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Items: 13

1.

Obesity

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. The weight may come from muscle, bone, fat, and/or body water. Both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what's considered healthy for his or her height. . Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories than you use. The balance between calories-in and calories-out differs for each person. Factors that might affect your weight include your genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods, and not being physically active. . Being obese increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and some cancers. If you are obese, losing even 5 to 10 percent of your weight can delay or prevent some of these diseases. For example, that means losing 10 to 20 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
18127
Concept ID:
C0028754
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Obesity

MedGen UID:
368429
Concept ID:
C1963185
Finding
3.

Increased body weight

A change in overall body weight, relative to the beginning of the collection period. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
12145
Concept ID:
C0043094
Finding
4.

Hypertension

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is called diastolic pressure. . Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually the systolic number comes before or above the diastolic number. A reading of. -119/79 or lower is normal blood pressure. -140/90 or higher is high blood pressure. -Between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number is called prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure. You can control high blood pressure through healthy lifestyle habits and taking medicines, if needed. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6969
Concept ID:
C0020538
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Overweight

MedGen UID:
833104
Concept ID:
C2712048
Finding
6.

Hypertension

A finding of increased blood pressure; not necessarily hypertensive disorder [from SNOMED CT]

MedGen UID:
635666
Concept ID:
C0497247
Finding
7.

Abnormality of the cardiovascular system

Any abnormality of the cardiovascular system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
427888
Concept ID:
CN001481
Finding
8.

Disorder of cardiovascular system

Any abnormality of the cardiovascular system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2848
Concept ID:
C0007222
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
Organism Attribute
10.

Abdominal obesity

A condition of having excess fat in the abdomen. Abdominal obesity is typically defined as waist circumferences of 40 inches or more in men and 35 inches or more in women. Abdominal obesity raises the risk of developing disorders, such as diabetes, hypertension and METABOLIC SYNDROME X. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
90229
Concept ID:
C0311277
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Precocious puberty

The onset of secondary sexual characteristics before a normal age. Although it is difficult to define normal age ranges because of the marked variation with which puberty begins in normal children, precocious puberty can be defined as the onset of puberty before the age of 8 years in girls or 9 years in boys. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
18752
Concept ID:
C0034013
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
12.

Disorder of endocrine system

Your endocrine system includes eight major glands throughout your body. These glands make hormones. Hormones are chemical messengers. They travel through your bloodstream to tissues or organs. Hormones work slowly and affect body processes from head to toe. These include. -Growth and development. -Metabolism - digestion, elimination, breathing, blood circulation and maintaining body temperature . -Sexual function. -Reproduction. -Mood. If your hormone levels are too high or too low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Stress, infection and changes in your blood's fluid and electrolyte balance can also influence hormone levels. In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are usually treated by controlling how much hormone your body makes. Hormone supplements can help if the problem is too little of a hormone.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4043
Concept ID:
C0014130
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Puberty and gonadal disorders

MedGen UID:
446922
Concept ID:
CN007366
Finding
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