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Items: 14

1.

Carcinoma of cervix

The cervix is the lower part of the uterus, the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by several types of a virus called human papillomaviruses (HPV). The virus spreads through sexual contact. Most women's bodies are able to fight HPV infection. But sometimes the virus leads to cancer. You're at higher risk if you smoke, have many children, use birth control pills for a long time, or have HIV infection. . Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first, but later, you may have pelvic pain or bleeding from the vagina. It usually takes several years for normal cells in the cervix to turn into cancer cells. Your health care provider can find abnormal cells by doing a Pap test - examining cells from the cervix under a microscope. By getting regular Pap tests and pelvic exams you can find and treat changing cells before they turn into cancer. A vaccine for girls and young women protects against the four types of HPV that cause most cervical cancers. . NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
86222
Concept ID:
C0302592
Neoplastic Process
2.

Anxiety

Fear and anxiety are part of life. You may feel anxious before you take a test or walk down a dark street. This kind of anxiety is useful - it can make you more alert or careful. It usually ends soon after you are out of the situation that caused it. But for millions of people in the United States, the anxiety does not go away, and gets worse over time. They may have chest pains or nightmares. They may even be afraid to leave home. These people have anxiety disorders. Types include. -Panic disorder . -Obsessive-compulsive disorder . -Post-traumatic stress disorder . -Phobias . -Generalized anxiety disorder . Treatment can involve medicines, therapy or both. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1613
Concept ID:
C0003467
Finding; Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
3.

Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis acquired

Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a pathologic entity characterized by intraalveolar surfactant accumulation. There are 3 clinically distinct forms: hereditary (usually congenital), secondary, and acquired. The acquired form of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is the most common form, accounting for approximately 90% of cases. The mean age at diagnosis is 39 years and it is associated with smoking in 72% of cases. The estimated incidence and prevalence are 0.36 and 3.70 cases per million, respectively (Trapnell et al., 2003; Seymour and Presneill, 2002). Secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis develops in association with conditions involving functional impairment or reduced numbers of alveolar macrophages. Such conditions include some hematologic cancers, pharmacologic immunosuppression, inhalation of inorganic dust or toxic fumes, and certain infections. Congenital pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare, severe, often fatal disorder of newborns associated with pulmonary surfactant metabolism dysfunction caused by mutations in genes involved in surfactant metabolism (see, e.g., SMDP1, 265120) (Trapnell et al., 2003). See 300770 for information on congenital PAP due to CSF2RA (306250) deficiency. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
410079
Concept ID:
C1970472
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Anxiety

MedGen UID:
409544
Concept ID:
C1963064
Finding
5.

Pituitary adenoma predisposition

MedGen UID:
354959
Concept ID:
C1863340
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Anxiety

Human personality is shaped by genetic and environmental factors, and evidence suggests that the genetic component is highly complex, polygenic, and epistatic. Genetic factors are thought to contribute to 40 to 60% of trait variance. Molecular genetics has tried to identify specific genes for quantitative traits, called quantitative trait loci (QTLs). The QTL concept suggests that complex personality traits or dimensions are not attributable to single genes, but to multiple interacting genes (Reif and Lesch, 2003). Fullerton et al. (2003) stated that psychologists were in agreement that the wide variation in human personalities can be explained by a small number of personality factors, including neuroticism (a measure of emotional stability), which manifests at one extreme as anxiety, depression, moodiness, low self-esteem, and diffidence. They cited a number of studies that had described a relationship between high scores on measures of neuroticism and major depressive disorder. They also noted that theoretical studies had suggested that large samples of randomly ascertained sibs could be used to ascertain phenotypically extreme individuals and thereby increase power to detect genetic linkage in complex traits. See also panic disorder (PAND1; 167870), which is a subtype of anxiety disorder. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
335849
Concept ID:
C1842981
Disease or Syndrome; Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
7.

Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

Abnormal accumulation of surfactant-like, periodic acid-schiff-positive lipoproteinaceous material in macrophages within the alveolar spaces and distal bronchioles. This results in gas exchange impairment leading to dyspnea and alveolar infiltrates. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
18760
Concept ID:
C0034050
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Neoplasm of uterine cervix

Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
40201
Concept ID:
C0007873
Neoplastic Process
9.

Genitourinary neoplasm

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the genitourinary system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
22583
Concept ID:
C0042065
Neoplastic Process
10.

Neoplasm of uterus

Tumors or cancer of the UTERUS. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
12030
Concept ID:
C0042138
Neoplastic Process
11.

Cervical agenesis

MedGen UID:
807359
Concept ID:
C2921114
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Cervical agenesis

Congenital absence of the cervix. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
539897
Concept ID:
C0266404
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
13.

Hypoplasia of the uterus

Underdevelopment of the uterus. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
500879
Concept ID:
CN000014
Finding
14.

Aplasia of the uterus

Aplasia of the uterus. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
98421
Concept ID:
C0425913
Finding
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