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Results: 1 to 20 of 56

1.

Water

Chemical compound that is liquid at room temperature and is composed two hydrogen atoms connected to an oxygen atom. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
22697
Concept ID:
C0043047
Pharmacologic Substance
2.

Inflammation

A microscopic finding indicating the presence of acute, subacute or chronic inflammation in a tissue sample. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7072
Concept ID:
C0021368
Pathologic Function
3.

Sulfasalazine

A drug that is used in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases. Its activity is generally considered to lie in its metabolic breakdown product, 5-aminosalicylic acid (see MESALAMINE) released in the colon. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p907) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
48534
Concept ID:
C0036078
Pharmacologic Substance
4.

Oxygen

An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
45267
Concept ID:
C0030054
Pharmacologic Substance
5.

Body Weight decreased

Decrease in existing BODY WEIGHT. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
21911
Concept ID:
C0043096
Finding
6.

Malignant neoplastic disease

Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body. . Cancer is not just one disease but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Most treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Some may involve hormone therapy, biologic therapy, or stem cell transplantation. . NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14297
Concept ID:
C0006826
Neoplastic Process
7.

aminosalicylic acid

An antitubercular agent often administered in association with ISONIAZID. The sodium salt of the drug is better tolerated than the free acid. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10534
Concept ID:
C0030125
Pharmacologic Substance
8.

Disease

Any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. The term is often used broadly to include injuries, disabilities, syndromes, symptoms, deviant behaviors, and atypical variations of structure and function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
4347
Concept ID:
C0012634
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
1483

10.

disease

MedGen UID:
798428
Concept ID:
CN204926
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Inflammation of the large intestine

MedGen UID:
505065
Concept ID:
CN001842
Finding
12.

Weight loss

Reduction inexisting body weight. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504965
Concept ID:
CN001653
Finding
13.

Colon cancer

MedGen UID:
446464
Concept ID:
CN002715
Finding
14.

Familial colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that is common in both men and women. In addition to lifestyle and environmental risk factors, gene defects can contribute to an inherited predisposition to CRC. CRC is caused by changes in different molecular pathogenic pathways, such as chromosomal instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite instability. Chromosome instability is the most common alteration and is present in almost 85% of all cases (review by Schweiger et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Colorectal Cancer Mutations in a single gene result in a marked predisposition to colorectal cancer in 2 distinct syndromes: familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP; 175100) and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC; see 120435). FAP is caused by mutations in the APC gene (611731), whereas HNPCC is caused by mutations in several genes, including MSH2 (609309), MLH1 (120436), PMS1 (600258), PMS2 (600259), MSH6 (600678), TGFBR2 (190182), and MLH3 (604395). Epigenetic silencing of MSH2 results in a form of HNPCC (see HNPCC8, 613244). Other colorectal cancer syndromes include autosomal recessive adenomatous polyposis (608456), which is caused by mutations in the MUTYH gene (604933), and oligodontia-colorectal cancer syndrome (608615), which is caused by mutations in the AXIN2 gene (604025). The CHEK2 gene (604373) has been implicated in susceptibility to colorectal cancer in Finnish patients. A germline mutation in the PLA2G2A gene (172411) was identified in a patient with colorectal cancer. Germline susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer have also been identified. CRCS1 (608812) is conferred by mutation in the GALNT12 gene (610290) on chromosome 9q22; CRCS2 (611469) maps to chromosome 8q24; CRCS3 (612229) is conferred by variation in the SMAD7 gene (602932) on chromosome 18; CRCS4 (601228) is conferred by variation on 15q that causes increased and ectopic expression of the GREM1 gene (603054); CRCS5 (612230) maps to chromosome 10p14; CRCS6 (612231) maps to chromosome 8q23; CRCS7 (612232) maps to chromosome 11q23; CRCS8 (612589) maps to chromosome 14q22; CRCS9 (612590) maps to 16q22; CRCS10 (612591) is conferred by mutation in the POLD1 gene (174761) on chromosome 19q13; CRCS11 (612592) maps to chromosome 20p12; and CRCS12 (615083) is conferred by mutation in the POLE gene (174762) on chromosome 12q24. Somatic mutations in many different genes, including KRAS (190070), PIK3CA (171834), BRAF (164757), CTNNB1 (116806), FGFR3 (134934), AXIN2 (604025), AKT1 (164730), MCC (159350), MYH11 (160745), and PARK2 (602544) have been identified in colorectal cancer. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
430218
Concept ID:
CN029768
Disease or Syndrome
15.

PROGRESSIVE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS WITH RIGIDITY

MedGen UID:
349287
Concept ID:
C1861457
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Colorectal Cancer

The colon and rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of the large intestine. It is common in both men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more likely to get it if you have colorectal polyps, a family history of colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, eat a diet high in fat, or smoke. Symptoms of colorectal cancer include: -Diarrhea or constipation. -A feeling that your bowel does not empty completely. -Blood (either bright red or very dark) in your stool. -Stools that are narrower than usual. -Frequent gas pains or cramps, or feeling full or bloated. -Weight loss with no known reason. -Fatigue. -Nausea or vomiting. Because you may not have symptoms at first, it's important to have screening tests. Everyone over 50 should get screened. Tests include colonoscopy and tests for blood in the stool. Treatments for colorectal cancer include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, or a combination. Surgery can usually cure it when it is found early. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
287122
Concept ID:
C1527249
Neoplastic Process
17.

Carcinoma of colon

Cancer that forms in the tissues of the colon (the longest part of the large intestine). Most colon cancers are adenocarcinomas (cancers that begin in cells that make and release mucus and other fluids). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
147065
Concept ID:
C0699790
Neoplastic Process
18.

Van der Woude syndrome

IRF6-related disorders span a spectrum from isolated cleft lip and palate and Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) at the mild end to popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS) at the more severe end. Individuals with VWS show one or more of the following anomalies: Congenital, usually bilateral, paramedian lower-lip fistulae (pits) or sometimes small mounds with a sinus tract leading from a mucous gland of the lip. Cleft lip (CL). Cleft palate (CP)?Note: Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL±P) is observed about twice as often as CP only. Submucous cleft palate (SMCP). The PPS phenotype includes the following: CL±P . Fistulae of the lower lip . Webbing of the skin extending from the ischial tuberosities to the heels . In males: bifid scrotum and cryptorchidism. In females: hypoplasia of the labia majora. Syndactyly of fingers and/or toes . Anomalies of the skin around the nails. A characteristic pyramidal fold of skin overlying the nail of the hallux (almost pathognomonic) . In some non-classic forms of PPS: filiform synechiae connecting the upper and lower jaws (syngnathia) or the upper and lower eyelids (ankyloblepharon) . In both VWS and PPS, growth and intelligence are normal. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
61233
Concept ID:
C0175697
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Inflammatory bowel disease

A spectrum of small and large bowel inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. It includes Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and colitis of indeterminate type. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
43877
Concept ID:
C0021390
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Ulcer

The formation of a break on the skin or on the surface of an organ. An ulcer forms when the surface cells die and are cast off. Ulcers may be associated with cancer and other diseases. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
22541
Concept ID:
C0041582
Pathologic Function

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