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Results: 1 to 20 of 44

1.

Degeneration of retina

A retrogressive pathological change in the retina, focal or generalized, caused by genetic defects, inflammation, trauma, vascular disease, or aging. Degeneration affecting predominantly the macula lutea of the retina is MACULAR DEGENERATION. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p304) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
48432
Concept ID:
C0035304
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Retinal degeneration

A deterioration of the retina. This nonspecific term is retained here because of its wide use in the literature, but if possible new annotations should indicate the precise type of retinal abnormality. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504488
Concept ID:
CN000512
Finding
3.

Deranged function in an individual or an organ that is due to a disease. (MedicineNet.com) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
124450
Concept ID:
C0277785
4.

Retinaldehyde

A carotenoid constituent of visual pigments. It is the oxidized form of retinol which functions as the active component of the visual cycle. It is bound to the protein opsin forming the complex rhodopsin. When stimulated by visible light, the retinal component of the rhodopsin complex undergoes isomerization at the 11-position of the double bond to the cis-form; this is reversed in "dark" reactions to return to the native trans-configuration. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
19764
Concept ID:
C0035331
Pharmacologic Substance
5.

Tissue Degeneration

MedGen UID:
3705
Concept ID:
C0011164
Pathologic Function
6.

Leber's amaurosis

Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe dystrophy of the retina, typically becomes evident in the first year of life. Visual function is usually poor and often accompanied by nystagmus, sluggish or near-absent pupillary responses, photophobia, high hyperopia, and keratoconus. Visual acuity is rarely better than 20/400. A characteristic finding is Franceschetti's oculo-digital sign, comprising eye poking, pressing, and rubbing. The appearance of the fundus is extremely variable. While the retina may initially appear normal, a pigmentary retinopathy reminiscent of retinitis pigmentosa is frequently observed later in childhood. The electroretinogram (ERG) is characteristically "nondetectable" or severely subnormal. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
137922
Concept ID:
C0339527
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Senior-Loken syndrome 1

Senior-Løken syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of two specific features: a kidney condition called nephronophthisis and an eye condition known as Leber congenital amaurosis. Nephronophthisis causes fluid-filled cysts to develop in the kidneys beginning in childhood. These cysts impair kidney function, initially causing increased urine production (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), general weakness, and extreme tiredness (fatigue). Nephronophthisis leads to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) later in childhood or in adolescence. ESRD is a life-threatening failure of kidney function that occurs when the kidneys are no longer able to filter fluids and waste products from the body effectively. Leber congenital amaurosis primarily affects the retina, which is the specialized tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color. This condition causes vision problems, including an increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus), and extreme farsightedness (hyperopia). Some people with Senior-Løken syndrome develop the signs of Leber congenital amaurosis within the first few years of life, while others do not develop vision problems until later in childhood.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
96045
Concept ID:
C0403553
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Amaurosis

MedGen UID:
87672
Concept ID:
C0376288
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Retinitis pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited disorders in which abnormalities of the photoreceptors (rods and cones) or the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the retina lead to progressive visual loss. Affected individuals first experience defective dark adaptation or "night blindness," followed by constriction of peripheral visual fields and, eventually, loss of central vision late in the course of the disease. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
20551
Concept ID:
C0035334
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Retinitis

Inflammation of the RETINA. It is rarely limited to the retina, but is commonly associated with diseases of the choroid (CHORIORETINITIS) and of the OPTIC DISK (neuroretinitis). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
19765
Concept ID:
C0035333
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Photoreceptor degeneration

MedGen UID:
745042
Concept ID:
C1998028
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Retinitis pigmentosa

Hereditary degeneration and atrophy of the retina. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504473
Concept ID:
CN000477
Finding
14.

Renal dysplasia and retinal aplasia

Senior-Loken syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease with the main features of nephronophthisis (NPHP; see 256100) and Leber congenital amaurosis (see 204000). Mutations in some of the same genes that cause nephronophthisis (see 256100) cause Senior-Loken syndrome. Genetic Heterogeneity of Senior-Loken Syndrome Other forms of SLSN include SLSN4 (606996), caused by mutation in the NPHP4 gene (607215) on chromosome 1p36; SLSN5 (609254), caused by mutation in the NPHP5 gene (IQCB1; 609237) on chromosome 3q21; SLSN6 (610189), caused by mutation in the NPHP6 gene (CEP290; 610142) on chromosome 12q21; and SLSN7 (613615), caused by mutation in the SDCCAG8 gene (613524) on chromosome 1q44. Another form of SLSN, SLSN3 (606995), has been mapped to a locus on chromosome 3q22, overlapping the NPHP3 locus (604387). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
468381
Concept ID:
CN117960
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Leber congenital amaurosis 8

Leber congenital amaurosis comprises a group of early-onset childhood retinal dystrophies characterized by vision loss, nystagmus, and severe retinal dysfunction. Patients usually present at birth with profound vision loss and pendular nystagmus. Electroretinogram (ERG) responses are usually nonrecordable. Other clinical findings may include high hypermetropia, photodysphoria, oculodigital sign, keratoconus, cataracts, and a variable appearance to the fundus (summary by Chung and Traboulsi, 2009). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of LCA, see 204000. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462552
Concept ID:
C3151202
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Leber congenital amaurosis 7

Leber congenital amaurosis is an eye disorder that primarily affects the retina, which is the specialized tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color. People with this disorder typically have severe visual impairment beginning in infancy. The visual impairment tends to be stable, although it may worsen very slowly over time. Leber congenital amaurosis is also associated with other vision problems, including an increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus), and extreme farsightedness (hyperopia). The pupils, which usually expand and contract in response to the amount of light entering the eye, do not react normally to light. Instead, they expand and contract more slowly than normal, or they may not respond to light at all. Additionally, the clear front covering of the eye (the cornea) may be cone-shaped and abnormally thin, a condition known as keratoconus. A specific behavior called Franceschetti's oculo-digital sign is characteristic of Leber congenital amaurosis. This sign consists of poking, pressing, and rubbing the eyes with a knuckle or finger. Researchers suspect that this behavior may contribute to deep-set eyes and keratoconus in affected children. In rare cases, delayed development and intellectual disability have been reported in people with the features of Leber congenital amaurosis. However, researchers are uncertain whether these individuals actually have Leber congenital amaurosis or another syndrome with similar signs and symptoms. At least 13 types of Leber congenital amaurosis have been described. The types are distinguished by their genetic cause, patterns of vision loss, and related eye abnormalities.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
462542
Concept ID:
C3151192
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Cone-rod dystrophy 13

MedGen UID:
413025
Concept ID:
C2750720
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Congenital blindness

MedGen UID:
409767
Concept ID:
C1969147
Finding
19.

Leber congenital amaurosis 5

Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe dystrophy of the retina, typically becomes evident in the first year of life. Visual function is usually poor and often accompanied by nystagmus, sluggish or near-absent pupillary responses, photophobia, high hyperopia, and keratoconus. Visual acuity is rarely better than 20/400. A characteristic finding is Franceschetti's oculo-digital sign, comprising eye poking, pressing, and rubbing. The appearance of the fundus is extremely variable. While the retina may initially appear normal, a pigmentary retinopathy reminiscent of retinitis pigmentosa is frequently observed later in childhood. The electroretinogram (ERG) is characteristically "nondetectable" or severely subnormal. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
388031
Concept ID:
C1858301
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Leber congenital amaurosis 13

Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe dystrophy of the retina, typically becomes evident in the first year of life. Visual function is usually poor and often accompanied by nystagmus, sluggish or near-absent pupillary responses, photophobia, high hyperopia, and keratoconus. Visual acuity is rarely better than 20/400. A characteristic finding is Franceschetti's oculo-digital sign, comprising eye poking, pressing, and rubbing. The appearance of the fundus is extremely variable. While the retina may initially appear normal, a pigmentary retinopathy reminiscent of retinitis pigmentosa is frequently observed later in childhood. The electroretinogram (ERG) is characteristically "nondetectable" or severely subnormal. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
382544
Concept ID:
C2675186
Disease or Syndrome

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