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Results: 1 to 20 of 25

1.

Recruitment

MedGen UID:
78772
Concept ID:
C0271510
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Ubiquitination

The process in which one or more ubiquitin groups are added to a protein. [GOC:ai] [from GO]

MedGen UID:
276919
Concept ID:
C1519751
Molecular Function
3.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
506929

4.

Neurodegeneration

Progressive loss of neural cells and tissue. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505144
Concept ID:
CN001976
Finding
5.

Mitochondrial inheritance

A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on the mitochondrial genome. Because the mitochondrial genome is essentially always maternally inherited, a mitochondrial condition can only be transmitted by females, although the condition can affect both sexes. The proportion of mutant mitochondria can vary (heteroplasmy). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504838
Concept ID:
CN001305
Finding
6.

Autophagic vacuoles

The lysosomal-vacuolar pathway has a role in the controlled intracellular digestion of macromolecules such as protein complexes and organelles. This feature refers to the presence of an abnormally increased number of autophagic vacuoles in muscle tissue. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
425156
Concept ID:
CN003375
Finding
7.

Parkinson disease 2

Parkin type of early-onset Parkinson disease is characterized by rigidity, bradykinesia, and resting tremor. Lower-limb dystonia may be a presenting sign. Onset usually occurs between ages 20 and 40 years with an average age of onset in the early to mid-thirties. The disease is slowly progressive and disease duration of more than 50 years has been reported. Clinical signs vary; hyperreflexia is common. Dyskinesia as a result of treatment with levodopa frequently occurs. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
401500
Concept ID:
C1868675
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Autosomal recessive inheritance

Autosomal recessive inheritance refers to genetic conditions that occur only when mutations are present in both copies of a given gene (i.e., the person is homozygous for a mutation, or carries two different mutations of the same gene, a state referred to as compound heterozygosity). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
9.

Parkinson's disease

Parkinsonism refers to all clinical states characterized by tremor, muscle rigidity, slowed movement (bradykinesia) and often postural instability. Parkinson disease is the primary and most common form of parkinsonism. Psychiatric manifestations, which include depression and visual hallucinations, are common but not uniformly present. Dementia eventually occurs in at least 20% of cases. The most common sporadic form of Parkinson disease manifests around age 60; however, young-onset and even juvenile presentations are seen. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
10590
Concept ID:
C0030567
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Chronic granulomatous disease

A defect of leukocyte function in which phagocytic cells ingest but fail to digest bacteria, resulting in recurring bacterial infections with granuloma formation. When chronic granulomatous disease is caused by mutations in the CYBB gene, the condition is inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern. When chronic granulomatous disease is caused by CYBA, NCF1, NCF2, or NCF4 gene mutations, the condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
5377
Concept ID:
C0018203
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Membrane Transport Modulators

Agents that affect ION PUMPS; ION CHANNELS; ABC TRANSPORTERS; and other MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROTEINS. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
288786
Concept ID:
C1563710
Pharmacologic Substance
12.

Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action

Pharmacological activities at the molecular level of DRUGS and other exogenous compounds that are used to treat DISEASES and affect normal BIOCHEMISTRY. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
226255
Concept ID:
C1258062
Molecular Function
13.

Juvenile Parkinson's disease

MedGen UID:
155699
Concept ID:
C0752105
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Proton-Motive Force

Energy that is generated by the transfer of protons or electrons across an energy-transducing membrane and that can be used for chemical, osmotic, or mechanical work. Proton-motive force can be generated by a variety of phenomena including the operation of an electron transport chain, illumination of a PURPLE MEMBRANE, and the hydrolysis of ATP by a proton ATPase. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed, p171) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
129182
Concept ID:
C0282517
Molecular Function
15.

Neurodegenerative Disorders

Neurodegenerative disorders, such as Hunter syndrome, or sensory motor neuropathies, such as Friedreich ataxia and Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome. [from LNC]

MedGen UID:
101195
Concept ID:
C0524851
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Parkinsonism

A group of disorders which feature impaired motor control characterized by bradykinesia, MUSCLE RIGIDITY; TREMOR; and postural instability. Parkinsonian diseases are generally divided into primary parkinsonism (see PARKINSON DISEASE), secondary parkinsonism (see PARKINSON DISEASE, SECONDARY) and inherited forms. These conditions are associated with dysfunction of dopaminergic or closely related motor integration neuronal pathways in the BASAL GANGLIA. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
66079
Concept ID:
C0242422
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Nitrile

Organic compounds containing the -CN radical. The concept is distinguished from CYANIDES, which denotes inorganic salts of HYDROGEN CYANIDE. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
45099
Concept ID:
C0028131
Pharmacologic Substance
18.

Protein binding

The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
18704
Concept ID:
C0033618
Molecular Function
19.

Disorder of nervous system

The brain, spinal cord, and nerves make up the nervous system. Together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can have trouble moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing, or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses, or mood. There are more than 600 neurologic diseases. Major types include: - Diseases caused by faulty genes, such as Huntington's disease and muscular dystrophy. - Problems with the way the nervous system develops, such as spina bifida. - Degenerative diseases, where nerve cells are damaged or die, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. - Diseases of the blood vessels that supply the brain, such as stroke. - Injuries to the spinal cord and brain. - Seizure disorders, such as epilepsy . - Cancer, such as brain tumors. - infections, such as meningitis.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14336
Concept ID:
C0027765
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Disorder of brain

The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, when problems occur, the results can be devastating. . Inflammation in the brain can lead to problems such as vision loss, weakness and paralysis. Loss of brain cells, which happens if you suffer a stroke, can affect your ability to think clearly. Brain tumors can also press on nerves and affect brain function. Some brain diseases are genetic. And we do not know what causes some brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. The symptoms of brain diseases vary widely depending on the specific problem. In some cases, damage is permanent. In other cases, treatments such as surgery, medicines, or physical therapy can correct the source of the problem or improve symptoms. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14214
Concept ID:
C0006111
Disease or Syndrome

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