Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 33

1.

Cognitive impairment

MedGen UID:
383844
Concept ID:
C1856145
Finding
2.

Mild

Mild; asymptomatic or mild symptoms; clinical or diagnostic observations only; intervention not indicated. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
268697
Concept ID:
C1513302
Finding
3.

Cognitive impairment

a condition where a person has problems with the ability to think and learn [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
90932
Concept ID:
C0338656
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
4.

Alzheimer disease

Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by dementia that typically begins with subtle and poorly recognized failure of memory and slowly becomes more severe and, eventually, incapacitating. Other common findings include confusion, poor judgment, language disturbance, agitation, withdrawal, and hallucinations. Occasionally, seizures, Parkinsonian features, increased muscle tone, myoclonus, incontinence, and mutism occur. Death usually results from general inanition, malnutrition, and pneumonia. The typical clinical duration of the disease is eight to ten years, with a range from one to 25 years. Approximately 25% of all AD is familial (i.e., =2 persons in a family have AD) of which approximately 95% is late onset (age >60-65 years) and 5% is early onset (age <65 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1853
Concept ID:
C0002395
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Dementia

Dementia is the name for a group of symptoms caused by disorders that affect the brain. It is not a specific disease. People with dementia may not be able to think well enough to do normal activities, such as getting dressed or eating. They may lose their ability to solve problems or control their emotions. Their personalities may change. They may become agitated or see things that are not there. . Memory loss is a common symptom of dementia. However, memory loss by itself does not mean you have dementia. People with dementia have serious problems with two or more brain functions, such as memory and language. Although dementia is common in very elderly people, it is not part of normal aging. Many different diseases can cause dementia, including Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Drugs are available to treat some of these diseases. While these drugs cannot cure dementia or repair brain damage, they may improve symptoms or slow down the disease. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
99229
Concept ID:
C0497327
Finding; Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
6.

Atrophy

Decrease in the size of a cell, tissue, organ, or multiple organs, associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as abnormal cellular changes, ischemia, malnutrition, or hormonal changes. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
83084
Concept ID:
C0333641
Pathologic Function
7.

Hypertension

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is called diastolic pressure. . Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually the systolic number comes before or above the diastolic number. A reading of. -119/79 or lower is normal blood pressure. -140/90 or higher is high blood pressure. -Between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number is called prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure. You can control high blood pressure through healthy lifestyle habits such as exercise and the DASH diet and taking medicines, if needed. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6969
Concept ID:
C0020538
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Hypertension

A finding of increased blood pressure; not necessarily hypertensive disorder [from SNOMED CT]

MedGen UID:
635666
Concept ID:
C0497247
Finding
9.

Steppage gait

An abnormal gait pattern that arises from weakness of the pretibial and peroneal muscles due to a lower motor neuron lesion. Affected patients have footdrop and are unable to dorsiflex and evert the foot. The leg is lifted high on walking so that the toes clear the ground, and there may be a slapping noise when the foot strikes the ground again. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505526
Concept ID:
CN003047
Finding
10.

Dementia

A loss of global cognitive ability of sufficient amount to interfere with normal social or occupational function. Dementia represents a loss of previously present cognitive abilities, generally in adults, and can affect memory, thinking, language, judgment, and behavior. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504574
Concept ID:
CN000683
Finding
11.

Folate deficiency

A reduced concentration of folic acid, which is also known as vitamin B9. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
451856
Concept ID:
CN117400
Finding
12.

Abnormality of the cardiovascular system

Any abnormality of the cardiovascular system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
427888
Concept ID:
CN001481
Finding
13.

Waddling gait

MedGen UID:
66667
Concept ID:
C0231712
Finding; Sign or Symptom
14.

Disorder of cardiovascular system

Any abnormality of the cardiovascular system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2848
Concept ID:
C0007222
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Tauopathy

Neurodegenerative disorders involving deposition of abnormal tau protein isoforms (TAU PROTEINS) in neurons and glial cells in the brain. Pathological aggregations of tau proteins are associated with mutation of the tau gene on chromosome 17 in patients with ALZHEIMER DISEASE; DEMENTIA; PARKINSONIAN DISORDERS; progressive supranuclear palsy (SUPRANUCLEAR PALSY, PROGRESSIVE); and corticobasal degeneration. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181880
Concept ID:
C0949664
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Hyperhomocysteinemia

Hyperhomocysteinemia refers to above-normal concentrations of plasma/serum homocysteine. Plasma/serum homocysteine is the sum of the thiol-containing amino acid homocysteine and the homocysteinyl moiety of the disulfides homocystine and cysteine-homocysteine, whether free or bound to proteins (Malinow and Stampfer, 1994). Hyperhomocysteinemia in isolation may be associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and recurrent arterial and venous thrombosis usually in the third or fourth decade of life (review by Welch and Loscalzo, 1998). Homocysteinemia is also a feature of several inherited metabolic disorders, including homocystinuria (236200), due to mutation in the CBS gene (613381), and N(5,10)-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency (236250), caused by mutation in the MTHFR gene (607093). Homocysteinemia/homocystinuria and megaloblastic anemia can result from defects in vitamin B12 (cobalamin; cbl) metabolism, which have been classified according to complementation groups of cells in vitro; see cblE (236270) and cblG (250940). See also the various forms of combined methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) and homocystinuria due to disorders of cobalamin: cblC (277400), cblD (277410), and cblF (277380). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
108623
Concept ID:
C0598608
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Dyslipidemia

An abnormality in the of lipid metabolism. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
66067
Concept ID:
C0242339
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Disorder of lipid metabolism

An inherited metabolic disorder that affects the metabolism of the lipids. Representative examples include Gaucher disease, Tay-Sachs disease, and Niemann-Pick disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
57587
Concept ID:
C0154251
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Malnutrition

Food provides the energy and nutrients you need to be healthy. If you don't get enough nutrients -- including proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, and minerals - you may suffer from malnutrition. Causes of malnutrition include:. -Lack of specific nutrients in your diet. Even the lack of one vitamin can lead to malnutrition. -An unbalanced diet. -Certain medical problems, such as malabsorption syndromes and cancers. Symptoms may include fatigue, dizziness, and weight loss. Or, you may have no symptoms. To diagnose the cause of the problem, your doctor may do blood tests and a nutritional assessment. Treatment may include replacing the missing nutrients and treating the underlying cause.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
56429
Concept ID:
C0162429
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...