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Septo-optic dysplasia sequence(SOD)

MedGen UID:
90926
Concept ID:
C0338503
Congenital Abnormality
Synonyms: De morsier syndrome; HESX1-Related Combined Pituitary Hormone Deficiency; Hypopituitarism and septooptic 'dysplasia'; Septo-optic dysplasia; Septo-optic dysplasia with growth hormone deficiency; Septooptic Dysplasia; SOD
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Intellectual Product
Sources: HPO, OMIM, Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in homozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, autosomal recessive disorders manifest in homozygotes (with two copies of the mutant allele) or compound heterozygotes (whereby each copy of a gene has a distinct mutant allele).
Autosomal dominant inheritance
MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Intellectual Product
Sources: HPO, OMIM, Orphanet
Autosomal dominant inheritance refers to genetic conditions that occur when a mutation is present in one copy of a given gene (i.e., the person is heterozygous).
Multifactorial inheritance
MedGen UID:
109109
Concept ID:
C0600599
Genetic Function
Sources: HPO, Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that depends on a mixture of major and minor genetic determinants possibly together with environmental factors. Diseases inherited in this manner are termed complex diseases.
not inherited
MedGen UID:
832438
Concept ID:
CN227390
Intellectual Product
Source: Orphanet
Describes a disorder that is not inherited.
Autosomal recessive inheritance (HPO, OMIM, Orphanet)
Autosomal dominant inheritance (HPO, OMIM, Orphanet)
not inherited (Orphanet)
SNOMED CT: Septo-optic dysplasia sequence (7611002); Septo optic dysplasia (7611002)
 
Gene (location): HESX1 (3p14.3)
OMIM®: 182230
HPO: HP:0100842
Orphanet: ORPHA3157

Definition

Septooptic dysplasia is a clinically heterogeneous disorder loosely defined by any combination of optic nerve hypoplasia, pituitary gland hypoplasia, and midline abnormalities of the brain, including absence of the corpus callosum and septum pellucidum (Dattani et al., 1998). The diagnosis of this rare congenital anomaly is made when 2 or more features of the classic triad are present. Approximately 30% of patients have complete manifestations, 62% display hypopituitarism, and 60% have an absent septum pellucidum. The disorder is equally prevalent in males and females and is more common in infants born to younger mothers, with a reported incidence of 1 in 10,000 live births (summary by Webb and Dattani, 2010). Also see 516020.0012 for a form of septooptic dysplasia associated with cardiomyopathy and exercise intolerance. [from OMIM]

Additional description

From GHR
Septo-optic dysplasia is a disorder of early brain development. Although its signs and symptoms vary, this condition is traditionally defined by three characteristic features: underdevelopment (hypoplasia) of the optic nerves, abnormal formation of structures along the midline of the brain, and pituitary hypoplasia.The first major feature, optic nerve hypoplasia, is the underdevelopment of the optic nerves, which carry visual information from the eyes to the brain. In affected individuals, the optic nerves are abnormally small and make fewer connections than usual between the eyes and the brain. As a result, people with optic nerve hypoplasia have impaired vision in one or both eyes. Optic nerve hypoplasia can also be associated with unusual side-to-side eye movements (nystagmus) and other eye abnormalities.The second characteristic feature of septo-optic dysplasia is the abnormal development of structures separating the right and left halves of the brain. These structures include the corpus callosum, which is a band of tissue that connects the two halves of the brain, and the septum pellucidum, which separates the fluid-filled spaces called ventricles in the brain. In the early stages of brain development, these structures may form abnormally or fail to develop at all. Depending on which structures are affected, abnormal brain development can lead to intellectual disability and other neurological problems.The third major feature of this disorder is pituitary hypoplasia. The pituitary is a gland at the base of the brain that produces several hormones. These hormones help control growth, reproduction, and other critical body functions. Underdevelopment of the pituitary can lead to a shortage (deficiency) of many essential hormones. Most commonly, pituitary hypoplasia causes growth hormone deficiency, which results in slow growth and unusually short stature. Severe cases cause panhypopituitarism, a condition in which the pituitary produces no hormones. Panhypopituitarism is associated with slow growth, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), genital abnormalities, and problems with sexual development.The signs and symptoms of septo-optic dysplasia can vary significantly. Some researchers suggest that septo-optic dysplasia should actually be considered a group of related conditions rather than a single disorder. About one-third of people diagnosed with septo-optic dysplasia have all three major features; most affected individuals have two of the major features. In rare cases, septo-optic dysplasia is associated with additional signs and symptoms, including recurrent seizures (epilepsy), delayed development, and abnormal movements.  https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/septo-optic-dysplasia

Clinical features

BLOOD GROUP--DIEGO SYSTEM
MedGen UID:
8349
Concept ID:
C0011848
Disease or Syndrome
Diabetes insipidus (DI) causes frequent urination. You become extremely thirsty, so you drink. Then you urinate. This cycle can keep you from sleeping or even make you wet the bed. Your body produces lots of urine that is almost all water. DI is different from diabetes mellitus (DM), which involves insulin problems and high blood sugar. The symptoms can be similar. However, DI is related to how your kidneys handle fluids. It's much less common than DM. Urine and blood tests can show which one you have. Usually, DI is caused by a problem with your pituitary gland or your kidneys. Treatment depends on the cause of the problem. Medicines can often help. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
Diabetes mellitus, gestational
MedGen UID:
38815
Concept ID:
C0085207
Finding
Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. When you are pregnant, high blood sugar levels are not good for your baby. About seven out of every 100 pregnant women in the United States get gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that happens for the first time when a woman is pregnant. Most of the time, it goes away after you have your baby. But it does increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes later on. Your child is also at risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Most women get a test to check for diabetes during their second trimester of pregnancy. Women at higher risk may get a test earlier. If you already have diabetes, the best time to control your blood sugar is before you get pregnant. High blood sugar levels can be harmful to your baby during the first weeks of pregnancy - even before you know you are pregnant. To keep you and your baby healthy, it is important to keep your blood sugar as close to normal as possible before and during pregnancy. Either type of diabetes during pregnancy increases the chances of problems for you and your baby. To help lower the chances talk to your health care team about. -A meal plan for your pregnancy. -A safe exercise plan. -How often to test your blood sugar. -Taking your medicine as prescribed. Your medicine plan may need to change during pregnancy. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
Pituitary hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
215300
Concept ID:
C0948740
Disease or Syndrome
Underdevelopment of the anterior pituitary gland.
Growth hormone deficiency
MedGen UID:
811475
Concept ID:
C3714796
Disease or Syndrome
Insufficient production of growth hormone, which is produced by the anterior pituitary gland. Growth hormone is a major participant in control of growth and metabolism.
Anterior hypopituitarism
MedGen UID:
871333
Concept ID:
C4025821
Disease or Syndrome
A condition of reduced function of the pituitary gland characterized by decreased secretion of one or more of the pituitary hormones growth hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, prolactin, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone.
Nystagmus
MedGen UID:
45166
Concept ID:
C0028738
Disease or Syndrome
Rhythmic, involuntary oscillations of one or both eyes related to abnormality in fixation, conjugate gaze, or vestibular mechanisms.
Optic atrophy
MedGen UID:
18180
Concept ID:
C0029124
Disease or Syndrome
Atrophy of the optic nerve. Optic atrophy results from the death of the retinal ganglion cell axons that comprise the optic nerve and manifesting as a pale optic nerve on fundoscopy.
Strabismus
MedGen UID:
21337
Concept ID:
C0038379
Disease or Syndrome
Strabismus (also known as squint) is a condition in which the eyes are not properly aligned with each other.
Visual impairment
MedGen UID:
22663
Concept ID:
C0042798
Finding
Vision considered to be inferior to normal vision as represented by accepted standards of acuity, field of vision, or motility. Low vision generally refers to visual disorders that are caused by diseases that cannot be corrected by refraction (e.g., MACULAR DEGENERATION; RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA; DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, etc.).
Optic nerve hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
137901
Concept ID:
C0338502
Congenital Abnormality
Underdevelopment of the optic nerve.
Septo-optic dysplasia sequence
MedGen UID:
90926
Concept ID:
C0338503
Congenital Abnormality
Septooptic dysplasia is a clinically heterogeneous disorder loosely defined by any combination of optic nerve hypoplasia, pituitary gland hypoplasia, and midline abnormalities of the brain, including absence of the corpus callosum and septum pellucidum (Dattani et al., 1998). The diagnosis of this rare congenital anomaly is made when 2 or more features of the classic triad are present. Approximately 30% of patients have complete manifestations, 62% display hypopituitarism, and 60% have an absent septum pellucidum. The disorder is equally prevalent in males and females and is more common in infants born to younger mothers, with a reported incidence of 1 in 10,000 live births (summary by Webb and Dattani, 2010). Also see 516020.0012 for a form of septooptic dysplasia associated with cardiomyopathy and exercise intolerance.
Hypoplasia of optic disc
MedGen UID:
224879
Concept ID:
C1298695
Finding
Underdevelopment of the optic disc, that is of the optic nerve head, where ganglion cell axons exit the eye to form the optic nerve.
Cryptorchidism, unilateral or bilateral
MedGen UID:
8192
Concept ID:
C0010417
Congenital Abnormality
Cryptorchidism, or failure of testicular descent, is a common human congenital abnormality with a multifactorial etiology that likely reflects the involvement of endocrine, environmental, and hereditary factors. Cryptorchidism can result in infertility and increases risk for testicular tumors. Testicular descent from abdomen to scrotum occurs in 2 distinct phases: the transabdominal phase and the inguinoscrotal phase (summary by Gorlov et al., 2002).
Kidney dysfunction
MedGen UID:
508816
Concept ID:
C0151746
Pathologic Function
An abnormal functionality of the kidney.
Micropenis
MedGen UID:
78603
Concept ID:
C0266435
Congenital Abnormality
Abnormally small penis. At birth, the normal penis is about 3 cm (stretched length from pubic tubercle to tip of penis) with micropenis less than 2.0-2.5 cm.
Polydactyly
MedGen UID:
57774
Concept ID:
C0152427
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital anomaly characterized by the presence of supernumerary fingers or toes.
Short finger
MedGen UID:
334977
Concept ID:
C1844548
Anatomical Abnormality
Abnormally short finger associated with developmental hypoplasia.
Obesity
MedGen UID:
18127
Concept ID:
C0028754
Disease or Syndrome
Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. The weight may come from muscle, bone, fat, and/or body water. Both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what's considered healthy for his or her height. . Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories than you use. The balance between calories-in and calories-out differs for each person. Factors that might affect your weight include your genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods, and not being physically active. . Being obese increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and some cancers. If you are obese, losing even 5 to 10 percent of your weight can delay or prevent some of these diseases. For example, that means losing 10 to 20 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
Short stature
MedGen UID:
87607
Concept ID:
C0349588
Finding
Height greater than two standard deviations below the mean of the appropriate reference population for the age and sex of the individual.
Sensorineural hearing loss
MedGen UID:
9164
Concept ID:
C0018784
Disease or Syndrome
Hearing loss resulting from damage to the COCHLEA and the sensorineural elements which lie internally beyond the oval and round windows. These elements include the AUDITORY NERVE and its connections in the BRAINSTEM.
Autistic disorder of childhood onset
MedGen UID:
13966
Concept ID:
C0004352
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Autism, the prototypic pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), is usually apparent by 3 years of age. It is characterized by a triad of limited or absent verbal communication, a lack of reciprocal social interaction or responsiveness, and restricted, stereotypic, and ritualized patterns of interests and behavior (Bailey et al., 1996; Risch et al., 1999). 'Autism spectrum disorder,' sometimes referred to as ASD, is a broader phenotype encompassing the less severe disorders Asperger syndrome (see ASPG1; 608638) and pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). 'Broad autism phenotype' includes individuals with some symptoms of autism, but who do not meet the full criteria for autism or other disorders. Mental retardation coexists in approximately two-thirds of individuals with ASD, except for Asperger syndrome, in which mental retardation is conspicuously absent (Jones et al., 2008). Genetic studies in autism often include family members with these less stringent diagnoses (Schellenberg et al., 2006). Levy et al. (2009) provided a general review of autism and autism spectrum disorder, including epidemiology, characteristics of the disorder, diagnosis, neurobiologic hypotheses for the etiology, genetics, and treatment options. Genetic Heterogeneity of Autism Autism is considered to be a complex multifactorial disorder involving many genes. Accordingly, several loci have been identified, some or all of which may contribute to the phenotype. Included in this entry is AUTS1, which has been mapped to chromosome 7q22. Other susceptibility loci include AUTS3 (608049), which maps to chromosome 13q14; AUTS4 (608636), which maps to chromosome 15q11; AUTS5 (606053), which maps to chromosome 2q; AUTS6 (609378), which maps to chromosome 17q11; AUTS7 (610676), which maps to chromosome 17q21; AUTS8 (607373), which maps to chromosome 3q25-q27; AUTS9 (611015), which maps to chromosome 7q31; AUTS10 (611016), which maps to chromosome 7q36; AUTS11 (610836), which maps to chromosome 1q41; AUTS12 (610838), which maps to chromosome 21p13-q11; AUTS13 (610908), which maps to chromosome 12q14; AUTS14A (611913), which has been found in patients with a deletion of a region of 16p11.2; AUTS14B (614671), which has been found in patients with a duplication of a region of 16p11.2; AUTS15 (612100), associated with mutation in the CNTNAP2 gene (604569) on chromosome 7q35-q36; AUTS16 (613410), associated with mutation in the SLC9A9 gene (608396) on chromosome 3q24; AUTS17 (613436), associated with mutation in the SHANK2 gene (603290) on chromosome 11q13; and AUTS18 (615032), associated with mutation in the CHD8 gene (610528). (NOTE: the symbol 'AUTS2' has been used to refer to a gene on chromosome 7q11 (KIAA0442; 607270) and therefore is not used as a part of this autism locus series.) There are several X-linked forms of autism susceptibility: AUTSX1 (300425), associated with mutations in the NLGN3 gene (300336); AUTSX2 (300495), associated with mutations in NLGN4 (300427); AUTSX3 (300496), associated with mutations in MECP2 (300005); AUTSX4 (300830), associated with variation in the region on chromosome Xp22.11 containing the PTCHD1 gene (300828); AUTSX5 (300847), associated with mutations in the RPL10 gene (312173); and AUTSX6 (300872), associated with mutation in the TMLHE gene (300777). Folstein and Rosen-Sheidley (2001) reviewed the genetics of autism.
Seizure Disorders
MedGen UID:
4506
Concept ID:
C0014544
Disease or Syndrome
Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have recurring seizures. The seizures happen when clusters of nerve cells, or neurons, in the brain send out the wrong signals. People may have strange sensations and emotions or behave strangely. They may have violent muscle spasms or lose consciousness. Epilepsy has many possible causes, including illness, brain injury, and abnormal brain development. In many cases, the cause is unknown. Doctors use brain scans and other tests to diagnose epilepsy. It is important to start treatment right away. There is no cure for epilepsy, but medicines can control seizures for most people. When medicines are not working well, surgery or implanted devices such as vagus nerve stimulators may help. Special diets can help some children with epilepsy. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.
Sleep disturbance
MedGen UID:
52372
Concept ID:
C0037317
Sign or Symptom
An abnormality of sleep including such phenomena as 1) insomnia/hypersomnia, 2) non-restorative sleep, 3) sleep schedule disorder, 4) excessive daytime somnolence, 5) sleep apnea, and 6) restlessness.
Corpus callosum agenesis
MedGen UID:
104498
Concept ID:
C0175754
Congenital Abnormality
The corpus callosum is the largest fiber tract in the central nervous system and the major interhemispheric fiber bundle in the brain. Formation of the corpus callosum begins as early as 6 weeks' gestation, with the first fibers crossing the midline at 11 to 12 weeks' gestation, and completion of the basic shape by age 18 to 20 weeks (Schell-Apacik et al., 2008). Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) is one of the most frequent malformations in brain with a reported incidence ranging between 0.5 and 70 in 10,000 births. ACC is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition, which can be observed either as an isolated condition or as a manifestation in the context of a congenital syndrome (see MOLECULAR GENETICS and Dobyns, 1996). Schell-Apacik et al. (2008) noted that there is confusion in the literature regarding radiologic terminology concerning partial absence of the corpus callosum, where various designations have been used, including hypogenesis, hypoplasia, partial agenesis, or dysgenesis.
Optic nerve hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
137901
Concept ID:
C0338502
Congenital Abnormality
Underdevelopment of the optic nerve.
Septo-optic dysplasia sequence
MedGen UID:
90926
Concept ID:
C0338503
Congenital Abnormality
Septooptic dysplasia is a clinically heterogeneous disorder loosely defined by any combination of optic nerve hypoplasia, pituitary gland hypoplasia, and midline abnormalities of the brain, including absence of the corpus callosum and septum pellucidum (Dattani et al., 1998). The diagnosis of this rare congenital anomaly is made when 2 or more features of the classic triad are present. Approximately 30% of patients have complete manifestations, 62% display hypopituitarism, and 60% have an absent septum pellucidum. The disorder is equally prevalent in males and females and is more common in infants born to younger mothers, with a reported incidence of 1 in 10,000 live births (summary by Webb and Dattani, 2010). Also see 516020.0012 for a form of septooptic dysplasia associated with cardiomyopathy and exercise intolerance.
Cognitive impairment
MedGen UID:
90932
Concept ID:
C0338656
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
a condition where a person has problems with the ability to think and learn
Hemiplegia/hemiparesis
MedGen UID:
852561
Concept ID:
C0375206
Finding
Loss of strength in the arm, leg, and sometimes face on one side of the body. Hemiplegia refers to a severe or complete loss of strength, whereas hemiparesis refers to a relatively mild loss of strength.
Absent septum pellucidum
MedGen UID:
96561
Concept ID:
C0431371
Congenital Abnormality
Absence of the septum pellucidum.
Global developmental delay
MedGen UID:
107838
Concept ID:
C0557874
Finding
A delay in the achievement of motor or mental milestones in the domains of development of a child, including motor skills, speech and language, cognitive skills, and social and emotional skills. This term should only be used to describe children younger than five years of age.
Pituitary hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
215300
Concept ID:
C0948740
Disease or Syndrome
Underdevelopment of the anterior pituitary gland.
Hypoplasia or absence of the corpus callosum
MedGen UID:
354608
Concept ID:
C1861866
Finding
Absence or underdevelopment of the corpus callosum.
Cerebellar hypoplasia and atrophy
MedGen UID:
480852
Concept ID:
C3279222
Finding
Growth hormone deficiency
MedGen UID:
811475
Concept ID:
C3714796
Disease or Syndrome
Insufficient production of growth hormone, which is produced by the anterior pituitary gland. Growth hormone is a major participant in control of growth and metabolism.
Abnormality of the sense of smell
MedGen UID:
867293
Concept ID:
C4021655
Anatomical Abnormality
An anomaly in the ability to perceive and distinguish scents (odors).
Anterior hypopituitarism
MedGen UID:
871333
Concept ID:
C4025821
Disease or Syndrome
A condition of reduced function of the pituitary gland characterized by decreased secretion of one or more of the pituitary hormones growth hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, prolactin, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone.
Tracheoesophageal fistula
MedGen UID:
21228
Concept ID:
C0040588
Anatomical Abnormality
Abnormal passage between the ESOPHAGUS and the TRACHEA, acquired or congenital, often associated with ESOPHAGEAL ATRESIA.
Constipation
MedGen UID:
1101
Concept ID:
C0009806
Sign or Symptom
Constipation means that a person has three or fewer bowel movements in a week. The stool can be hard and dry. Sometimes it is painful to pass. At one time or another, almost everyone gets constipated. In most cases, it lasts a short time and is not serious. . There are many things you can do to prevent constipation. They include - Eating more fruits, vegetables and grains, which are high in fiber. - Drinking plenty of water and other liquids. - Getting enough exercise. - Taking time to have a bowel movement when you need to. - Using laxatives only if your doctor says you should. - Asking your doctor if medicines you take may cause constipation. . It's not important that you have a bowel movement every day. If your bowel habits change, however, check with your doctor. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
Tracheoesophageal fistula
MedGen UID:
21228
Concept ID:
C0040588
Anatomical Abnormality
Abnormal passage between the ESOPHAGUS and the TRACHEA, acquired or congenital, often associated with ESOPHAGEAL ATRESIA.
Diabetes mellitus, gestational
MedGen UID:
38815
Concept ID:
C0085207
Finding
Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. When you are pregnant, high blood sugar levels are not good for your baby. About seven out of every 100 pregnant women in the United States get gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that happens for the first time when a woman is pregnant. Most of the time, it goes away after you have your baby. But it does increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes later on. Your child is also at risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Most women get a test to check for diabetes during their second trimester of pregnancy. Women at higher risk may get a test earlier. If you already have diabetes, the best time to control your blood sugar is before you get pregnant. High blood sugar levels can be harmful to your baby during the first weeks of pregnancy - even before you know you are pregnant. To keep you and your baby healthy, it is important to keep your blood sugar as close to normal as possible before and during pregnancy. Either type of diabetes during pregnancy increases the chances of problems for you and your baby. To help lower the chances talk to your health care team about. -A meal plan for your pregnancy. -A safe exercise plan. -How often to test your blood sugar. -Taking your medicine as prescribed. Your medicine plan may need to change during pregnancy. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
Polydactyly
MedGen UID:
57774
Concept ID:
C0152427
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital anomaly characterized by the presence of supernumerary fingers or toes.
Short finger
MedGen UID:
334977
Concept ID:
C1844548
Anatomical Abnormality
Abnormally short finger associated with developmental hypoplasia.
Cleft palate
MedGen UID:
3107
Concept ID:
C0008925
Congenital Abnormality
Cleft palate is a developmental defect of the palate resulting from a failure of fusion of the palatine processes and manifesting as a separation of the roof of the mouth (soft and hard palate).
Abnormality of the sense of smell
MedGen UID:
867293
Concept ID:
C4021655
Anatomical Abnormality
An anomaly in the ability to perceive and distinguish scents (odors).
Hyphidrosis
MedGen UID:
43796
Concept ID:
C0020620
Disease or Syndrome
Abnormally diminished capacity to sweat.
Dry skin
MedGen UID:
56250
Concept ID:
C0151908
Sign or Symptom
Skin characterized by the lack of natural or normal moisture.
Diabetes mellitus, gestational
MedGen UID:
38815
Concept ID:
C0085207
Finding
Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. When you are pregnant, high blood sugar levels are not good for your baby. About seven out of every 100 pregnant women in the United States get gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that happens for the first time when a woman is pregnant. Most of the time, it goes away after you have your baby. But it does increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes later on. Your child is also at risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Most women get a test to check for diabetes during their second trimester of pregnancy. Women at higher risk may get a test earlier. If you already have diabetes, the best time to control your blood sugar is before you get pregnant. High blood sugar levels can be harmful to your baby during the first weeks of pregnancy - even before you know you are pregnant. To keep you and your baby healthy, it is important to keep your blood sugar as close to normal as possible before and during pregnancy. Either type of diabetes during pregnancy increases the chances of problems for you and your baby. To help lower the chances talk to your health care team about. -A meal plan for your pregnancy. -A safe exercise plan. -How often to test your blood sugar. -Taking your medicine as prescribed. Your medicine plan may need to change during pregnancy. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVSepto-optic dysplasia sequence
Follow this link to review classifications for Septo-optic dysplasia sequence in Orphanet.

Conditions with this feature

Septo-optic dysplasia sequence
MedGen UID:
90926
Concept ID:
C0338503
Congenital Abnormality
Septooptic dysplasia is a clinically heterogeneous disorder loosely defined by any combination of optic nerve hypoplasia, pituitary gland hypoplasia, and midline abnormalities of the brain, including absence of the corpus callosum and septum pellucidum (Dattani et al., 1998). The diagnosis of this rare congenital anomaly is made when 2 or more features of the classic triad are present. Approximately 30% of patients have complete manifestations, 62% display hypopituitarism, and 60% have an absent septum pellucidum. The disorder is equally prevalent in males and females and is more common in infants born to younger mothers, with a reported incidence of 1 in 10,000 live births (summary by Webb and Dattani, 2010). Also see 516020.0012 for a form of septooptic dysplasia associated with cardiomyopathy and exercise intolerance.
Craniotelencephalic dysplasia
MedGen UID:
347462
Concept ID:
C1857471
Disease or Syndrome
Tetraamelia, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
411798
Concept ID:
C2749279
Disease or Syndrome
Tetra-amelia syndrome is characterized by the (complete) absence of all four limbs and anomalies involving the cranium and the face (cleft lip/cleft palate, micrognathia, microtia, single naris, choanal atresia, absence of nose); eyes (microphthalmia, microcornea, cataract, coloboma, palpebral fusion); urogenital system (renal agenesis, persistence of cloaca, absence of external genitalia, atresia of vagina); anus (atresia); heart; lungs (hypoplasia/aplasia), skeleton (hypoplasia/absence of pelvic bones, absence of ribs, absence of vertebrae), and central nervous system (agenesis of olfactory nerves, agenesis of optic nerves, agenesis of corpus callosum, hydrocephalus). Affected infants are often stillborn or die shortly after birth.

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