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1.

Ichthyosis

Any of several generalized skin disorders characterized by dryness, roughness, and scaliness, due to hypertrophy of the stratum corneum epidermis. Most are genetic, but some are acquired, developing in association with other systemic disease or genetic syndrome. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7002
Concept ID:
C0020757
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
2.

Ichthyosis

An abnormality of the skin characterized the presence of excessive amounts of dry surface scales on the skin resulting from an abnormality of keratinization. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
429191
Concept ID:
CN007091
Finding
3.

Self-healing collodion baby

MedGen UID:
383772
Concept ID:
C1855789
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Anhidrosis, familial generalized, with abnormal or absent sweat glands

Inability to sweat. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
1550
Concept ID:
C0003028
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Self-healing collodion baby

Self-healing collodion baby (SHCB) is a minor variant of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI; see this term) characterized by the presence of a collodion membrane at birth that heals within the first weeks of life. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
797911
Concept ID:
CN202784
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis 1

Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) encompasses several forms of nonsyndromic ichthyosis. Although most neonates with ARCI are collodion babies, the clinical presentation and severity of ARCI may vary significantly, ranging from harlequin ichthyosis, the most severe and often fatal form, to lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and (nonbullous) congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE). These phenotypes are now recognized to fall on a continuum; however, the phenotypic descriptions are clinically useful for clarification of prognosis and management. Infants with harlequin ichthyosis are usually born prematurely and are encased in thick, hard, armor-like plates of cornified skin that severely restrict movement. Life-threatening complications in the immediate postnatal period include respiratory distress, feeding problems, and systemic infection. Collodion babies are born with a taut, shiny, translucent or opaque membrane that encases the entire body and lasts for days to weeks. LI and CIE are seemingly distinct phenotypes: classic, severe lamellar ichthyosis (LI) with dark brown, plate-like scale with no erythroderma and CIE with finer whiter scale and underlying generalized redness of the skin. Affected individuals with severe involvement can have ectropion, eclabium, scarring alopecia involving the scalp and eyebrows, and palmar and plantar keratoderma. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
760723
Concept ID:
C3536797
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
7.

Congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma

An ichthyosiform abnormality of the skin with congenital onset. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506069
Concept ID:
CN006510
Finding
8.

Anhidrosis

Inability to sweat. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504668
Concept ID:
CN000908
Finding
9.

Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis 8

Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a heterogeneous group of disorders of keratinization characterized primarily by abnormal skin scaling over the whole body. These disorders are limited to skin, with approximately two-thirds of patients presenting severe symptoms. The main skin phenotypes are lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and nonbullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (NCIE), although phenotypic overlap within the same patient or among patients from the same family can occur (summary by Fischer, 2009). Neither histopathologic findings nor ultrastructural features clearly distinguish between NCIE and LI. In addition, mutations in several genes have been shown to cause both lamellar and nonbullous ichthyosiform erythrodermal phenotypes (Akiyama et al., 2003). At the First Ichthyosis Consensus Conference in Soreze in 2009, the term 'autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis' (ARCI) was designated to encompass LI, NCIE, and harlequin ichthyosis (ARCI4B; 242500) (Oji et al., 2010). NCIE is characterized by prominent erythroderma and fine white, superficial, semiadherent scales. Most patients present with collodion membrane at birth and have palmoplantar keratoderma, often with painful fissures, digital contractures, and loss of pulp volume. In half of the cases, a nail dystrophy including ridging, subungual hyperkeratosis, or hypoplasia has been described. Ectropion, eclabium, scalp involvement, and loss of eyebrows and lashes seem to be more frequent in NCIE than in lamellar ichthyosis (summary by Fischer et al., 2000). In LI, the scales are large, adherent, dark, and pigmented with no skin erythema. Overlapping phenotypes may depend on the age of the patient and the region of the body. The terminal differentiation of the epidermis is perturbed in both forms, leading to a reduced barrier function and defects of lipid composition in the stratum corneum (summary by Lefevre et al., 2006). In later life, the skin in ARCI may have scales that cover the entire body surface, including the flexural folds, and the scales are highly variable in size and color. Erythema may be very mild and almost invisible. Some affected persons exhibit scarring alopecia, and many have secondary anhidrosis (summary by Eckl et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis, see ARCI1 (242300). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462727
Concept ID:
C3151377
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Congenital nonbullous ichthyosiform erythroderma

MedGen UID:
400900
Concept ID:
C1866030
Finding
11.

Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis 4A

Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) encompasses several forms of nonsyndromic ichthyosis. Although most neonates with ARCI are collodion babies, the clinical presentation and severity of ARCI may vary significantly, ranging from harlequin ichthyosis, the most severe and often fatal form, to lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and (nonbullous) congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE). These phenotypes are now recognized to fall on a continuum; however, the phenotypic descriptions are clinically useful for clarification of prognosis and management. Infants with harlequin ichthyosis are usually born prematurely and are encased in thick, hard, armor-like plates of cornified skin that severely restrict movement. Life-threatening complications in the immediate postnatal period include respiratory distress, feeding problems, and systemic infection. Collodion babies are born with a taut, shiny, translucent or opaque membrane that encases the entire body and lasts for days to weeks. LI and CIE are seemingly distinct phenotypes: classic, severe lamellar ichthyosis (LI) with dark brown, plate-like scale with no erythroderma and CIE with finer whiter scale and underlying generalized redness of the skin. Affected individuals with severe involvement can have ectropion, eclabium, scarring alopecia involving the scalp and eyebrows, and palmar and plantar keratoderma. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
371355
Concept ID:
C1832550
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
12.

Dry skin

MedGen UID:
368099
Concept ID:
C1963094
Finding
13.

Mild

Mild; asymptomatic or mild symptoms; clinical or diagnostic observations only; intervention not indicated. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
268697
Concept ID:
C1513302
Finding
14.

Congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma

An ichthyosiform abnormality of the skin with congenital onset. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
86936
Concept ID:
C0079583
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Neonatal hemochromatosis

Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is characterized by hepatic failure in the newborn period and heavy iron staining in the liver. In addition, there is marked siderosis of extrahepatic tissues, including the heart and pancreas (Driscoll et al., 1988). Whitington (2007) postulated that some cases of neonatal hemochromatosis result from maternal alloimmunity directed at the fetal liver, and therefore do not represent an inherited mendelian disorder. Other causes may result from metabolic disease or perinatal infection. In particular, he commented that the disorder is not related to the family of inherited liver diseases that fall under the classification of hereditary hemochromatosis (see, e.g., 235200). Whitington (2007) proposed the term 'congenital alloimmune hepatitis.' In the past, the disorder has loosely been labeled 'neonatal hepatitis' and 'giant cell hepatitis,' which are pathologic findings in the liver representing a common response to a variety of insults, including cholestatic disorders and infection, among others (Fawaz et al., 1975; Knisely et al., 1987; Kelly et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82768
Concept ID:
C0268059
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Hereditary palmoplantar keratoderma

Hyperkeratosis affecting the palm of the hand and the sole of the foot. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
44017
Concept ID:
C0022596
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Congenital ichthyosis of skin

Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) encompasses several forms of nonsyndromic ichthyosis. Although most neonates with ARCI are collodion babies, the clinical presentation and severity of ARCI may vary significantly, ranging from harlequin ichthyosis, the most severe and often fatal form, to lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and (nonbullous) congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE). These phenotypes are now recognized to fall on a continuum; however, the phenotypic descriptions are clinically useful for clarification of prognosis and management. Infants with harlequin ichthyosis are usually born prematurely and are encased in thick, hard, armor-like plates of cornified skin that severely restrict movement. Life-threatening complications in the immediate postnatal period include respiratory distress, feeding problems, and systemic infection. Collodion babies are born with a taut, shiny, translucent or opaque membrane that encases the entire body and lasts for days to weeks. LI and CIE are seemingly distinct phenotypes: classic, severe lamellar ichthyosis (LI) with dark brown, plate-like scale with no erythroderma and CIE with finer whiter scale and underlying generalized redness of the skin. Affected individuals with severe involvement can have ectropion, eclabium, scarring alopecia involving the scalp and eyebrows, and palmar and plantar keratoderma. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
43813
Concept ID:
C0020758
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
18.

Disorder of skin

Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin. -Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration. -Keeps harmful microbes out, preventing infections. -Helps you feel things like heat, cold, and pain. -Keeps your body temperature even. -Makes vitamin D when the sun shines on it. Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, and itching. Allergies, irritants, your genetic makeup, and certain diseases and immune system problems can cause rashes, hives, and other skin conditions. Many skin problems, such as acne, also affect your appearance. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20777
Concept ID:
C0037274
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Abnormality of the skin

An abnormality of the skin. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
11449
Concept ID:
C0037268
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
20.

Ichthyosis lamellar, recessive

MedGen UID:
449125
Concept ID:
CN073006
Disease or Syndrome
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