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Results: 7

1.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder

A disorder characterized by the presence of persistent and recurrent irrational thoughts (obsessions), resulting in marked anxiety and repetitive excessive behaviors (compulsions) as a way to try to decrease that anxiety. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
14445
Concept ID:
C0028768
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
2.

Bipolar disorder

Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness. People who have it experience dramatic mood swings. They may go from overly energetic, "high" and/or irritable, to sad and hopeless, and then back again. They often have normal moods in between. The up feeling is called mania. The down feeling is depression. Bipolar disorder can run in families. It usually starts in late adolescence or early adulthood. If you think you may have it, tell your health care provider. A medical checkup can rule out other illnesses that might cause your mood changes. Untreated, bipolar disorder can result in damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide. However, there are effective treatments: medicines and "talk therapy". A combination usually works best. . NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2649
Concept ID:
C0005586
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
3.

Obsessive-compulsive behavior

Recurrent obsessions or compulsions that are severe enough to be time consuming (i.e., they take more than 1 hour a day) or cause marked distress or significant impairment (DSM-IV). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504572
Concept ID:
CN000679
Finding
4.

Bipolar affective disorder

MedGen UID:
429095
Concept ID:
CN006388
Finding
5.

Major affective disorder 1

MedGen UID:
377615
Concept ID:
C1852197
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
6.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by recurring obsessions and/or compulsions and has been estimated to affect nearly 5 million people in the United States (Karno et al., 1988). Evidence for a strong genetic component in OCD comes from twin studies, family genetics studies, and segregation analyses, as reviewed by Alsobrook et al. (2002). Zhang et al. (2002) suggested that hoarding is likely to be an evolutionarily conserved trait that, in times of adversity, was associated with increased survival and reproductive fitness. However, extreme forms of this trait are associated with marked disability and poor response to treatment (Black et al., 1998; Mataix-Cols et al., 1999). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
320254
Concept ID:
C1834037
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Obsessional thoughts

MedGen UID:
115928
Concept ID:
C0233697
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction

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