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Results: 1 to 20 of 21

1.

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a psychosis, a disorder of thought and sense of self. Although it affects emotions, it is distinguished from mood disorders in which such disturbances are primary. Similarly, there may be mild impairment of cognitive function, and it is distinguished from the dementias in which disturbed cognitive function is considered primary. There is no characteristic pathology, such as neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer disease (104300). Schizophrenia is a common disorder with a lifetime prevalence of approximately 1%. It is highly heritable but the genetics are complex. This may not be a single entity. Reviews In a review of schizophrenia, van Os and Kapur (2009) noted that in Japan the term schizophrenia was abandoned and the illness is now called integration-dysregulation syndrome. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
48574
Concept ID:
C0036341
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
2.

Bipolar disorder

Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness. People who have it go through unusual mood changes. They go from very happy, up, and active to very sad and hopeless, down, and inactive, and then back again. They often have normal moods in between. The up feeling is called mania. The down feeling is depression. The causes of bipolar disorder aren't always clear. It runs in families. Abnormal brain structure and function may also play a role. Bipolar disorder often starts in a person's late teen or early adult years. But children and adults can have bipolar disorder too. The illness usually lasts a lifetime. If you think you may have it, tell your health care provider. A medical checkup can rule out other illnesses that might cause your mood changes. If not treated, bipolar disorder can lead to damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide. However, there are effective treatments to control symptoms: medicine and talk therapy. A combination usually works best. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2649
Concept ID:
C0005586
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
3.

Related

MedGen UID:
619805
Concept ID:
C0445223
Finding
4.

Schizophrenia

A mental disorder characterized by a disintegration of thought processes and of emotional responsiveness. It most commonly manifests as auditory hallucinations, paranoid or bizarre delusions, or disorganized speech and thinking, and it is accompanied by significant social or occupational dysfunction. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in young adulthood, with a global lifetime prevalence of about 0.3-0.7%. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506532
Concept ID:
CN117643
Finding
5.

Primary cortisol resistance

MedGen UID:
443921
Concept ID:
C2930863
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Bipolar affective disorder

MedGen UID:
429095
Concept ID:
CN006388
Finding
7.

Anxiety

MedGen UID:
409544
Concept ID:
C1963064
Finding
8.

Major affective disorder 1

MedGen UID:
377615
Concept ID:
C1852197
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
9.

Anxiety

Human personality is shaped by genetic and environmental factors, and evidence suggests that the genetic component is highly complex, polygenic, and epistatic. Genetic factors are thought to contribute to 40 to 60% of trait variance. Molecular genetics has tried to identify specific genes for quantitative traits, called quantitative trait loci (QTLs). The QTL concept suggests that complex personality traits or dimensions are not attributable to single genes, but to multiple interacting genes (Reif and Lesch, 2003). Fullerton et al. (2003) stated that psychologists were in agreement that the wide variation in human personalities can be explained by a small number of personality factors, including neuroticism (a measure of emotional stability), which manifests at one extreme as anxiety, depression, moodiness, low self-esteem, and diffidence. They cited a number of studies that had described a relationship between high scores on measures of neuroticism and major depressive disorder. They also noted that theoretical studies had suggested that large samples of randomly ascertained sibs could be used to ascertain phenotypically extreme individuals and thereby increase power to detect genetic linkage in complex traits. See also panic disorder (PAND1; 167870), which is a subtype of anxiety disorder. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
335849
Concept ID:
C1842981
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Disease Attributes

Clinical characteristics of disease or illness. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
199876
Concept ID:
C0752357
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Schizophrenia and Disorders with Psychotic Features

Marked disorders of thought (delusions, hallucinations, or other thought disorder accompanied by disordered affect or behavior), and deterioration from a previous level of functioning. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
141907
Concept ID:
C0525046
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
12.

Diagnosis, Psychiatric

MedGen UID:
138165
Concept ID:
C0376338
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
13.

Mania

Excitement of psychotic proportions manifested by mental and physical hyperactivity, disorganisation of behaviour and elevation of mood. (On-line Medical Dictionary) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
137909
Concept ID:
C0338831
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
14.

Mood disorder

Most people feel sad or irritable from time to time. They may say they're in a bad mood. A mood disorder is different. It affects a person's everyday emotional state. Nearly one in ten people aged 18 and older have mood disorders. These include. -Major depressive disorder. -Dysthymic disorder (a chronic, mild depression). -Bipolar disorder (also called manic depression). . Mood disorders can increase a person's risk for heart disease, diabetes, and other diseases. Treatments include medication, psychotherapy, or a combination of both. With treatment, most people with mood disorders can lead productive lives.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
99866
Concept ID:
C0525045
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
15.

Pathologic Processes

The abnormal mechanisms and forms involved in the dysfunctions of tissues and organs. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
18325
Concept ID:
C0030660
Pathologic Function
16.

Behavioral Symptoms

Observable manifestations of impaired psychological functioning. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
14048
Concept ID:
C0004941
Sign or Symptom
17.

Mental disorder

Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including: -Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and phobias. -Bipolar disorder. -Depression. -Mood disorders. -Personality disorders. -Psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia. There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play a role. Your life experiences, such as stress or a history of abuse, may also matter. Biological factors can also be part of the cause. A traumatic brain injury can lead to a mental disorder. A mother's exposure to viruses or toxic chemicals while pregnant may play a part. Other factors may increase your risk, such as use of illegal drugs or having a serious medical condition like cancer. Medications and counseling can help many mental disorders. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14047
Concept ID:
C0004936
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
18.

Mental Depression

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life. Symptoms can include : -Sadness. -Loss of interest or pleasure in activities you used to enjoy. -Change in weight. -Difficulty sleeping or oversleeping. -Energy loss. -Feelings of worthlessness. -Thoughts of death or suicide. Depression is a disorder of the brain. There are a variety of causes, including genetic, environmental, psychological, and biochemical factors. Depression usually starts between the ages of 15 and 30, and is much more common in women. Women can also get postpartum depression after the birth of a baby. Some people get seasonal affective disorder in the winter. Depression is one part of bipolar disorder. There are effective treatments for depression, including antidepressants and talk therapy. Most people do best by using both. . NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8325
Concept ID:
C0011570
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
19.

Affective psychosis

Disorders in which the essential feature is a severe disturbance in mood (depression, anxiety, elation, and excitement) accompanied by psychotic symptoms such as delusions, hallucinations, gross impairment in reality testing, etc. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7916
Concept ID:
C0001723
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
20.

Reactive depressive psychosis

MedGen UID:
4228
Concept ID:
C0011580
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction

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