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Results: 6

1.

Male gender

A person who belongs to the sex that normally produces sperm. The term is used to indicate biological sex distinctions, cultural gender role distinctions, or both. (NCI) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7446
Concept ID:
C0024554
Finding
2.

Carcinoma

type of cancer [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
2867
Concept ID:
C0007097
Neoplastic Process
3.

Breast carcinoma

The presence of a carcinoma of the breast. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
428324
Concept ID:
CN002714
Finding
4.

Breast Carcinoma

Cancer that forms in tissues of the breast, usually the ducts (tubes that carry milk to the nipple) and lobules (glands that make milk). It occurs in both men and women, although male breast cancer is rare. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
146260
Concept ID:
C0678222
Neoplastic Process
5.

Familial cancer of breast

Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC), caused by a germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2, is characterized by an increased risk for breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, and pancreatic cancer. The lifetime risk for these cancers in individuals with a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2: 40%-80% for breast cancer. 11%-40% for ovarian cancer. 1%-10% for male breast cancer. Up to 39% for prostate cancer. 1%-7% for pancreatic cancer. Individuals with BRCA2 mutations may also be at an increased risk for melanoma. Prognosis for BRCA1/2-related cancer depends on the stage at which the cancer is diagnosed; however, studies on survival have revealed conflicting results for individuals with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations when compared to controls. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
87542
Concept ID:
C0346153
Neoplastic Process
6.

Carcinoma of male breast

Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between the ages of 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. Other breast symptoms can include: -Dimpled or puckered skin. -A red, scaly nipple or skin. -Fluid discharge. Risk factors for male breast cancer include exposure to radiation, a family history of breast cancer, and having high estrogen levels, which can happen with diseases like cirrhosis or Klinefelter's syndrome. Treatment for male breast cancer is usually a mastectomy, which is surgery to remove the breast. Other treatments include radiation, chemotherapy and/or hormone therapy. . NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
68650
Concept ID:
C0238033
Neoplastic Process

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