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Depression

MedGen UID:
137999
Concept ID:
C0344315
Finding
Synonyms: Depressive disorder
SNOMED CT: Depressed (35489007); Depressed mood (366979004)
 
HPO: HP:0000716

Conditions with this feature

Celiac disease
MedGen UID:
3291
Concept ID:
C0007570
Disease or Syndrome
Celiac disease is a systemic immune disease that can be associated with gastrointestinal findings (diarrhea, weight loss, abdominal pain, anorexia, lactose intolerance, abdominal distention, and irritability) and/or highly variable non-gastrointestinal findings (iron-deficiency anemia, dermatitis herpetiformis, chronic fatigue, joint pain/inflammation, migraines, depression, attention-deficit disorder, epilepsy, osteoporosis/osteopenia, infertility and/or recurrent fetal loss, vitamin deficiencies, short stature, failure to thrive, delayed puberty, dental enamel defects, and autoimmune disorders). Classic celiac disease, characterized by mild to severe gastrointestinal symptoms, is less common than nonclassic celiac disease, characterized by absence of gastrointestinal symptoms.
Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome
MedGen UID:
4886
Concept ID:
C0017495
Disease or Syndrome
Genetic prion diseases generally manifest with cognitive difficulties, ataxia, and myoclonus (abrupt jerking movements of muscle groups and/or entire limbs). The order of appearance and/or predominance of these features and other associated neurologic and psychiatric findings vary. Familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia (FFI) represent the core phenotypes of genetic prion disease. Note: A fourth clinical phenotype, known as Huntington disease like-1 (HDL-1) has been proposed, but this is based on a single report, and the underlying pathologic features would categorize it as GSS. Although it is clear that these four subtypes display overlapping clinical and pathologic features, recognition of these phenotypes can be useful when providing affected individuals and their families with information about the expected clinical course. The age at onset ranges from the third to ninth decade of life. The course ranges from a few months to several years (typically 5-7 years; in rare instances, >10 years).
Pigmentary pallidal degeneration
MedGen UID:
6708
Concept ID:
C0018523
Disease or Syndrome
Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a form of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, or NBIA (formerly called Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome). PKAN is characterized by progressive dystonia and basal ganglia iron deposition with onset that usually occurs before age ten years. Commonly associated features include dysarthria, rigidity, and pigmentary retinopathy. Approximately 25% of affected individuals have an 'atypical' presentation with later onset (age >10 years), prominent speech defects, psychiatric disturbances, and more gradual progression of disease.
Huntington's chorea
MedGen UID:
5654
Concept ID:
C0020179
Disease or Syndrome
Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive disorder of motor, cognitive, and psychiatric disturbances. The mean age of onset is 35 to 44 years and the median survival time is 15 to 18 years after onset.
Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease
MedGen UID:
7179
Concept ID:
C0022336
Disease or Syndrome
Genetic prion diseases generally manifest with cognitive difficulties, ataxia, and myoclonus (abrupt jerking movements of muscle groups and/or entire limbs). The order of appearance and/or predominance of these features and other associated neurologic and psychiatric findings vary. Familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia (FFI) represent the core phenotypes of genetic prion disease. Note: A fourth clinical phenotype, known as Huntington disease like-1 (HDL-1) has been proposed, but this is based on a single report, and the underlying pathologic features would categorize it as GSS. Although it is clear that these four subtypes display overlapping clinical and pathologic features, recognition of these phenotypes can be useful when providing affected individuals and their families with information about the expected clinical course. The age at onset ranges from the third to ninth decade of life. The course ranges from a few months to several years (typically 5-7 years; in rare instances, >10 years).
Adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis
MedGen UID:
7230
Concept ID:
C0022797
Disease or Syndrome
The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of inherited, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorders characterized by progressive intellectual and motor deterioration, seizures, and early death. Visual gvhmloss is a feature of most forms. Clinical phenotypes have been characterized traditionally according to the age of onset and order of appearance of clinical features into infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adult, and Northern epilepsy (also known as progressive epilepsy with mental retardation [EPMR]). There is however genetic and allelic heterogeneity; a proposed new nomenclature and classification system has been developed to take into account both the responsible gene and the age at disease onset; for example, CLN1 disease, infantile onset and CLN1 disease, juvenile onset are both caused by mutations in PPT1 but with differing age of onset. The most prevalent NCLs are CLN3 disease, classic juvenile and CLN2 disease, classic late infantile (although prevalence varies by ethnicity and country of family origin): CLN2 disease, classic late infantile. The first symptoms typically appear between age two and four years, usually starting with epilepsy, followed by regression of developmental milestones, myoclonic ataxia, and pyramidal signs. Visual impairment typically appears at age four to six years and rapidly progresses to light /dark awareness only. Life expectancy ranges from age six years to early teenage. CLN3 disease, classic juvenile. Onset is usually between ages four and ten years. Rapidly progressing visual loss resulting in severe visual impairment within one to two years is often the first clinical sign. Epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures and/or complex-partial seizures typically appears around age ten years. Life expectancy ranges from the late teens to the 30s. Other forms of NCL may present with behavior changes, epilepsy, visual impairment, or slowing of developmental progress and then loss of skills. The course may be extremely variable. Some genotype-phenotype information is available.
Stiff-man syndrome
MedGen UID:
39017
Concept ID:
C0085292
Disease or Syndrome
The stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is most often an adult-onset sporadic acquired disorder characterized by progressive muscle stiffness with superimposed painful muscle spasms accompanied by electromyographic evidence of continuous motor activity at rest. SPS has been associated with autoimmune disorders, diabetes mellitus, thyrotoxicosis, and hypopituitarism with adrenal insufficiency (George et al., 1984). Approximately 60% of patients with SPS have antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD2, or GAD65; 138275), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting an immune-mediated pathogenesis (Folli et al., 1993). Approximately 10% of patients develop SPS as a paraneoplastic neurologic disorder associated with antibodies to amphiphysin (AMPH; 600418), an intracellular protein associated with neuronal synaptic vesicle endocytosis (Burns, 2005). See also congenital stiff-man syndrome, or hereditary hyperexplexia (149400), which is caused by mutations in subunits of the glycine receptor gene (GLRA1, 138491; GLRB, 138492). Meinck and Thompson (2002) provided a detailed review of stiff-person syndrome. They also discussed 2 possibly related conditions, progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity (PERM), a more severe disorder with other neurologic features, and stiff-limb or stiff-leg syndrome, a focal disorder.
Hereditary coproporphyria
MedGen UID:
57931
Concept ID:
C0162531
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) is an acute (hepatic) porphyria in which the acute symptoms are neurovisceral and occur in discrete episodes. Attacks typically start in the abdomen with low-grade pain that slowly increases over a period of days (not hours) with nausea progressing to vomiting. In some individuals, the pain is predominantly in the back or extremities. When an acute attack is untreated, a motor neuropathy may develop over a period of days or a few weeks. The neuropathy first appears as weakness proximally in the arms and legs, then progresses distally to involve the hands and feet. Some individuals experience respiratory insufficiency due to loss of innervation of the diaphragm and muscles of respiration. Acute attacks are associated commonly with use of certain medications, caloric deprivation, and changes in female reproductive hormones. About 20% of those with an acute attack also experience photosensitivity associated with bullae and skin fragility.
Acute intermittent porphyria
MedGen UID:
56452
Concept ID:
C0162565
Disease or Syndrome
Acute intermittent porphyria (referred to as AIP in this GeneReview) results from half-normal activity of the enzyme hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS). It is characterized clinically by life-threatening acute neurovisceral attacks of severe abdominal pain without peritoneal signs, often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, tachycardia, and hypertension. Attacks may be complicated by neurologic findings (mental changes, convulsions, and peripheral neuropathy that may progress to respiratory paralysis), and hyponatremia. Acute attacks, which may be provoked by certain drugs, alcoholic beverages, endocrine factors, calorie restriction, stress, and infections, usually resolve within two weeks. Most individuals with AIP have one or a few attacks; about 5% (mainly women) have recurrent attacks (defined as >4 attacks/year) that may persist for years. Other long-term complications are chronic renal failure, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and hypertension. Attacks, which are very rare before puberty, are more common in women than men. All individuals with a genetic change in the gene HMBS that predisposes to AIP are at risk of developing acute attacks; however, most never have symptoms and are said to have latent (or presymptomatic) AIP.
Subacute neuronopathic Gaucher's disease
MedGen UID:
78653
Concept ID:
C0268251
Disease or Syndrome
Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity.
Trimethylaminuria
MedGen UID:
83350
Concept ID:
C0342739
Disease or Syndrome
Trimethylaminuria is characterized by a fishy odor resembling that of rotten or decaying fish that results from excess excretion of trimethylamine in the urine, breath, sweat, and reproductive fluids. No physical symptoms are associated with trimethylaminuria. Affected individuals appear normal and healthy; however, the unpleasant odor often results in social and psychological problems. Symptoms are usually present from birth and may worsen during puberty. In females, symptoms are more severe just before and during menstruation, after taking oral contraceptives, and around the time of menopause.
Idiopathic basal ganglia calcification 1
MedGen UID:
97952
Concept ID:
C0393590
Disease or Syndrome
Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC) is a neurodegenerative disorder with characteristic calcium deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain areas visualized on neuroimaging. Most affected individuals are in good health during childhood and young adulthood and typically present in the fourth to fifth decade with gradually progressive neuropsychiatric and movement disorders. The main manifestations include clumsiness, fatigability, unsteady gait, slow or slurred speech, dysphagia, involuntary movements, or muscle cramping. Migraine is frequent and seizures of various types may also occur. Neuropsychiatric symptoms, often the first or most prominent manifestations, range from mild difficulty with concentration and memory to changes in personality and/or behavior, to psychosis and dementia.
Photomyoclonus, diabetes mellitus, deafness, nephropathy and cerebral dysfunction
MedGen UID:
315660
Concept ID:
C1809475
Disease or Syndrome
Ceroid lipofuscinosis neuronal 4B autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
320287
Concept ID:
C1834207
Disease or Syndrome
The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of inherited, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorders characterized by progressive intellectual and motor deterioration, seizures, and early death. Visual gvhmloss is a feature of most forms. Clinical phenotypes have been characterized traditionally according to the age of onset and order of appearance of clinical features into infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adult, and Northern epilepsy (also known as progressive epilepsy with mental retardation [EPMR]). There is however genetic and allelic heterogeneity; a proposed new nomenclature and classification system has been developed to take into account both the responsible gene and the age at disease onset; for example, CLN1 disease, infantile onset and CLN1 disease, juvenile onset are both caused by mutations in PPT1 but with differing age of onset. The most prevalent NCLs are CLN3 disease, classic juvenile and CLN2 disease, classic late infantile (although prevalence varies by ethnicity and country of family origin): CLN2 disease, classic late infantile. The first symptoms typically appear between age two and four years, usually starting with epilepsy, followed by regression of developmental milestones, myoclonic ataxia, and pyramidal signs. Visual impairment typically appears at age four to six years and rapidly progresses to light /dark awareness only. Life expectancy ranges from age six years to early teenage. CLN3 disease, classic juvenile. Onset is usually between ages four and ten years. Rapidly progressing visual loss resulting in severe visual impairment within one to two years is often the first clinical sign. Epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures and/or complex-partial seizures typically appears around age ten years. Life expectancy ranges from the late teens to the 30s. Other forms of NCL may present with behavior changes, epilepsy, visual impairment, or slowing of developmental progress and then loss of skills. The course may be extremely variable. Some genotype-phenotype information is available.
Myoclonic dystonia
MedGen UID:
331778
Concept ID:
C1834570
Disease or Syndrome
Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a movement disorder characterized by a combination of rapid, brief muscle contractions (myoclonus) and/or sustained twisting and repetitive movements that result in abnormal postures (dystonia). The myoclonic jerks typical of M-D most often affect the neck, trunk, and upper limbs with less common involvement of the legs. Approximately 50% of affected individuals have additional focal or segmental dystonia, presenting as cervical dystonia and/or writer's cramp. Non-motor features may include obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), depression, anxiety, personality disorders, alcohol abuse, and panic attacks. Symptom onset is usually in childhood or early adolescence but ranges from age six months to 80 years. Most affected adults report a dramatic reduction in myoclonus in response to alcohol ingestion. M-D is compatible with an active life of normal span.
Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions 1
MedGen UID:
371919
Concept ID:
C1834846
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. These phenotypes exemplify the diversity that can result from mutation of a given gene. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life up to about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, Parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called “chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus,” or “CPEO+”).
Spinocerebellar ataxia 27
MedGen UID:
373075
Concept ID:
C1836383
Disease or Syndrome
The hereditary ataxias are a group of genetic disorders characterized by slowly progressive incoordination of gait and often associated with poor coordination of hands, speech, and eye movements. Frequently, atrophy of the cerebellum occurs. In this GeneReview the hereditary ataxias are categorized by mode of inheritance and gene (or chromosomal locus) in which pathogenic variants occur.
Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions 3
MedGen UID:
373087
Concept ID:
C1836439
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is characterized by multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle. The most common clinical features include adult onset of weakness of the external eye muscles and exercise intolerance. Patients with C10ORF2-linked adPEO may have other clinical features including proximal muscle weakness, ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, cardiomyopathy, cataracts, depression, and endocrine abnormalities (summary by Fratter et al., 2010). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia, see PEOA1 (157640). PEO caused by mutations in the POLG gene are associated with more complicated phenotypes than those forms caused by mutations in the SLC25A4 (103220) or C10ORF2 genes (Lamantea et al., 2002).
Fragile X tremor/ataxia syndrome
MedGen UID:
333403
Concept ID:
C1839780
Disease or Syndrome
FMR1-related disorders include fragile X syndrome, fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), and FMR1-related primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). Fragile X syndrome occurs in individuals with an FMR1 full mutation or other loss-of-function mutation and is nearly always characterized by moderate intellectual disability in affected males and mild intellectual disability in affected females. Because FMR1 mutations are complex alterations involving non-classic gene-disrupting alterations (trinucleotide repeat expansion) and abnormal gene methylation, affected individuals occasionally have an atypical presentation with an IQ above 70, the traditional demarcation denoting intellectual disability (previously referred to as mental retardation). Males with an FMR1 full mutation accompanied by aberrant methylation may have a characteristic appearance (large head, long face, prominent forehead and chin, protruding ears), connective tissue findings (joint laxity), and large testes after puberty. Behavioral abnormalities, sometimes including autism spectrum disorder, are common. FXTAS occurs in males (and some females) who have an FMR1 premutation and is characterized by late-onset, progressive cerebellar ataxia and intention tremor. FMR1-related POI (age at cessation of menses <40 years) occurs in approximately 20% of females who have an FMR1 premutation.
Sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis
MedGen UID:
375302
Concept ID:
C1843851
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. These phenotypes exemplify the diversity that can result from mutation of a given gene. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life up to about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, Parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called “chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus,” or “CPEO+”).
MECP2 duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
337496
Concept ID:
C1846058
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
The MECP2 duplication syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by infantile hypotonia, delayed psychomotor development leading to severe intellectual disability, poor speech development, progressive spasticity, recurrent respiratory infections (in ~75% of affected individuals) and seizures (in ~50%). MECP2 duplication syndrome is 100% penetrant in males. Occasionally females have been described with a MECP2 duplication and related clinical findings, often associated with concomitant X-chromosomal abnormalities that prevent inactivation of the duplicated region. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures are most often observed; atonic seizures and absence seizures have also been described. One third of affected males are never able to walk independently. Almost 50% of affected males die before age 25 years, presumably from complications of recurrent infection and/or neurologic deterioration. In addition to the core features, autistic behaviors and gastrointestinal dysfunction have been observed in several affected boys. Although interfamilial phenotypic variability is observed, severity is usually consistent within families.
Spinocerebellar ataxia 17
MedGen UID:
337637
Concept ID:
C1846707
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17) is characterized by ataxia, dementia, and involuntary movements, including chorea and dystonia. Psychiatric symptoms, pyramidal signs, and rigidity are common. The age of onset ranges from three to 55 years. Individuals with full-penetrance alleles develop neurologic and/or psychiatric symptoms by age 50 years. Ataxia and psychiatric abnormalities are frequently the initial findings, followed by involuntary movement, parkinsonism, dementia, and pyramidal signs. Brain MRI shows variable atrophy of the cerebrum, brain stem, and cerebellum. The clinical features correlate with the length of the polyglutamine expansion but are not absolutely predictive of the clinical course.
Huntington disease-like 2
MedGen UID:
341120
Concept ID:
C1847987
Disease or Syndrome
Huntington disease-like 2 (HDL2) typically presents in midlife with a relentless progressive triad of movement, emotional, and cognitive abnormalities progressing to death over ten to 20 years. In some individuals the presentation resembles juvenile-onset Huntington disease (HD) or the Westphal variant of HD, usually presenting in the fourth decade (ages 29 to 41 years) with diminished coordination and weight loss despite increase in food intake. Neurologic abnormalities include parkinsonism (rigidity, bradykinesia, tremor), dysarthria, and hyperreflexia. In others the presentation is more variable but, in general, corresponds to typical HD.
Cerebellar ataxia infantile with progressive external ophthalmoplegia
MedGen UID:
340509
Concept ID:
C1850303
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. These phenotypes exemplify the diversity that can result from mutation of a given gene. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life up to about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, Parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called “chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus,” or “CPEO+”).
Ceroid lipofuscinosis neuronal 1
MedGen UID:
340540
Concept ID:
C1850451
Disease or Syndrome
The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of inherited, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorders characterized by progressive intellectual and motor deterioration, seizures, and early death. Visual gvhmloss is a feature of most forms. Clinical phenotypes have been characterized traditionally according to the age of onset and order of appearance of clinical features into infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adult, and Northern epilepsy (also known as progressive epilepsy with mental retardation [EPMR]). There is however genetic and allelic heterogeneity; a proposed new nomenclature and classification system has been developed to take into account both the responsible gene and the age at disease onset; for example, CLN1 disease, infantile onset and CLN1 disease, juvenile onset are both caused by mutations in PPT1 but with differing age of onset. The most prevalent NCLs are CLN3 disease, classic juvenile and CLN2 disease, classic late infantile (although prevalence varies by ethnicity and country of family origin): CLN2 disease, classic late infantile. The first symptoms typically appear between age two and four years, usually starting with epilepsy, followed by regression of developmental milestones, myoclonic ataxia, and pyramidal signs. Visual impairment typically appears at age four to six years and rapidly progresses to light /dark awareness only. Life expectancy ranges from age six years to early teenage. CLN3 disease, classic juvenile. Onset is usually between ages four and ten years. Rapidly progressing visual loss resulting in severe visual impairment within one to two years is often the first clinical sign. Epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures and/or complex-partial seizures typically appears around age ten years. Life expectancy ranges from the late teens to the 30s. Other forms of NCL may present with behavior changes, epilepsy, visual impairment, or slowing of developmental progress and then loss of skills. The course may be extremely variable. Some genotype-phenotype information is available.
Major affective disorder 1
MedGen UID:
377615
Concept ID:
C1852197
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency
MedGen UID:
377658
Concept ID:
C1852372
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive mitochondrial complex III deficiency is a severe multisystem disorder with onset at birth of lactic acidosis, hypotonia, hypoglycemia, failure to thrive, encephalopathy, and delayed psychomotor development. Visceral involvement, including hepatopathy and renal tubulopathy, may also occur. Many patients die in early childhood, but some may show longer survival (de Lonlay et al., 2001; De Meirleir et al., 2003). Genetic Heterogeneity of Mitochondrial Complex III Deficiency Mitochondrial complex III deficiency can be caused by mutation in several different nuclear-encoded genes. See MC3DN2 (615157), caused by mutation in the TTC19 gene (613814) on chromosome 17p12; MC3DN3 (615158), caused by mutation in the UQCRB gene (191330) on chromosome 8q; MC3DN4 (615159), caused by mutation in the UQCRQ gene (612080) on chromosome 5q31; MC3DN5 (615160), caused by mutation in the UQCRC2 gene (191329) on chromosome 16p12; MC3DN6 (615453), caused by mutation in the CYC1 gene (123980) on chromosome 8q24; MC3DN7 (615824), caused by mutation in the UQCC2 gene (614461) on chromosome 6p21; MC3DN8 (615838), caused by mutation in the LYRM7 gene (615831) on chromosome 5q23; and MC3DN9 (616111), caused by mutation in the UQCC3 gene (616097) on chromosome 11q12. See also MTYCB (516020) for a discussion of a milder phenotype associated with isolated mitochondrial complex III deficiency and mutations in a mitochondrial-encoded gene.
Parkinson disease 6, autosomal recessive early-onset
MedGen UID:
342982
Concept ID:
C1853833
Disease or Syndrome
The PINK1 type of young-onset Parkinson disease is characterized by variable combinations of rigidity, bradykinesia, and rest tremor, often making it clinically indistinguishable from idiopathic Parkinson disease. Lower-limb dystonia may be a presenting sign. Onset usually occurs in the third or fourth decade. The disease is slowly progressive. Clinical signs vary; hyperreflexia may be present and abnormal behavior and/or psychiatric manifestations have been described. Dyskinesias as a result of treatment with levodopa frequently occur, as with all individuals with young-onset disease, regardless of the underlying genetic cause.
Spinocerebellar ataxia 14
MedGen UID:
343106
Concept ID:
C1854369
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14) is characterized by slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, and nystagmus. Axial myoclonus, cognitive impairment, tremor, and sensory loss may also be observed. Parkinsonian features including rigidity and tremor have been described in some families. Findings seen in other ataxia disorders (e.g., dysphagia, dysphonia) may also occur in SCA14. Age of onset ranges from childhood to the sixth decade. Life span is not shortened.
Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids
MedGen UID:
341741
Concept ID:
C1857300
Disease or Syndrome
Adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP), which includes both hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) and pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD), is characterized by executive dysfunction, memory decline, personality changes, motor impairments, and seizures. A frontal lobe syndrome (e.g., loss of judgment, lack of social inhibitors, lack of insight, and motor persistence) usually appears early in the disease course. The mean age of onset is usually in the fourth decade. Affected individuals eventually become bedridden with spasticity and rigidity. The disease course ranges from two to 30 or more years (mean: 8 years).
Cushing's syndrome
MedGen UID:
347456
Concept ID:
C1857451
Disease or Syndrome
ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH) is an endogenous form of adrenal Cushing syndrome characterized by multiple bilateral adrenocortical nodules that cause a striking enlargement of the adrenal glands. Although some familial cases have been reported, the vast majority of AIMAH cases are sporadic. Patients typically present in the fifth and sixth decades of life, approximately 10 years later than most patients with other causes of Cushing syndrome (Swain et al., 1998; Christopoulos et al., 2005). Approximately 10 to 15% of adrenal Cushing syndrome is due to primary bilateral ACTH-independent adrenocortical pathology. The 2 main subtypes are AIMAH and primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD, see 610489), which is often a component of the Carney complex (160980) and associated with mutations in the PRKAR1A gene (188830) on chromosome 17q23-q24. AIMAH is rare, representing less than 1% of endogenous causes of Cushing syndrome (Swain et al., 1998; Christopoulos et al., 2005). See also ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (615830) due to somatic mutation in the PRKACA gene (601639). Cushing 'disease' (219090) is an ACTH-dependent disorder caused in most cases by pituitary adenomas that secrete excessive ACTH. Genetic Heterogeneity of ACTH-Independent Macronodular Adrenal Hyperplasia AIMAH2 (615954) is caused by germline mutation of 1 allele of the ARMC5 gene (615549) coupled with a somatic mutation in the other allele.
Spinocerebellar ataxia 12
MedGen UID:
347653
Concept ID:
C1858501
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 12 (SCA12) is characterized by onset of action tremor of the upper extremities in the fourth decade, slowly progressing to include ataxia and other cerebellar and cortical signs. Given the small number of individuals known to have SCA12, it is possible that other clinical manifestations have not yet been recognized.
Frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
MedGen UID:
350795
Concept ID:
C1862937
Disease or Syndrome
Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by adult onset of one or both of these features in an affected individual, with significant intrafamilial variation. The disorder is genetically and pathologically heterogeneous (summary by Vance et al., 2006). Patients with C9ORF72 repeat expansions tend to show a lower age of onset, shorter survival, bulbar symptom onset, increased incidence of neurodegenerative disease in relatives, and a propensity toward psychosis or hallucinations compared to patients with other forms of ALS and/or FTD (summary by Harms et al., 2013). Patients with C9ORF72 repeat expansions also show psychiatric disturbances that may predate the onset of dementia (Meisler et al., 2013; Gomez-Tortosa et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description of frontotemporal dementia, also known as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), see 600274. For a general discussion of motor neuron disease (MND), see amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-1 (ALS1; 105400). Genetic Heterogeneity of Frontotemporal Dementia and/or Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis See also FTDALS2 (615911), caused by mutation in the CHCHD10 gene (615903) on chromosome 22q11; FTDALS3 (616437), caused by mutation in the SQSTM1 gene (601530) on chromosome 5q35; and FTDALS4 (616439), caused by mutation in the TBK1 gene (604834) on chromosome 12q14.
Huntington disease-like 1
MedGen UID:
355137
Concept ID:
C1864112
Disease or Syndrome
Genetic prion diseases generally manifest with cognitive difficulties, ataxia, and myoclonus (abrupt jerking movements of muscle groups and/or entire limbs). The order of appearance and/or predominance of these features and other associated neurologic and psychiatric findings vary. Familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia (FFI) represent the core phenotypes of genetic prion disease. Note: A fourth clinical phenotype, known as Huntington disease like-1 (HDL-1) has been proposed, but this is based on a single report, and the underlying pathologic features would categorize it as GSS. Although it is clear that these four subtypes display overlapping clinical and pathologic features, recognition of these phenotypes can be useful when providing affected individuals and their families with information about the expected clinical course. The age at onset ranges from the third to ninth decade of life. The course ranges from a few months to several years (typically 5-7 years; in rare instances, >10 years).
Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 1
MedGen UID:
400627
Concept ID:
C1864846
Disease or Syndrome
Primary pigmented micronodular adrenocortical disease is a form of ACTH-independent adrenal hyperplasia resulting in Cushing syndrome. It is usually seen as a manifestation of the Carney complex (CNC1; 160980), a multiple neoplasia syndrome. However, PPNAD can also occur in isolation (Groussin et al., 2002). Genetic Heterogeneity of Primary Pigmented Micronodular Adrenocortical Disease See also PPNAD2 (610475), caused by mutation in the PDE11A gene (604961) on chromosome 2q31; PPNAD3 (614190), caused by mutation in the PDE8B gene (603390) on chromosome 5q13; and PPNAD4 (615830), caused by a duplication on chromosome 19p13 that includes the PRKACA gene (601639).
Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 2
MedGen UID:
355843
Concept ID:
C1864851
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia 4, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
401097
Concept ID:
C1866855
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia 4 (SPG4; also known as SPAST-associated HSP) is characterized by insidiously progressive bilateral lower-limb gait spasticity. More than 50% of affected individuals have some weakness in the legs and impaired vibration sense at the ankles. About one third have sphincter disturbances. Onset is insidious, mostly in young adulthood, although symptoms may start as early as age one year and as late as age 76 years. Intrafamilial variation is considerable.
Perry syndrome
MedGen UID:
357007
Concept ID:
C1868594
Disease or Syndrome
Perry syndrome is characterized by parkinsonism, hypoventilation, depression, and weight loss. The mean age at onset is 48 years; the mean disease duration is five years. Parkinsonism and psychiatric changes (depression, apathy, character changes, and withdrawal) tend to occur early; severe weight loss and hypoventilation manifest later.
Dystonia 12
MedGen UID:
358384
Concept ID:
C1868681
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of ATP1A3-related neurologic disorders includes rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP), alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC), and cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss (CAPOS) syndrome. While early reports emphasized the distinctness of RDP and AHC, it is increasingly evident that these conditions represent a spectrum related to mutation of ATP1A3. Because only ten individuals from three families and one individual with a de novo mutation have been described with CAPOS syndrome to date, its phenotype is less defined; however, some features overlap with RDP and AHC as well. RDP is characterized by abrupt onset of dystonia with parkinsonism (primarily bradykinesia and postural instability); a clear rostrocaudal (face>arm>leg) topological gradient of involvement; bulbar involvement; and absence of response to an adequate trial of L-dopa therapy. Often fever, physiologic stress, or alcoholic binges trigger the onset of symptoms. After their initial appearance, symptoms often stabilize with little improvement; occasionally second episodes occur with abrupt worsening of symptoms. Anxiety, depression, and seizures have been reported. Age of onset is four to 55 years. AHC is a complex neurodevelopmental syndrome most frequently manifesting in infancy or early childhood with paroxysmal episodic neurologic dysfunction including alternating hemiparesis or dystonia, quadriparesis, seizure-like episodes, and oculomotor abnormalities. Episodes can last for minutes, hours, days, or even weeks. Remission of symptoms occurs with sleep and immediately after awakening. Over time, persistent neurologic deficits develop in the majority of those affected, including oculomotor apraxia, ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, parkinsonism, and cognitive and behavioral dysfunction; more than 50% develop epilepsy in addition to their episodic movement disorder phenotype. CAPOS syndrome (a mnemonic for cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss) is characterized by episodes of ataxic encephalopathy and/or weakness after a febrile illness. Onset is between ages six months and five years. Some acute symptoms resolve; disease progression and severity vary.
Multiple sclerosis susceptibility 1
MedGen UID:
358269
Concept ID:
C1868685
Finding
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, demyelinating, neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) of unknown etiology. The peak onset is between age 20 and 40 years; it may develop in children and has also been identified in persons over age 60 years. Women are affected approximately twice as often as men. The most common clinical signs and symptoms, occurring in isolation or in combination, include sensory disturbance of the limbs (~30%), partial or complete visual loss (~15%), acute and subacute motor dysfunction of the limbs (~13%), diplopia (7%), and gait dysfunction (5%). The course may be relapsing-remitting or progressive, severe or mild, and may involve the entire neuroaxis in a widespread fashion or predominantly affect the spinal cord and optic nerves. The four clinical phenotypes of MS are: relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS) (initially occurring in more than 80% of individuals with MS); primary progressive MS (PP-MS) (occurring in 10%-20% of individuals with MS); progressive relapsing MS (PR-MS) (a rare form); and secondary progressive MS (SP-MS), to which approximately half of all persons diagnosed with RR-MS convert within a decade after the initial diagnosis.
Spinocerebellar ataxia 10
MedGen UID:
369786
Concept ID:
C1963674
Disease or Syndrome
SCA10 is characterized by slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia that usually starts as poor balance and unsteady gait, followed by upper-limb ataxia, scanning dysarthria, and dysphagia. The disease is exclusively found in Latin American populations, particularly those with Amerindian admixture. Abnormal tracking eye movements are common. Recurrent seizures after the onset of gait ataxia have been reported with variable frequencies among different families. Some individuals have cognitive dysfunction, behavioral disturbances, mood disorders, mild pyramidal signs, and peripheral neuropathy. Onset ranges from age 12 to 48 years.
Parkinson disease, late-onset
MedGen UID:
463618
Concept ID:
C3160718
Disease or Syndrome
Parkinsonism refers to all clinical states characterized by tremor, muscle rigidity, slowed movement (bradykinesia) and often postural instability. Parkinson disease is the primary and most common form of parkinsonism. Psychiatric manifestations, which include depression and visual hallucinations, are common but not uniformly present. Dementia eventually occurs in at least 20% of cases. The most common sporadic form of Parkinson disease manifests around age 60; however, young-onset and even juvenile presentations are seen.

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Köhler S, Buntinx F, Palmer K, van den Akker M
J Am Geriatr Soc 2015 Apr;63(4):692-8. doi: 10.1111/jgs.13357. PMID: 25900484
Leung CW, Epel ES, Willett WC, Rimm EB, Laraia BA
J Nutr 2015 Mar;145(3):622-7. Epub 2014 Dec 31 doi: 10.3945/jn.114.199414. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25733480
Zivin K, Yosef M, Miller EM, Valenstein M, Duffy S, Kales HC, Vijan S, Kim HM
J Psychosom Res 2015 Apr;78(4):324-31. Epub 2015 Feb 4 doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2015.01.014. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25697585
Menear M, Doré I, Cloutier AM, Perrier L, Roberge P, Duhoux A, Houle J, Fournier L
J Psychosom Res 2015 Apr;78(4):304-13. Epub 2014 Nov 20 doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2014.11.016. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25676334
Williams JA, Sink KM, Tooze JA, Atkinson HH, Cauley JA, Yaffe K, Tylavsky FA, Rubin SM, Simonsick EM, Kritchevsky SB, Houston DK
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2015 Jun;70(6):757-63. Epub 2014 Oct 18 doi: 10.1093/gerona/glu184. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25326643Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Köhler S, Buntinx F, Palmer K, van den Akker M
J Am Geriatr Soc 2015 Apr;63(4):692-8. doi: 10.1111/jgs.13357. PMID: 25900484
Leistner SM, Klotsche J, Dimopoulou C, Athanasoulia AP, Roemmler-Zehrer J, Pieper L, Schopohl J, Wittchen HU, Stalla GK, Fulda S, Sievers C
Eur J Endocrinol 2015 Jun;172(6):733-43. Epub 2015 Mar 19 doi: 10.1530/EJE-14-0941. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25792374
Zivin K, Yosef M, Miller EM, Valenstein M, Duffy S, Kales HC, Vijan S, Kim HM
J Psychosom Res 2015 Apr;78(4):324-31. Epub 2015 Feb 4 doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2015.01.014. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25697585
Menear M, Doré I, Cloutier AM, Perrier L, Roberge P, Duhoux A, Houle J, Fournier L
J Psychosom Res 2015 Apr;78(4):304-13. Epub 2014 Nov 20 doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2014.11.016. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25676334
Booth H, Khan O, Prevost AT, Reddy M, Charlton J, Gulliford MC; King׳s Bariatric Surgery Study Group
J Affect Disord 2015 Mar 15;174:644-9. Epub 2014 Dec 29 doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2014.12.050. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25577158

Therapy

Ryan J, Carrière I, Ritchie K, Ancelin ML
Brain Behav 2015 Mar;5(3):e00313. Epub 2015 Feb 8 doi: 10.1002/brb3.313. PMID: 25798330Free PMC Article
Titov N, Dear BF, Ali S, Zou JB, Lorian CN, Johnston L, Terides MD, Kayrouz R, Klein B, Gandy M, Fogliati VJ
Behav Ther 2015 Mar;46(2):193-205. Epub 2014 Oct 22 doi: 10.1016/j.beth.2014.09.008. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25645168
Lynch J, Moore M, Moss-Morris R, Kendrick T
J Affect Disord 2015 Mar 15;174:665-71. Epub 2014 Dec 11 doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2014.12.005. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25590645
Williams JA, Sink KM, Tooze JA, Atkinson HH, Cauley JA, Yaffe K, Tylavsky FA, Rubin SM, Simonsick EM, Kritchevsky SB, Houston DK
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2015 Jun;70(6):757-63. Epub 2014 Oct 18 doi: 10.1093/gerona/glu184. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25326643Free PMC Article
Müller R, Peter C, Cieza A, Post MW, Van Leeuwen CM, Werner CS, Geyh S; SwiSCI Study Group
Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2015 Mar;96(3):447-55. Epub 2014 Sep 28 doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2014.09.006. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25264110

Prognosis

Köhler S, Buntinx F, Palmer K, van den Akker M
J Am Geriatr Soc 2015 Apr;63(4):692-8. doi: 10.1111/jgs.13357. PMID: 25900484
Ryan J, Carrière I, Ritchie K, Ancelin ML
Brain Behav 2015 Mar;5(3):e00313. Epub 2015 Feb 8 doi: 10.1002/brb3.313. PMID: 25798330Free PMC Article
Zivin K, Yosef M, Miller EM, Valenstein M, Duffy S, Kales HC, Vijan S, Kim HM
J Psychosom Res 2015 Apr;78(4):324-31. Epub 2015 Feb 4 doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2015.01.014. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25697585
Tully PJ, Wardenaar KJ, Penninx BW
J Affect Disord 2015 Mar 15;174:611-8. Epub 2014 Dec 30 doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2014.12.045. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25577156
Williams JA, Sink KM, Tooze JA, Atkinson HH, Cauley JA, Yaffe K, Tylavsky FA, Rubin SM, Simonsick EM, Kritchevsky SB, Houston DK
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2015 Jun;70(6):757-63. Epub 2014 Oct 18 doi: 10.1093/gerona/glu184. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25326643Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Köhler S, Buntinx F, Palmer K, van den Akker M
J Am Geriatr Soc 2015 Apr;63(4):692-8. doi: 10.1111/jgs.13357. PMID: 25900484
Leistner SM, Klotsche J, Dimopoulou C, Athanasoulia AP, Roemmler-Zehrer J, Pieper L, Schopohl J, Wittchen HU, Stalla GK, Fulda S, Sievers C
Eur J Endocrinol 2015 Jun;172(6):733-43. Epub 2015 Mar 19 doi: 10.1530/EJE-14-0941. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25792374
Leung CW, Epel ES, Willett WC, Rimm EB, Laraia BA
J Nutr 2015 Mar;145(3):622-7. Epub 2014 Dec 31 doi: 10.3945/jn.114.199414. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25733480
Tully PJ, Wardenaar KJ, Penninx BW
J Affect Disord 2015 Mar 15;174:611-8. Epub 2014 Dec 30 doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2014.12.045. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25577156
Williams JA, Sink KM, Tooze JA, Atkinson HH, Cauley JA, Yaffe K, Tylavsky FA, Rubin SM, Simonsick EM, Kritchevsky SB, Houston DK
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2015 Jun;70(6):757-63. Epub 2014 Oct 18 doi: 10.1093/gerona/glu184. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25326643Free PMC Article

Recent systematic reviews

Menear M, Doré I, Cloutier AM, Perrier L, Roberge P, Duhoux A, Houle J, Fournier L
J Psychosom Res 2015 Apr;78(4):304-13. Epub 2014 Nov 20 doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2014.11.016. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25676334
Menear M, Doré I, Cloutier AM, Perrier L, Roberge P, Duhoux A, Houle J, Fournier L
J Psychosom Res 2015 Apr;78(4):314-23. Epub 2015 Jan 9 doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2015.01.001. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25649274
Daley AJ, Foster L, Long G, Palmer C, Robinson O, Walmsley H, Ward R
BJOG 2015 Jan;122(1):57-62. Epub 2014 Jun 17 doi: 10.1111/1471-0528.12909. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 24935560
Edward KL, Castle D, Mills C, Davis L, Casey J
Am J Mens Health 2015 Jan;9(1):26-34. Epub 2014 Mar 12 doi: 10.1177/1557988314526614. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 24626601
Hackett ML, Pickles K
Int J Stroke 2014 Dec;9(8):1017-25. Epub 2014 Aug 12 doi: 10.1111/ijs.12357. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25117911

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