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Results: 1 to 20 of 34

1.

Malignant tumor of prostate

The prostate is the gland below a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare in men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family history, being African-American, and some genetic changes. Symptoms of prostate cancer may include: -Problems passing urine, such as pain, difficulty starting or stopping the stream, or dribbling. -Low back pain. -Pain with ejaculation. Your doctor will diagnose prostate cancer by feeling the prostate through the wall of the rectum or doing a blood test for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Other tests include ultrasound, x-rays, or a biopsy. Treatment often depends on the stage of the cancer. How fast the cancer grows and how different it is from surrounding tissue helps determine the stage. Men with prostate cancer have many treatment options. The treatment that's best for one man may not be best for another. The options include watchful waiting, surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. You may have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
138169
Concept ID:
C0376358
Neoplastic Process
2.

Lytic lesion

Dissolution of bone that particularly involves the removal or loss of calcium. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
67445
Concept ID:
C0221204
Finding
3.

Osteolysis

Dissolution of bone; applied especially to the removal or loss of the calcium of bone. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
14532
Concept ID:
C0029435
Pathologic Function
4.

Prostate cancer

A cancer of the `prostate` (FMA:9600). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506673
Concept ID:
CN167851
Finding
5.

Osteolysis

Osteolysis refers to the destruction of bone through bone resorption with removal or loss of calcium. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505359
Concept ID:
CN002530
Finding
6.

Malignant neoplastic disease

Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body. . Cancer is not just one disease but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Most treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Some may involve hormone therapy, biologic therapy, or stem cell transplantation. . NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14297
Concept ID:
C0006826
Neoplastic Process
7.

Disease

Any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. The term is often used broadly to include injuries, disabilities, syndromes, symptoms, deviant behaviors, and atypical variations of structure and function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
4347
Concept ID:
C0012634
Disease or Syndrome
8.

disease

MedGen UID:
798428
Concept ID:
CN204926
Disease or Syndrome
9.

PC-K6a

Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis with the main clinical features of hypertrophic nail dystrophy, painful and highly debilitating plantar keratoderma, oral leukokeratosis, and a variety of epidermal cysts. Although the condition had previously been subdivided clinically into Jadassohn-Lewandowsky PC type 1 and Jackson-Lawler PC type 2, patients with PC were later found to have a mixed constellation of both types, leading to a classification of PC based on genotype (summary by Sybert, 2010; Eliason et al., 2012; McLean et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of pachyonychia congenita, see 167200. Historical Classification of Pachyonychia Congenita Gorlin et al. (1976) suggested that 2 distinct syndromes are subsumed under the designation pachyonychia congenita. PC type 1, the Jadassohn-Lewandowsky type, shows oral leukokeratosis. PC type 2, the Jackson-Lawler type, has natal teeth and epidermoid cysts (cylindromas), but no oral leukoplakia. Corneal dystrophy may be a feature exclusively of the Jackson-Lawler type. Smith et al. (1998) stated that PC type 2, in contrast to PC type 1, has minimal oral involvement and milder keratoderma, and multiple steatocystomas (184500) is a major clinical feature. Steatocystoma, also known as eruptive vellus cyst, is a cystic hamartoma lined by sebaceous ductal epithelium. On the basis of a study of 13 patients with PC type 1 or type 2, Terrinoni et al. (2001) concluded that the presence of pilosebaceous cysts following puberty is the best indicator of PC type 2; prepubescent patients are more difficult to classify due to the lack of cysts. Natal teeth are indicative of PC type 2, although their absence does not preclude the PC type 2 diagnosis. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
776873
Concept ID:
CN185878
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Related

MedGen UID:
619805
Concept ID:
C0445223
Finding
11.

Clinical Significance

A finding that has treatment or management implications for a patient's condition. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
417419
Concept ID:
C2826293
Finding
12.

Cell Invasion

The movement of one cell type into an area normally occupied by a different cell type. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
397081
Concept ID:
C2699153
Pathologic Function
13.

Cancer Progression

A pathologic process in which alterations at the molecular level result in a more aggressive cytologic and phenotypic profile and clinical course of a malignant neoplasm. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
364930
Concept ID:
C1947901
Neoplastic Process
14.

Prostate cancer metastatic

Prostate tumor cells spreading and reestablishing themselves in another organ. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
215232
Concept ID:
C0936223
Neoplastic Process
15.

Neoplasm Metastasis

The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another. A tumor formed by cells that have spread is called a "metastatic tumor" or a "metastasis." The metastatic tumor contains cells that are like those in the original (primary) tumor. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
45032
Concept ID:
C0027627
Neoplastic Process
16.

Male Urogenital Diseases

Pathological processes of the male URINARY TRACT and the reproductive system (GENITALIA, MALE). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
318601
Concept ID:
C1720894
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Disease Attributes

Clinical characteristics of disease or illness. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
199876
Concept ID:
C0752357
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Course of illness

Stages or progression of physical or mental disorders. Compare PROGNOSIS. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
116631
Concept ID:
C0242656
Pathologic Function
19.

Neoplasm of male genital organ

Tumor or cancer of the MALE GENITALIA. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
42196
Concept ID:
C0017417
Neoplastic Process
20.

Disorder of male genital organ

Pathological processes involving the male reproductive tract (GENITALIA, MALE). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
42195
Concept ID:
C0017412
Disease or Syndrome

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