Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Results: 6

1.

Oxidative Stress

A condition in which antioxidant levels are lower than normal. Antioxidant levels are usually measured in blood plasma. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
66929
Concept ID:
C0242606
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
2.

Memory impairment

MedGen UID:
368424
Concept ID:
C1963167
Finding
3.

Impairment

Loss or abnormality of psychological, physiological, or anatomic structure or function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
151925
Concept ID:
C0684336
Pathologic Function
4.

Memory impairment

Deterioration in memory function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
68579
Concept ID:
C0233794
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
5.

Stress

Everyone feels stressed from time to time. Not all stress is bad. All animals have a stress response, and it can be life-saving. But chronic stress can cause both physical and mental harm. There are at least three different types of stress:: -Routine stress related to the pressures of work, family, and other daily responsibilities. -Stress brought about by a sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or illness. -Traumatic stress, which happens when you are in danger of being seriously hurt or killed. Examples include a major accident, war, assault, or a natural disaster. This type of stress can cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Different people may feel stress in different ways. Some people experience digestive symptoms. Others may have headaches, sleeplessness, depressed mood, anger, and irritability. People under chronic stress get more frequent and severe viral infections, such as the flu or common cold. Vaccines, such as the flu shot, are less effective for them. Some people cope with stress more effectively than others. It's important to know your limits when it comes to stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20971
Concept ID:
C0038435
Finding
6.

Silybum marianum extract

A substance derived from any of several Old World coarse prickly-leaved shrubs and subshrubs including the plant Silybum marianum. Milk thistle's active chemical component is silymarin, which is a combination of flavonoids such as silibinin, dehydrosilibinin, silychristin and silydianin. These compounds are antioxidants and may alter the membrane structure of the liver cell, thereby blocking the absorption of toxins; they may also stimulate the production of new liver cells. In addition, milk thistle may increase cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels, exhibiting dose-dependent cardiac myocyte cytoprotection against doxorubicin. The silibinin component of milk thistle has been shown to inhibit growth factor receptor-mediated mitogenic and cell survival signaling, thereby inhibiting tumor growth. (NCI04) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
182629
Concept ID:
C0937640
Pharmacologic Substance

Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...