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Results: 1 to 20 of 25

1.

Vomiting

To eject some or all of the contents of the stomach through the mouth. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
12124
Concept ID:
C0042963
Sign or Symptom
2.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Amitriptyline

Tricyclic antidepressant with anticholinergic and sedative properties. It appears to prevent the re-uptake of norepinephrine and serotonin at nerve terminals, thus potentiating the action of these neurotransmitters. Amitriptyline also appears to antagonize cholinergic and alpha-1 adrenergic responses to bioactive amines. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
1486
Concept ID:
C0002600
Pharmacologic Substance
4.

Vomiting

MedGen UID:
776588
Concept ID:
C2712332
Finding
5.

Amitriptyline

MedGen UID:
500841
Concept ID:
CN176764
Pharmacologic Substance
6.

SUPERNUMERARY DER(22)t(8

Carriers of the balanced constitutional translocation t(8;22)(q24.13;q11.2) are phenotypically normal but are at risk of having progeny with supernumerary der(22)t(8;22) syndrome as a result of malsegregation of the der(22). Although the supernumerary der(22)t(8;22) phenotype is variable between individuals, it tends to include ear and extremity abnormalities in addition to mild mental retardation (summary by Sheridan et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462316
Concept ID:
C3150966
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Cyclical vomiting syndrome

Cyclic vomiting syndrome is a disorder that causes recurrent episodes of nausea, vomiting, and tiredness (lethargy). This condition is diagnosed most often in young children, but it can affect people of any age. The episodes of nausea, vomiting, and lethargy last anywhere from an hour to 10 days. An affected person may vomit several times per hour, potentially leading to a dangerous loss of fluids (dehydration). Additional symptoms can include unusually pale skin (pallor), abdominal pain, diarrhea, headache, fever, and an increased sensitivity to light (photophobia) or to sound (phonophobia). In most affected people, the signs and symptoms of each attack are quite similar. These attacks can be debilitating, making it difficult for an affected person to go to work or school. Episodes of nausea, vomiting, and lethargy can occur regularly or apparently at random, or can be triggered by a variety of factors. The most common triggers are emotional excitement and infections. Other triggers can include periods without eating (fasting), temperature extremes, lack of sleep, overexertion, allergies, ingesting certain foods or alcohol, and menstruation. If the condition is not treated, episodes usually occur four to 12 times per year. Between attacks, vomiting is absent, and nausea is either absent or much reduced. However, many affected people experience other symptoms during and between episodes, including pain, lethargy, digestive disorders such as gastroesophageal reflux and irritable bowel syndrome, and fainting spells (syncope). People with cyclic vomiting syndrome are also more likely than people without the disorder to experience depression, anxiety, and panic disorder. It is unclear whether these health conditions are directly related to nausea and vomiting. Cyclic vomiting syndrome is often considered to be a variant of migraines, which are severe headaches often associated with pain, nausea, vomiting, and extreme sensitivity to light and sound. Cyclic vomiting syndrome is likely the same as or closely related to a condition called abdominal migraine, which is characterized by attacks of stomach pain and cramping. Attacks of nausea, vomiting, or abdominal pain in childhood may be replaced by migraine headaches as an affected person gets older. Many people with cyclic vomiting syndrome or abdominal migraine have a family history of migraines. Most people with cyclic vomiting syndrome have normal intelligence, although some affected people have developmental delay or intellectual disability. Autism spectrum disorders, which affect communication and social interaction, have also been associated with cyclic vomiting syndrome. Additionally, muscle weakness (myopathy) and seizures are possible. People with any of these additional features are said to have cyclic vomiting syndrome plus.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
57509
Concept ID:
C0152164
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Laroxyl

MedGen UID:
453360
Concept ID:
C2980004
Pharmacologic Substance
9.

Anapsique

MedGen UID:
303930
Concept ID:
C1448425
Pharmacologic Substance
10.

Amitrol

MedGen UID:
303929
Concept ID:
C1448424
Pharmacologic Substance
11.

Sarotex

MedGen UID:
303928
Concept ID:
C1448418
Pharmacologic Substance
12.

Apo-Amitriptyline

MedGen UID:
257408
Concept ID:
C1448426
Pharmacologic Substance
13.

Amitrip

MedGen UID:
257407
Concept ID:
C1448423
Pharmacologic Substance
14.

Tryptine

MedGen UID:
257406
Concept ID:
C1448419
Pharmacologic Substance
15.

Amitriptylin-neuraxpharm

MedGen UID:
255211
Concept ID:
C1448430
Pharmacologic Substance
16.

Amineurin

MedGen UID:
255208
Concept ID:
C1448422
Pharmacologic Substance
17.

Novoprotect

MedGen UID:
255207
Concept ID:
C1448421
Pharmacologic Substance
18.

Syneudon

MedGen UID:
253303
Concept ID:
C1448420
Pharmacologic Substance
19.

Endep

MedGen UID:
196550
Concept ID:
C0733667
Pharmacologic Substance
20.

Damilen

MedGen UID:
148062
Concept ID:
C0733668
Pharmacologic Substance

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