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Items: 18

1.

Malignant melanoma

Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. Often the first sign of melanoma is a change in the size, shape, color, or feel of a mole. Most melanomas have a black or black-blue area. Melanoma may also appear as a new mole. It may be black, abnormal, or ugly looking.. Thinking of ABCDE can help you remember what to watch for:. - Asymmetry - the shape of one half does not match the other. - Border - the edges are ragged, blurred or irregular. - Color - the color is uneven and may include shades of black, brown and tan. - Diameter - there is a change in size, usually an increase. -Evolving - the mole has changed over the past few weeks or months. Surgery is the first treatment of all stages of melanoma. Other treatments include chemotherapy and radiation, biologic, and targeted therapies. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9944
Concept ID:
C0025202
Neoplastic Process
2.

Melanoma

The presence of a melanoma, a malignant cancer originating from pigment producing melanocytes. Melanoma can originate from the skin or the pigmented layers of the eye (the uvea). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505377
Concept ID:
CN002586
Finding
3.

Hereditary cutaneous melanoma

A melanoma defined by the presence of multiple cases of cutaneous melanoma among blood-relatives on the same side of the family. It is caused by germline mutations in the CDKN2A or CDK4 genes. It is associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in a subset of CDKN2A families (WHO, 2006). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
268851
Concept ID:
C1512419
Neoplastic Process
4.

Malignant melanoma of skin

A primary melanoma arising from atypical melanocytes in the skin. Precursor lesions include acquired and congenital melanocytic nevi, and dysplastic nevi. Several histologic variants have been recognized, including superficial spreading melanoma, acral lentiginous melanoma, nodular melanoma, and lentigo maligna melanoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
57486
Concept ID:
C0151779
Neoplastic Process
5.

Adenocarcinoma

A malignant neoplasm arising from glandular cells. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
122
Concept ID:
C0001418
Neoplastic Process
6.

Neoplasm of the pancreas

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the pancreas. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
425115
Concept ID:
CN002617
Finding
7.

Cutaneous malignant melanoma 1

Malignant melanoma is a neoplasm of pigment-producing cells called melanocytes that occurs most often in the skin, but may also occur in the eyes, ears, gastrointestinal tract, leptomeninges, and oral and genital mucous membranes (summary by Habif, 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Susceptibility to Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma The locus for susceptibility to familial cutaneous malignant melanoma-1 (CMM1) has been mapped to chromosome 1p36. Other CMM susceptibility loci include CMM2 (155601), caused by variation in the CDKN2A gene (600160) on chromosome 9p21; CMM3 (609048), caused by variation in the CDK4 gene (123829) on chromosome 12q14; CMM4 (608035), mapped to chromosome 1p22; CMM5 (613099), caused by variation in the MC1R gene (155555) on chromosome 16q24; CMM6 (613972), caused by variation in the XRCC3 gene (600675) on chromosome 14q32; CMM7 (612263), mapped to chromosome 20q11; CMM8 (614456), caused by variation in the MITF gene (156845) on chromosome 3p14-p12; CMM9 (615134), caused by variation in the TERT gene (187270) on chromosome 5p15; and CMM10 (615848), caused by mutation in the POT1 gene (606478) on chromosome 7q31. Somatic mutations causing malignant melanoma have also been identified in several genes, including BRAF (164757), STK11 (602216), PTEN (601728), TRRAP (603015), DCC (120470), GRIN2A (138253), ZNF831, BAP1 (603089), and RASA2 (601589). A large percentage of melanomas (40-60%) carry an activating somatic mutation in the BRAF gene, most often V600E (164757.0001) (Davies et al., 2002; Pollock et al., 2003). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
320506
Concept ID:
C1835047
Finding; Neoplastic Process
8.

Carcinoma of pancreas

Pancreatic cancer shows among the highest mortality rates of any cancer, with a 5-year relative survival rate of less than 5%. By the time of initial diagnosis, metastatic disease is commonly present. Established risk factors include a family history of pancreatic cancer, a medical history of diabetes type 2, and cigarette smoking (summary by Amundadottir et al., 2009). Genetic Heterogeneity of Pancreatic Cancer Somatic mutations in pancreatic cancer occur in the KRAS (190070), CDKN2A (600160), MADH4 (600993), TP53 (191170), ARMET (601916), STK11 (602216), ACVR1B (601300), and RBBP8 (604124) genes. Susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer include PNCA1 (606856), related to mutation in the PALLD gene on chromosome 4q32 (608092); PNCA2 (613347), related to mutation in the BRCA2 gene on chromosome 13q12 (600185); PNCA3 (613348), related to mutation in the PALB2 gene on chromosome 16p12 (610355); and PNCA4 (614320), related to mutation in the BRCA1 gene on chromosome 17q21 (113705). Occurrence of Pancreatic Cancer in Other Disorders Several familial cancer syndromes increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. The best characterized include hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer syndrome (HNPCC; see 120435); hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome due to mutations in BRCA2; Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (175200); the melanoma-pancreatic cancer syndrome (606719), caused by mutations in CDKN2A (600160); von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (193300), ataxia-telangiectasia (208900) (Swift et al., 1976), and juvenile polyposis syndrome (174900). Patients with hereditary pancreatitis (167800) resulting from gain-of-function mutations in the protease serine-1 gene (PRSS1; 276000) have a lifetime pancreatic cancer risk ratio of 57 and a cumulative incidence, to age 70 years, of 40% (Lowenfels et al., 1997). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
65917
Concept ID:
C0235974
Neoplastic Process
9.

Tumoral calcinosis

An extremely rare benign condition characterized by large calcified periarticular soft tissue masses composed of calcium salts, usually located around large joints. Tumoral calcinosis can occur due to HYPERPHOSPHATEMIA in patients with UREMIA and/or who are undergoing RENAL DIALYSIS. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
452340
Concept ID:
C0263628
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Pancreatic Neoplasms

Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
18279
Concept ID:
C0030297
Neoplastic Process
13.

Disorder of pancreas

The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces juices that help break down food and hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Problems with the pancreas can lead to many health problems. These include. -Pancreatitis, or inflammation of the pancreas: This happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. - Pancreatic cancer. - Cystic fibrosis, a genetic disorder in which thick, sticky mucus can also block tubes in your pancreas. The pancreas also plays a role in diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin because the body's immune system has attacked them. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14583
Concept ID:
C0030286
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Hereditary cancer-predisposing syndrome

The condition of a pattern of malignancies within a family, but not every individual's necessarily having the same neoplasm. Characteristically the tumor tends to occur at an earlier than average age, individuals may have more than one primary tumor, the tumors may be multicentric, usually more than 25 percent of the individuals in direct lineal descent from the proband are affected, and the cancer predisposition in these families behaves as an autosomal dominant trait with about 60 percent penetrance. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
14326
Concept ID:
C0027672
Neoplastic Process
15.

Disorder of endocrine system

Your endocrine system includes eight major glands throughout your body. These glands make hormones. Hormones are chemical messengers. They travel through your bloodstream to tissues or organs. Hormones work slowly and affect body processes from head to toe. These include. -Growth and development. -Metabolism - digestion, elimination, breathing, blood circulation and maintaining body temperature . -Sexual function. -Reproduction. -Mood. If your hormone levels are too high or too low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Stress, infection and changes in your blood's fluid and electrolyte balance can also influence hormone levels. In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are usually treated by controlling how much hormone your body makes. Hormone supplements can help if the problem is too little of a hormone.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4043
Concept ID:
C0014130
Disease or Syndrome
16.

B-K mole (nevus) syndrome

A condition that runs in certain families in which at least two members have dysplastic nevi (atypical moles) and have a tendency to develop melanoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
3937
Concept ID:
C0013403
Neoplastic Process
17.

Disorder of digestive system

When you eat, your body breaks food down to a form it can use to build and nourish cells and provide energy. This process is called digestion. . Your digestive system is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube. It runs from your mouth to your anus and includes your esophagus, stomach, and small and large intestines. Your liver, gallbladder and pancreas are also involved. They produce juices to help digestion. . There are many types of digestive disorders. The symptoms vary widely depending on the problem. In general, you should see your doctor if you have . -Blood in your stool. -Changes in bowel habits. -Severe abdominal pain. -Unintentional weight loss. -Heartburn not relieved by antacids. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3828
Concept ID:
C0012242
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Calcinosis

Structure with calcium deposition [from SNOMED CT]

MedGen UID:
709
Concept ID:
C0006663
Finding; Pathologic Function
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