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Results: 13

1.

Disease Response

The pathologic and/or clinical changes that result from treatment. The changes may include eradication of detectable disease, stabilization of disease, or disease progression. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
309976
Concept ID:
C1704632
Finding
2.

Drug abuse

Drug abuse is a serious public health problem that affects almost every community and family in some way. Each year drug abuse causes millions of serious illnesses or injuries among Americans. Abused drugs include: -Amphetamines. -Anabolic steroids. -Club drugs. -Cocaine. -Heroin. -Inhalants. -Marijuana. -Prescription drugs. Drug abuse also plays a role in many major social problems, such as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug abuse in the first place. . NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
41659
Concept ID:
C0013146
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
3.

Dopamine

A monoamine compound with positive inotropic activity. Dopamine is a naturally occurring catecholamine formed by decarboxylation of dehydroxyphenylalanine and a precursor of norepinephrine and epinephrine. Dopamine binds to alpha-1 and beta-1 adrenergic receptors. Mediated through myocardial beta-1 adrenergic receptors, dopamine increase heart rate and force, thereby increasing cardiac output. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor stimulation on vascular smooth muscle, leads to vasoconstriction and results in an increase in systemic vascular resistance. Stimulation of dopaminergic receptors in renal vasculature, leads to renal blood vessel dilation, and an increase in glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, sodium excretion, and urine output. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
41644
Concept ID:
C0013030
Pharmacologic Substance
4.

Inosine

A purine nucleoside that has hypoxanthine linked by the N9 nitrogen to the C1 carbon of ribose. It is an intermediate in the degradation of purines and purine nucleosides to uric acid and in pathways of purine salvage. It also occurs in the anticodon of certain transfer RNA molecules. (Dorland, 28th ed) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
9477
Concept ID:
C0021528
Pharmacologic Substance
5.

Adenosine

A nucleoside that is composed of ADENINE and D-RIBOSE. Adenosine or adenosine derivatives play many important biological roles in addition to being components of DNA and RNA. Adenosine itself is a neurotransmitter. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
127
Concept ID:
C0001443
Pharmacologic Substance
6.

Victim of abuse finding

Indication of abuse victim.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
646740
Concept ID:
C0562381
Finding
7.

Related

MedGen UID:
619805
Concept ID:
C0445223
Finding
8.

Detected

MedGen UID:
617726
Concept ID:
C0442726
Finding
9.

Larsen syndrome, dominant type

The FLNB-related disorders include a spectrum of phenotypes ranging from mild (spondylocarpotarsal synostosis [SCT] syndrome and Larsen syndrome) to severe (atelosteogenesis types I [AOI] and III [AOIII], boomerang dysplasia). SCT syndrome is characterized by disproportionate short stature, block vertebrae, scoliosis and lordosis, carpal and tarsal fusion, club feet, hearing loss, dental enamel hypoplasia, and mild facial dysmorphisms. Larsen syndrome is characterized by congenital dislocations of the hip, knee, and elbow; club feet (equinovarus or equinovalgus foot deformities); scoliosis and cervical kyphosis, which can be associated with a cervical myelopathy; short, broad, spatulate distal phalanges; and distinctive craniofacies (prominent forehead, depressed nasal bridge, malar flattening, andwidely spaced eyes). Both can have midline cleft palate and conductive hearing loss. AOIII and AOI are characterized by severe short-limbed dwarfism; dislocated hips, knees, and elbows; and club feet. AOI is lethal in the perinatal period. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
320634
Concept ID:
C1835564
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy

Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is a progressive disorder of ataxia, choreoathetosis, and dementia or character changes in adults and ataxia, myoclonus, epilepsy, and progressive intellectual deterioration in children. The age of onset is from one to 62 years with a mean age of onset of 30 years. The clinical presentation varies depending on the age of onset. The cardinal features in adults are ataxia, choreoathetosis, and dementia. Cardinal features in children are progressive intellectual deterioration, behavioral changes, myoclonus, and epilepsy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
155630
Concept ID:
C0751781
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Functional disorder

Deranged function in an individual or an organ that is due to a disease. (MedicineNet.com) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
124450
Concept ID:
C0277785
Pathologic Function
12.

Addiction

The observable, measurable, and often pathological activity of an organism that portrays its inability to overcome a habit resulting in an insatiable craving for a substance or for performing certain acts. The addictive behavior includes the emotional and physical overdependence on the object of habit in increasing amount or frequency. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
88373
Concept ID:
C0085281
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
13.

Examined for

Having been subjected to inspection or evaluation. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
83047
Concept ID:
C0332128
Finding

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