopathy, sensorineural deafness, optic atrophy, pigmentary retinopathy, and diabetes mellitus. Common central nervous system findings are fluctuating encephalopathy, seizures, dementia, migraine, stroke-like episodes, ataxia, and spasticity. A high incidence of mid- and late pregnancy loss is a common occurrence that often goes unrecognized. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
182973
Concept ID:
C0917796
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Visual impairment

Vision considered to be inferior to normal vision as represented by accepted standards of acuity, field of vision, or motility. Low vision generally refers to visual disorders that are caused by diseases that cannot be corrected by refraction (e.g., MACULAR DEGENERATION; RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA; DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, etc.). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
22663
Concept ID:
C0042798
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
6.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Mitochondrial diseases

Mitochondrial diseases are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that arise as a result of dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be caused by mutation of genes encoded by either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). While some mitochondrial disorders only affect a single organ (e.g., the eye in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy [LHON]), many involve multiple organ systems and often present with prominent neurologic and myopathic features. Mitochondrial disorders may present at any age. Many individuals with a mutation of mtDNA display a cluster of clinical features that fall into a discrete clinical syndrome, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF), neurogenic weakness with ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP), or Leigh syndrome (LS). However, considerable clinical variability exists and many individuals do not fit neatly into one particular category, which is well-illustrated by the overlapping spectrum of disease phenotypes (including mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) resulting from mutation of the nuclear gene POLG, which has emerged as a major cause of mitochondrial disease. Common clinical features of mitochondrial disease – whether involving a mitochondrial or nuclear gene – include ptosis, external ophthalmoplegia, proximal myopathy and exercise intolerance, cardiomyopathy, sensorineural deafness, optic atrophy, pigmentary retinopathy, and diabetes mellitus. Common central nervous system findings are fluctuating encephalopathy, seizures, dementia, migraine, stroke-like episodes, ataxia, and spasticity. A high incidence of mid- and late pregnancy loss is a common occurrence that often goes unrecognized. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
155901
Concept ID:
C0751651
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Hereditary eye diseases

Transmission of gene defects or chromosomal aberrations/abnormalities which are expressed in extreme variation in the structure or function of the eye. These may be evident at birth, but may be manifested later with progression of the disorder. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
41933
Concept ID:
C0015398
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Optic atrophy

A disorder characterized by loss of optic nerve fibers. It may be inherited or acquired. Acquired causes include ischemia, optic nerve neuropathy, glaucoma, trauma, radiation, brain tumors, and multiple sclerosis. It leads to vision disturbances. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
18180
Concept ID:
C0029124
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Optic atrophy 7

MedGen UID:
414112
Concept ID:
C2751812
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Optic atrophy 5

MedGen UID:
377837
Concept ID:
C1853139
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Clinical modifier

This subontology is designed to provide terms to characterize and specify the phenotypic abnormalities defined in the Phenotypic abnormality subontology, with respect to severity, laterality, age of onset, and other aspects. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
786386
Concept ID:
CN188744
Finding
14.

Leber optic atrophy

Degeneration of retinal ganglion cells and their axons. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504730
Concept ID:
CN001044
Finding
15.

Leber optic atrophy, susceptibility to

MedGen UID:
374333
Concept ID:
C1839891
Finding
16.

Leber hereditary optic neuropathy with dystonia

MedGen UID:
333240
Concept ID:
C1839040
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...