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Results: 11

1.

Tyrosine

Amino acid with side chain -CH2-C6H4OH. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
21746
Concept ID:
C0041485
Pharmacologic Substance
2.

Phosphorylation

A process in which a phosphate group is added to a molecule, such as a sugar or a protein. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10742
Concept ID:
C0031715
Molecular Function
3.

stas-Hustenlser

MedGen UID:
258489
Concept ID:
C1449521
Pharmacologic Substance
4.

Does not

MedGen UID:
721427
Concept ID:
C1299585
Finding
5.

Unable

MedGen UID:
721425
Concept ID:
C1299582
Finding
6.

Phospholipid Binding

Phospholipid Interaction involves the molecular interaction between a phospholipid molecule and a macromolecule (usually protein) for transport, catalysis, localization, or modification of function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
218858
Concept ID:
C1148642
Molecular Function
7.

MedGen UID:
109303
Concept ID:
C0596988
8.

Mutagenesis Process

Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
86969
Concept ID:
C0079866
Molecular Function
9.

Protein binding

The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
18704
Concept ID:
C0033618
Molecular Function
10.

Amino acid

One of several molecules that join together to form proteins. There are 20 common amino acids found in proteins. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
250
Concept ID:
C0002520
Pharmacologic Substance
11.

Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism Pathway

Cholesterol is essential for life but a key in the development of heart disease. Cholesterol homeostasis is achieved through regulation of cholesterol uptake, cholesterol biosynthesis, cholesterol conversion to bile acids and excretion of bile acids. Inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis up regulates LDLR expression and is the mechanism of action of many drugs used to lower plasma LDL to reduce coronary heart disease. Many aspects of cholesterol homeostasis are regulated by the nuclear receptors FXR and LXR, both nuclear receptor transcription factors that form heterodimers with the retinoic acid RXR receptors and that are activated by cholesterol metabolites. One of the primary tissues in cholesterol metabolism is the liver, a key site of cholesterol biosynthesis and where cholesterol low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is taken up from the plasma by the LDL-receptor. When cholesterol accumulates in liver cells, some of the cholesterol is oxidized to create oxysterols. Oxysterols activate LXR through LXR/RXR heterodimers to activate genes such as the CYP7A1 enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in bile acid biosynthesis and a major route for the elimination of cholesterol. Animals lacking the CYP7A1 enzyme accumulate cholesterol in the liver. In the intestine LXR activates the ABC-1 gene, a transporter that actively transports cholesterol out of cells to clear it from the body. Activation of ABC-1 expression by LXR in macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques appears to be another mechanism by which LXR plays a role in heart disease. The FXR receptor is activated by bile acids. In the liver, activation of FXR-RXR heterodimers by bile acids results in the feedback inhibition of CYP7A expression and reduced biosynthesis of bile acids. In the intestine, FXR activates expression of I-BABP, a protein that increases the transport of bile acids back to the liver from the intestine, reducing their excretion. Drugs targeting the FXR and LXR receptors could play an important role in modulating cholesterol homeostasis and heart disease in the future. (BioCarta) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
271474
Concept ID:
C1514824
Molecular Function

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