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Results: 16

1.

Neonatal

From delivery to 4 weeks of life. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
832381
Concept ID:
CN227392
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Placental abruption

Separation of the placenta from the uterus wall before delivery. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
776606
Concept ID:
CN167147
Finding
3.

Thromboembolism

The formation of a blood clot inside a blood vessel that subsequently travels through the blood stream from the site where it formed to another location in the body, generally leading to vascular occlusion at the distant site. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505000
Concept ID:
CN001725
Finding
4.

Hypercoagulability

MedGen UID:
463623
Concept ID:
C3160733
Finding
5.

Preeclampsia

Pregnancy-induced hypertension in association with significant amounts of protein in the urine. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
451904
Concept ID:
CN117494
Finding
6.

Severe intrauterine growth retardation

MedGen UID:
383783
Concept ID:
C1855843
Finding
7.

Preeclampsia/eclampsia 2

Preeclampsia is a complication of pregnancy in which affected women develop high blood pressure (hypertension) and can also have abnormally high levels of protein in their urine. This condition usually occurs in the last few months of pregnancy and often requires the early delivery of the infant. Many women with mild preeclampsia do not feel ill, and the problem is first detected through blood pressure and urine testing in their doctor's office. Other early features of the disorder are swelling (edema) of the face or hands and a weight gain of more than 2 pounds within a few days. More severely affected women may experience headaches, dizziness, irritability, shortness of breath, a decrease in urination, upper abdominal pain, nausea, or vomiting. Vision changes may develop, including flashing lights or spots, increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), blurry vision, or temporary blindness. In most cases, preeclampsia is mild and goes away within a few weeks after the baby is born. In severe cases, however, preeclampsia can impact the mother's organs such as the heart, liver, and kidneys and can lead to life-threatening complications. Extreme hypertension in the mother can cause bleeding in the brain (hemorrhagic stroke). The effects of high blood pressure on the brain (hypertensive encephalopathy) may also result in seizures. If seizures occur, the condition is considered to have progressed to eclampsia, which can result in coma. Without treatment to help prevent seizures, about 1 in 200 women with preeclampsia develop eclampsia. Between 10 and 20 percent of women with severe preeclampsia develop another potentially life-threatening complication called HELLP syndrome. HELLP stands for hemolysis (premature red blood cell breakdown), elevated liver enzyme levels, and low platelets (cell fragments involved in blood clotting), which are the key features of this condition. Severe preeclampsia can also affect the fetus, with impairment of blood and oxygen flow leading to growth problems or stillbirth. Infants delivered early due to preeclampsia may have complications associated with prematurity, such as breathing problems caused by underdeveloped lungs. Women who have had preeclampsia have approximately twice the lifetime risk of heart disease and stroke than do women in the general population. Researchers suggest this may be due to common factors that increase the risk of preeclampsia, heart disease, and stroke.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
322876
Concept ID:
C1836257
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Preeclampsia/eclampsia 3

Preeclampsia is a complication of pregnancy in which affected women develop high blood pressure (hypertension) and can also have abnormally high levels of protein in their urine. This condition usually occurs in the last few months of pregnancy and often requires the early delivery of the infant. Many women with mild preeclampsia do not feel ill, and the problem is first detected through blood pressure and urine testing in their doctor's office. Other early features of the disorder are swelling (edema) of the face or hands and a weight gain of more than 2 pounds within a few days. More severely affected women may experience headaches, dizziness, irritability, shortness of breath, a decrease in urination, upper abdominal pain, nausea, or vomiting. Vision changes may develop, including flashing lights or spots, increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), blurry vision, or temporary blindness. In most cases, preeclampsia is mild and goes away within a few weeks after the baby is born. In severe cases, however, preeclampsia can impact the mother's organs such as the heart, liver, and kidneys and can lead to life-threatening complications. Extreme hypertension in the mother can cause bleeding in the brain (hemorrhagic stroke). The effects of high blood pressure on the brain (hypertensive encephalopathy) may also result in seizures. If seizures occur, the condition is considered to have progressed to eclampsia, which can result in coma. Without treatment to help prevent seizures, about 1 in 200 women with preeclampsia develop eclampsia. Between 10 and 20 percent of women with severe preeclampsia develop another potentially life-threatening complication called HELLP syndrome. HELLP stands for hemolysis (premature red blood cell breakdown), elevated liver enzyme levels, and low platelets (cell fragments involved in blood clotting), which are the key features of this condition. Severe preeclampsia can also affect the fetus, with impairment of blood and oxygen flow leading to growth problems or stillbirth. Infants delivered early due to preeclampsia may have complications associated with prematurity, such as breathing problems caused by underdeveloped lungs. Women who have had preeclampsia have approximately twice the lifetime risk of heart disease and stroke than do women in the general population. Researchers suggest this may be due to common factors that increase the risk of preeclampsia, heart disease, and stroke.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
322875
Concept ID:
C1836256
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Stillbirth

If a woman loses a pregnancy after she's past her 20th week, it's called a stillbirth. Stillbirths are due to natural causes. They can happen before delivery or during delivery. Causes include:. -Problems with the placenta, the organ that transports oxygen and nutrients to the fetus. -Genetic problems with the fetus. -Fetal infections. -Other physical problems in the fetus. In at least half of all cases, it is not possible to tell why the baby died. If stillbirth happens before delivery, your health care provider may induce labor or perform a Cesarean section to deliver the fetus. In some cases, you can wait until you go into labor yourself. This usually happens within two weeks of stillbirth. Counseling may help you cope with your grief. Later, if you do decide to try again, work closely with your health care provider to lower the risks. Many women who have a stillbirth go on to have healthy babies. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
154536
Concept ID:
C0595939
Finding
10.

Placental infarction

Interruption of the blood supply to a portion of the placenta, resulting in ischemic necrosis. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
107515
Concept ID:
C0554393
Pathologic Function
11.

Thrombophilia

Prothrombin-related thrombophilia is characterized by venous thromboembolism (VTE) manifest most commonly in adults as deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) in the legs or pulmonary embolism. The clinical expression of prothrombin-related thrombophilia is variable; many individuals heterozygous or homozygous for the 20210G>A (G20210A or c.*97G>A) allele in F2 never develop thrombosis, and while most heterozygotes who develop thrombotic complications remain asymptomatic until adulthood, some have recurrent thromboembolism before age 30 years. The relative risk for DVT in adults heterozygous for the 20210G>A allele is two- to fivefold increased; in children, the relative risk for thrombosis is three- to fourfold increased. 20210G>A heterozygosity has at most a modest effect on recurrence risk after a first episode. Although prothrombin-related thrombophilia may increase the risk for pregnancy loss, its association with preeclampsia and other complications of pregnancy such as intrauterine growth restriction and placental abruption remains controversial. Factors that predispose to thrombosis in prothrombin-related thrombophilia include: the number of 20210G>A alleles; presence of coexisting genetic abnormalities including factor V Leiden; and acquired thrombophilic disorders (e.g., antiphospholipid antibodies). Circumstantial risk factors for thrombosis include pregnancy and oral contraceptive use. Some evidence suggests that the risk for VTE in 20210G>A heterozygotes increases after travel. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
98306
Concept ID:
C0398623
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Neonatal death

The death of a live-born INFANT less than 28 days of age. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
96084
Concept ID:
C0410916
Finding
13.

Asymptomatic

The finding of no indications of a particular disease or injury. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
65413
Concept ID:
C0231221
Finding
14.

Preeclampsia/eclampsia 1

Preeclampsia, which along with chronic hypertension and gestational hypertension comprise the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, is characterized by new hypertension (blood pressure 140/90 or greater) presenting after 20 weeks' gestation with clinically relevant proteinuria. Preeclampsia is 1 of the top 4 causes of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide (summary by Payne et al., 2011). Preeclampsia is otherwise known as gestational proteinuric hypertension (Davey and MacGillivray, 1988). A high proportion of patients with preeclampsia have glomerular endotheliosis, the unique histopathologic feature of the condition (Fisher et al., 1981). A distinct form of severe preeclampsia is characterized by hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platlets (HELLP syndrome) (Brown et al., 2000). Genetic Heterogeneity of Preeclampsia/Eclampsia Susceptibility loci for preeclampsia/eclampsia include PEE1 on chromosome 2p13, PEE2 (609402) on chromosome 2p25, and PEE3 (609403) on chromosome 9p13. PEE4 (609404) is caused by mutation in the STOX1 gene (609397) on chromosome 10q22. PEE5 (614595) is caused by mutation in the CORIN gene (605236) on chromosome 4p12. An association with PEE has been found with the EPHX1 gene (132810) on chromosome 1q. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
18608
Concept ID:
C0032914
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Pregnancy

So you're going to have a baby! Whether you are pregnant or are planning to get pregnant, you will want to give your baby a healthy start. You need to have regular visits with your healthcare provider. These prenatal care visits are very important for your baby and yourself. Some things you might do when you are pregnant could hurt your baby, such as smoking or drinking. Some medicines can also be a problem, even ones that a doctor prescribed. You will need to drink plenty of fluids and eat a healthy diet. You may also be tired and need more rest. Your body will change as your baby grows during the nine months of your pregnancy. Don't hesitate to call your health care provider if you think you have a problem or something is bothering or worrying you. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10895
Concept ID:
C0032961
16.

Intrauterine growth restriction

abnormal fetal physical growth or growth potential at any gestational stage. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
4693
Concept ID:
C0015934
Pathologic Function

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