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Results: 1 to 20 of 21

1.

Inhalational anthrax

MedGen UID:
57841
Concept ID:
C0155866
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Glutamic Acid

One of twenty amino acids (molecules that join together to form proteins). Glutamic acid may help nerve cells send and receive information from other cells. It is being studied for its ability to decrease or prevent nerve damage caused by anticancer drugs. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
29630
Concept ID:
C0061472
Pharmacologic Substance
3.

Anthrax

Anthrax is a disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, a germ that lives in soil. Many people know about it from the 2001 bioterror attacks. In the attacks, someone purposely spread anthrax through the U.S. mail. This killed five people and made 22 sick. . Anthrax is rare. It affects animals such as cattle, sheep, and goats more often than people. People can get anthrax from contact with infected animals, wood, meat, or hides. It can cause three forms of disease in people. They are: - Cutaneous, which affects the skin. People with cuts or open sores can get it if they touch the bacteria. . - Inhalation, which affects the lungs. You can get this if you breathe in spores of the bacteria. . - Gastrointestinal, which affects the digestive system. You can get it by eating infected meat. Antibiotics often cure anthrax if it is diagnosed early. But many people don't know they have anthrax until it is too late to treat. A vaccine to prevent anthrax is available for people in the military and others at high risk. . NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8110
Concept ID:
C0003175
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Infection

Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
811352
Concept ID:
C3714514
Pathologic Function
5.

Septicemia

Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
48626
Concept ID:
C0036690
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Infection

Unknown contamination with disease-producing germs. [from HHCC]

MedGen UID:
43874
Concept ID:
C0021311
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Septic Toxemia

A condition produced by the presence of toxins or other harmful substances in the BLOOD. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
21222
Concept ID:
C0040524
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Diagnosis

The process of identifying a disease, such as cancer, from its signs and symptoms. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
8354
Concept ID:
C0011900
Finding
9.

Edema

Edema means swelling caused by fluid in your body's tissues. It usually occurs in the feet, ankles and legs, but it can involve your entire body. Causes of edema include: -Eating too much salt. -Sunburn. -Heart failure. -Kidney disease. -Liver problems from cirrhosis. -Pregnancy. -Problems with lymph nodes, especially after mastectomy. -Some medicines. -Standing or walking a lot when the weather is warm. To keep swelling down, your health care provider may recommend keeping your legs raised when sitting, wearing support stockings, limiting how much salt you eat, or taking a medicine called a diuretic - also called a water pill. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4451
Concept ID:
C0013604
Pathologic Function
10.

Communicable Diseases

Infectious diseases kill more people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living things that are found everywhere - in air, soil and water. You can get infected by touching, eating, drinking or breathing something that contains a germ. Germs can also spread through animal and insect bites, kissing and sexual contact. Vaccines, proper hand washing and medicines can help prevent infections. . There are four main kinds of germs: : - Bacteria - one-celled germs that multiply quickly and may release chemicals which can make you sick. - Viruses - capsules that contain genetic material, and use your own cells to multiply. - Fungi - primitive plants, like mushrooms or mildew . - Protozoa - one-celled animals that use other living things for food and a place to live. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1057
Concept ID:
C0009450
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Bacteremia

A laboratory test result that indicates the presence of bacteria in the blood. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
482
Concept ID:
C0004610
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Edema

An abnormal accumulation of fluid beneath the skin, or in one or more cavities of the body. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504667
Concept ID:
CN000907
Finding
13.

Primary cortisol resistance

MedGen UID:
443921
Concept ID:
C2930863
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Onset

The start, beginning, or early stages. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
87142
Concept ID:
C0332162
15.

Charbon brand of activated charcoal

MedGen UID:
289013
Concept ID:
C1564679
Pharmacologic Substance
16.

Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections

Infections caused by bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain (positive) when treated by the gram-staining method. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
39283
Concept ID:
C0085426
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Bacillaceae Infections

Infections with bacteria of the family BACILLACEAE. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
39271
Concept ID:
C0085389
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese. But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli. Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14012
Concept ID:
C0004623
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Bacterial Infections and Mycoses

Infections caused by bacteria and fungi, general, specified, or unspecified. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
2161
Concept ID:
C0004615
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Amino acid

One of several molecules that join together to form proteins. There are 20 common amino acids found in proteins. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
250
Concept ID:
C0002520
Pharmacologic Substance

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