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Results: 1 to 20 of 64

1.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Complete trisomy 21 syndrome

Down syndrome, the most frequent form of mental retardation caused by a microscopically demonstrable chromosomal aberration, is characterized by well-defined and distinctive phenotypic features and natural history. It is caused by triplicate state (trisomy) of all or a critical portion of chromosome 21. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
4385
Concept ID:
C0013080
Congenital Abnormality
3.

Stenosis of duodenum

Narrowing of the lumen of the duodenum. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
66761
Concept ID:
C0238093
Anatomical Abnormality
4.

Trisomy

The possession of a third chromosome of any one type in an otherwise diploid cell. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
21702
Concept ID:
C0041107
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. There are different types of leukemia, including: -Acute lymphocytic leukemia. -Acute myeloid leukemia. -Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. -Chronic myeloid leukemia. Leukemia can develop quickly or slowly. Chronic leukemia grows slowly. In acute leukemia, the cells are very abnormal and their number increases rapidly. Adults can get either type; childen with leukemia most often have an acute type.Some leukemias can often be cured. Other types are hard to cure, but you can often control them. Treatments may include chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplantation. Even if symptoms disappear, you might need therapy to prevent a relapse. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9725
Concept ID:
C0023418
Neoplastic Process
6.

Intellectual functioning disability

A developmental disorder characterized by less than average intelligence and significant limitations in adaptive behavior with onset before the age of 18. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7544
Concept ID:
C0025362
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
7.

Hirschsprung's disease

Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or congenital intestinal aganglionosis, is a birth defect characterized by complete absence of neuronal ganglion cells from a portion of the intestinal tract. The aganglionic segment includes the distal rectum and a variable length of contiguous proximal intestine. In 80% of individuals, aganglionosis is restricted to the rectosigmoid colon (short-segment disease); in 15%-20%, aganglionosis extends proximal to the sigmoid colon (long-segment disease); in about 5%, aganglionosis affects the entire large intestine (total colonic aganglionosis). Rarely, the aganglionosis extends into the small bowel or even more proximally to encompass the entire bowel (total intestinal aganglionosis). HSCR is considered a neurocristopathy, a disorder of cells and tissues derived from the neural crest, and may occur as an isolated finding or as part of a multisystem disorder. Affected infants frequently present in the first two months of life with symptoms of impaired intestinal motility such as failure to pass meconium within the first 48 hours of life, constipation, emesis, abdominal pain or distention, and occasionally diarrhea. However, because the initial diagnosis of HSCR may be delayed until late childhood or adulthood, HSCR should be considered in anyone with lifelong severe constipation. Individuals with HSCR are at risk for enterocolitis and/or potentially lethal intestinal perforation. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
5559
Concept ID:
C0019569
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by dementia that typically begins with subtle and poorly recognized failure of memory and slowly becomes more severe and, eventually, incapacitating. Other common findings include confusion, poor judgment, language disturbance, agitation, withdrawal, and hallucinations. Occasionally, seizures, Parkinsonian features, increased muscle tone, myoclonus, incontinence, and mutism occur. Death usually results from general inanition, malnutrition, and pneumonia. The typical clinical duration of the disease is eight to ten years, with a range from one to 25 years. Approximately 25% of all AD is familial (i.e., =2 persons in a family have AD) of which approximately 95% is late onset (age >60-65 years) and 5% is early onset (age <65 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1853
Concept ID:
C0002395
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Hirschsprung disease

MedGen UID:
808155
Concept ID:
CN221585
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Trisomy 21

A chromosomal abnormality consisting of the presence of a third copy of chromosome 21 in somatic cells. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
760825
Concept ID:
C3537167
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
11.

Acquired stenosis

MedGen UID:
507599
Concept ID:
C0009814
Pathologic Function
12.

Acute megakaryocytic leukemia

MedGen UID:
505962
Concept ID:
CN005861
Finding
13.

Myeloproliferative disorder

Proliferation (excess production) of hemopoietically active tissue or of tissue which has embryonic hemopoietic potential. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505828
Concept ID:
CN004913
Finding
14.

Alzheimer disease

A degenerative disease of the brain characterized by the insidious onset of dementia. Impairment of memory, judgment, attention span, and problem solving skills are followed by severe apraxia and a global loss of cognitive abilities. The condition primarily occurs after age 60, and is marked pathologically by severe cortical atrophy and the triad of senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuropil threads. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505259
Concept ID:
CN002282
Finding
15.

Aganglionic megacolon

An abnormality resulting from a lack of intestinal ganglion cells (i.e., an aganglionic section of bowel) that results in bowel obstruction with enlargement of the colon. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505171
Concept ID:
CN002042
Finding
16.

Anal atresia

Congenital absence of the anus, i.e., the opening at the bottom end of the intestinal tract. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505058
Concept ID:
CN001831
Finding
17.

Leukemia

A cancer of the blood and bone marrow characterized by an abnormal proliferation of leukocytes. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505002
Concept ID:
CN001727
Finding
18.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
449826

19.

Hirschsprung disease 1

Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or congenital intestinal aganglionosis, is a birth defect characterized by complete absence of neuronal ganglion cells from a portion of the intestinal tract. The aganglionic segment includes the distal rectum and a variable length of contiguous proximal intestine. In 80% of individuals, aganglionosis is restricted to the rectosigmoid colon (short-segment disease); in 15%-20%, aganglionosis extends proximal to the sigmoid colon (long-segment disease); in about 5%, aganglionosis affects the entire large intestine (total colonic aganglionosis). Rarely, the aganglionosis extends into the small bowel or even more proximally to encompass the entire bowel (total intestinal aganglionosis). HSCR is considered a neurocristopathy, a disorder of cells and tissues derived from the neural crest, and may occur as an isolated finding or as part of a multisystem disorder. Affected infants frequently present in the first two months of life with symptoms of impaired intestinal motility such as failure to pass meconium within the first 48 hours of life, constipation, emesis, abdominal pain or distention, and occasionally diarrhea. However, because the initial diagnosis of HSCR may be delayed until late childhood or adulthood, HSCR should be considered in anyone with lifelong severe constipation. Individuals with HSCR are at risk for enterocolitis and/or potentially lethal intestinal perforation. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
447474
Concept ID:
CN030431
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Malformation of the heart and great vessels

Congenital malformation of the heart or great vessels (i.e., the large blood vesslesentering and leaving the heart: aorta, the pulmonary arteries and veins, and the superior and inferior vena cava). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
428300
Concept ID:
CN002327
Finding

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