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Results: 1 to 20 of 69

1.

Malignant tumor of prostate

The prostate is the gland below a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare in men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family history, being African-American, and some genetic changes. Symptoms of prostate cancer may include: -Problems passing urine, such as pain, difficulty starting or stopping the stream, or dribbling. -Low back pain. -Pain with ejaculation. Your doctor will diagnose prostate cancer by feeling the prostate through the wall of the rectum or doing a blood test for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Other tests include ultrasound, x-rays, or a biopsy. Treatment often depends on the stage of the cancer. How fast the cancer grows and how different it is from surrounding tissue helps determine the stage. Men with prostate cancer have many treatment options. The treatment that's best for one man may not be best for another. The options include watchful waiting, surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. You may have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
138169
Concept ID:
C0376358
Neoplastic Process
2.

Age-related macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration is an eye disease that is a leading cause of vision loss in older people in developed countries. The vision loss usually becomes noticeable in a person's sixties or seventies and tends to worsen over time. Age-related macular degeneration mainly affects central vision, which is needed for detailed tasks such as reading, driving, and recognizing faces. The vision loss in this condition results from a gradual deterioration of light-sensing cells in the tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color (the retina). Specifically, age-related macular degeneration affects a small area near the center of the retina, called the macula, which is responsible for central vision. Side (peripheral) vision and night vision are generally not affected. Researchers have described two major types of age-related macular degeneration, known as the dry form and the wet form. The dry form is much more common, accounting for 85 to 90 percent of all cases of age-related macular degeneration. It is characterized by a buildup of yellowish deposits called drusen beneath the retina and slowly progressive vision loss. The condition typically affects vision in both eyes, although vision loss often occurs in one eye before the other. The wet form of age-related macular degeneration is associated with severe vision loss that can worsen rapidly. This form of the condition is characterized by the growth of abnormal, fragile blood vessels underneath the macula. These vessels leak blood and fluid, which damages the macula and makes central vision appear blurry and distorted.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
116576
Concept ID:
C0242383
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Obesity

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. The weight may come from muscle, bone, fat, and/or body water. Both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what's considered healthy for his or her height. . Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories than you use. The balance between calories-in and calories-out differs for each person. Factors that might affect your weight include your genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods, and not being physically active. . Being obese increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and some cancers. If you are obese, losing even 5 to 10 percent of your weight can delay or prevent some of these diseases. For example, that means losing 10 to 20 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
18127
Concept ID:
C0028754
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Malignant neoplastic disease

Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body. . Cancer is not just one disease but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Most treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Some may involve hormone therapy, biologic therapy, or stem cell transplantation. . NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14297
Concept ID:
C0006826
Neoplastic Process
5.

Degenerative disorder of macula

Macular degeneration, or age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is a leading cause of vision loss in Americans 60 and older. It is a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision. You need central vision to see objects clearly and to do tasks such as reading and driving. . AMD affects the macula, the part of the eye that allows you to see fine detail. It does not hurt, but it causes cells in the macula to die. There are two types: wet and dry. Wet AMD happens when abnormal blood vessels grow under the macula. These new blood vessels often leak blood and fluid. Wet AMD damages the macula quickly. Blurred vision is a common early symptom. Dry AMD happens when the light-sensitive cells in the macula slowly break down. Your gradually lose your central vision. A common early symptom is that straight lines appear crooked. Regular comprehensive eye exams can detect macular degeneration before the disease causes vision loss. Treatment can slow vision loss. It does not restore vision. NIH: National Eye Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7434
Concept ID:
C0024437
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Disease

Any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. The term is often used broadly to include injuries, disabilities, syndromes, symptoms, deviant behaviors, and atypical variations of structure and function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
4347
Concept ID:
C0012634
Disease or Syndrome
7.

disease

MedGen UID:
798428
Concept ID:
CN204926
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Prostate cancer

A cancer of the `prostate` (FMA:9600). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506673
Concept ID:
CN167851
Finding
9.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
449670

10.

Abnormality of the cardiovascular system

Any abnormality of the `cardiovascular system` (FMA:7161). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
427888
Concept ID:
CN001481
Finding
11.

Age-related macular degeneration 10

Age-related macular degeneration is an eye disease that is a leading cause of vision loss in older people in developed countries. The vision loss usually becomes noticeable in a person's sixties or seventies and tends to worsen over time. Age-related macular degeneration mainly affects central vision, which is needed for detailed tasks such as reading, driving, and recognizing faces. The vision loss in this condition results from a gradual deterioration of light-sensing cells in the tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color (the retina). Specifically, age-related macular degeneration affects a small area near the center of the retina, called the macula, which is responsible for central vision. Side (peripheral) vision and night vision are generally not affected. Researchers have described two major types of age-related macular degeneration, known as the dry form and the wet form. The dry form is much more common, accounting for 85 to 90 percent of all cases of age-related macular degeneration. It is characterized by a buildup of yellowish deposits called drusen beneath the retina and slowly progressive vision loss. The condition typically affects vision in both eyes, although vision loss often occurs in one eye before the other. The wet form of age-related macular degeneration is associated with severe vision loss that can worsen rapidly. This form of the condition is characterized by the growth of abnormal, fragile blood vessels underneath the macula. These vessels leak blood and fluid, which damages the macula and makes central vision appear blurry and distorted.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
409758
Concept ID:
C1969108
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Obesity

MedGen UID:
368429
Concept ID:
C1963185
Finding
13.

Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia short limb-hand type

MedGen UID:
338595
Concept ID:
C1849011
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Macular degeneration

MedGen UID:
336506
Concept ID:
C1849131
Finding
15.

Disease Response

The pathologic and/or clinical changes that result from treatment. The changes may include eradication of detectable disease, stabilization of disease, or disease progression. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
309976
Concept ID:
C1704632
Finding
16.

Disease Outcome

A measurable result or effect of treatment on a disease. Examples of outcomes include decreased pain, reduced tumor size, or worsening of disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
146272
Concept ID:
C0679250
Finding
17.

Context

The universe of discourse that surrounds a language unit and helps to determine its interpretation. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
105274
Concept ID:
C0449255
Finding
18.

Heart disease

If you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. It is also a major cause of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is narrowing or blockage of the coronary arteries, the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease and happens slowly over time. It's the major reason people have heart attacks. Other kinds of heart problems may happen to the valves in the heart, or the heart may not pump well and cause heart failure. Some people are born with heart disease. You can help reduce your risk of heart disease by taking steps to control factors that put you at greater risk:: - Control your blood pressure. - Lower your cholesterol. - Don't smoke. - Get enough exercise. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5458
Concept ID:
C0018799
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Tissue Degeneration

MedGen UID:
3705
Concept ID:
C0011164
Pathologic Function
20.

Disorder of cardiovascular system

A non-neoplastic or neoplastic disorder affecting the heart or the vessels (arteries, veins and lymph vessels). Representative examples of non-neoplastic cardiovascular disorders are endocarditis and hypertension. Representative examples of neoplastic cardiovascular disorders are endocardial myxoma and angiosarcoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
2848
Concept ID:
C0007222
Disease or Syndrome

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