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Results: 4

1.

Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility

Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation associated with uncontrolled skeletal muscle hypermetabolism. Manifestations of malignant hyperthermia (MH) are precipitated by certain volatile anesthetics (i.e., halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, enflurane), either alone or in conjunction with a depolarizing muscle relaxant (specifically, succinylcholine). The triggering substances release calcium stores from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and may promote entry of calcium from the myoplasm, causing contracture of skeletal muscles, glycogenolysis, and increased cellular metabolism, resulting in production of heat and excess lactate. Affected individuals experience: acidosis, hypercapnia, tachycardia, hyperthermia, muscle rigidity, compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis with subsequent increase in serum creatine kinase (CK) concentration, hyperkalemia with a risk for cardiac arrhythmia or even arrest, and myoglobinuria with a risk for renal failure. In nearly all cases, the first manifestations of MH (tachycardia and tachypnea) occur in the operating room; however, MH may also occur in the early postoperative period. There is mounting evidence that some affected individuals will also develop MH with exercise and/or on exposure to hot environments. Without proper and prompt treatment with dantrolene sodium, mortality is extremely high. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
9867
Concept ID:
C0024591
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Malignant hyperthermia

Malignant hyperthermia is characterized by a rapid increase in temperature to 39-42 degrees C in response to inhalational anesthetics such as halothane or to muscle relaxants such as succinylcholine. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505071
Concept ID:
CN001851
Finding
3.

Hyperthermia

Abnormal high body temperature. [from HHCC]

MedGen UID:
312405
Concept ID:
C1704628
Finding
4.

Fever

A fever is a body temperature that is higher than normal. It is not an illness. It is part of your body's defense against infection. Most bacteria and viruses that cause infections do well at the body's normal temperature (98.6 F). A slight fever can make it harder for them to survive. Fever also activates your body's immune system. Infections cause most fevers. There can be many other causes, including: - Medicines. - Heat exhaustion. - Cancers. - Autoimmune diseases. Treatment depends on the cause of your fever. Your health care provider may recommend using over-the-counter medicines such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen to lower a very high fever. Adults can also take aspirin, but children with fevers should not take aspirin. It is also important to drink enough liquids to prevent dehydration.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5169
Concept ID:
C0015967
Finding

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