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1.

Malignant tumor of prostate

The prostate is the gland below a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare in men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family history, being African-American, and some genetic changes. Symptoms of prostate cancer may include: -Problems passing urine, such as pain, difficulty starting or stopping the stream, or dribbling. -Low back pain. -Pain with ejaculation. Your doctor will diagnose prostate cancer by feeling the prostate through the wall of the rectum or doing a blood test for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Other tests include ultrasound, x-rays, or a biopsy. Treatment often depends on the stage of the cancer. How fast the cancer grows and how different it is from surrounding tissue helps determine the stage. Men with prostate cancer have many treatment options. The treatment that's best for one man may not be best for another. The options include watchful waiting, surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. You may have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
138169
Concept ID:
C0376358
Neoplastic Process
2.

Prostate cancer

A cancer of the prostate. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506673
Concept ID:
CN167851
Finding
3.

sulforafan

An isothiocyanate with a methylsulphinyl butane chain. The chemical structure is CS(=O)CCCCN=C=S. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
58034
Concept ID:
C0163159
Pharmacologic Substance
4.

Androgens

A class of sex hormones associated with the development and maintenance of the secondary male sex characteristics, sperm induction, and sexual differentiation. In addition to increasing virility and libido, they also increase nitrogen and water retention and stimulate skeletal growth. (MeSH) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
8060
Concept ID:
C0002844
Pharmacologic Substance
5.

Malignant Neoplasm

Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body. . Cancer is not just one disease but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Most treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Some may involve hormone therapy, biologic therapy, or stem cell transplantation. . NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14297
Concept ID:
C0006826
Neoplastic Process
6.

Acetylation

A chemical reaction in which a small molecule called an acetyl group is added to other molecules. Acetylation of proteins may affect how they act in the body. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7840
Concept ID:
C0001038
Molecular Function
7.

Visual Suppression

MedGen UID:
526147
Concept ID:
C0221103
Pathologic Function
8.

Deacetylation

Deacetylation is the covalent chemical or post-translational biochemical addition of an acetyl group(s) to a peptide or protein. (NCI) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
268332
Concept ID:
C1511737
Molecular Function
9.

Disease regression

Return to a former state; a subsidence of the symptoms of a disease process; in cancer, a decrease in the size of a tumor or in the extent of cancer in the body. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
195771
Concept ID:
C0684320
Pathologic Function
10.

Signal Transduction Pathways

Describes a group of molecules in a cell that work together to control one or more cell functions, such as cell division or cell death. After the first molecule in a pathway receives a signal, it activates another molecule. This process is repeated until the last molecule is activated and the cell function involved is carried out. Abnormal activation of signaling pathways can lead to cancer, and drugs are being developed to block these pathways. This may help block cancer cell growth and kill cancer cells. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
39530
Concept ID:
C0086982
Molecular Function
11.

Inhibition

MedGen UID:
5809
Concept ID:
C0021469
Molecular Function
12.

Male Urogenital Diseases

Pathological processes of the male URINARY TRACT and the reproductive system (GENITALIA, MALE). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
318601
Concept ID:
C1720894
Disease or Syndrome
13.

thiocyanate

MedGen UID:
65114
Concept ID:
C0220926
Pharmacologic Substance
14.

Male Reproductive System Neoplasm

Tumor or cancer of the MALE GENITALIA. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
42196
Concept ID:
C0017417
Neoplastic Process
15.

Disorder of male genital organ

Pathological processes involving the male reproductive tract (GENITALIA, MALE). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
42195
Concept ID:
C0017412
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Anticarcinogenic Agents

Agents that reduce the frequency or rate of spontaneous or induced tumors independently of the mechanism involved. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
38807
Concept ID:
C0085169
Pharmacologic Substance
17.

Genitourinary neoplasm

Tumors or cancer of the UROGENITAL SYSTEM in either the male or the female. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
22583
Concept ID:
C0042065
Neoplastic Process
18.

Protective Agents

A class of agents used in prophylactic or curative therapy to attenuate the negative side effects of toxins or drugs. Protective agents belong to various chemical classes, acting through various pharmacological mechanisms. They may neutralize exogenous poisons, coat mucosa for protection against physical or chemical damage, offer antioxidant protection against free radicals or ionizing radiation, or induce endogenous detoxifying enzymes. (NCI04) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
19516
Concept ID:
C0033613
Pharmacologic Substance
19.

Prostate Neoplasm

A benign, borderline, or malignant neoplasm that affects the prostate gland. Representative examples include benign prostate phyllodes tumor, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, prostate carcinoma, and prostate sarcoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
18697
Concept ID:
C0033578
Neoplastic Process
20.

Disorder of prostate

The prostate is a gland. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine away from the bladder and out of the body. A young man's prostate is about the size of a walnut. It slowly grows larger with age. If it gets too large, it can cause problems. This is very common after age 50. The older men get, the more likely they are to have prostate trouble. Some common problems are: - Prostatitis - an infection, usually caused by bacteria. - Benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH - an enlarged prostate, which may cause dribbling after urination or a need to go often, especially at night. - Prostate cancer - a common cancer that responds best to treatment when detected early. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10964
Concept ID:
C0033575
Disease or Syndrome

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