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Items: 11

1.

Familial adenomatous polyposis 1

APC-associated polyposis conditions include: familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), attenuated FAP, Gardner syndrome, and Turcot syndrome. FAP is a colon cancer predisposition syndrome in which hundreds to thousands of precancerous colonic polyps develop, beginning, on average, at age 16 years (range 7-36 years). By age 35 years, 95% of individuals with FAP have polyps; without colectomy, colon cancer is inevitable. The mean age of colon cancer diagnosis in untreated individuals is 39 years (range 34-43 years). Extracolonic manifestations are variably present and include: polyps of the gastric fundus and duodenum, osteomas, dental anomalies, congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE), soft tissue tumors, desmoid tumors, and associated cancers. Attenuated FAP is characterized by a significant risk for colon cancer but fewer colonic polyps (average of 30), more proximally located polyps, and diagnosis of colon cancer at a later age; management may be substantially different. Gardner syndrome is characterized by colonic polyposis typical of FAP together with osteomas and soft tissue tumors. Turcot syndrome is the association of colonic polyposis and central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Differences in phenotype may relate to the location of the pathogenic variant within APC. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
398651
Concept ID:
C2713442
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Familial multiple polyposis syndrome

Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an inherited disorder characterized by cancer of the large intestine (colon) and rectum. People with the classic type of familial adenomatous polyposis may begin to develop multiple noncancerous (benign) growths (polyps) in the colon as early as their teenage years. Unless the colon is removed, these polyps will become malignant (cancerous). The average age at which an individual develops colon cancer in classic familial adenomatous polyposis is 39 years. Some people have a variant of the disorder, called attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis, in which polyp growth is delayed. The average age of colorectal cancer onset for attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis is 55 years.In people with classic familial adenomatous polyposis, the number of polyps increases with age, and hundreds to thousands of polyps can develop in the colon. Also of particular significance are noncancerous growths called desmoid tumors. These fibrous tumors usually occur in the tissue covering the intestines and may be provoked by surgery to remove the colon. Desmoid tumors tend to recur after they are surgically removed. In both classic familial adenomatous polyposis and its attenuated variant, benign and malignant tumors are sometimes found in other places in the body, including the duodenum (a section of the small intestine), stomach, bones, skin, and other tissues. People who have colon polyps as well as growths outside the colon are sometimes described as having Gardner syndrome.A milder type of familial adenomatous polyposis, called autosomal recessive familial adenomatous polyposis, has also been identified. People with the autosomal recessive type of this disorder have fewer polyps than those with the classic type. Fewer than 100 polyps typically develop, rather than hundreds or thousands. The autosomal recessive type of this disorder is caused by mutations in a different gene than the classic and attenuated types of familial adenomatous polyposis.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
46010
Concept ID:
C0032580
Neoplastic Process
3.

Indifference to pain, congenital, autosomal recessive

Congenital indifference to pain is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the complete absence of pain perception typically associated with noxious stimuli. Affected individuals are aware of a stimulus, but have lost the ability to perceive pain. Most patients are hyposmic or anosmic. Other sensory modalities are unaffected, and there is an absence of overt autonomic symptoms. Sural nerve biopsy and nerve conduction velocity studies are normal (summary by Cox et al., 2006; and Goldberg et al., 2012). Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IID (HSAN2D) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital or childhood-onset distal loss of pain and temperature sensation as well as autonomic dysfunction accompanied by hyposmia, hearing loss, hypogeusia, and sometimes bone dysplasia. The phenotype is highly variable, even within families. Two Japanese families have been reported (summary by Yuan et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HSAN, see HSAN1 (162400). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
344563
Concept ID:
C1855739
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Intestinal polyp

A discrete abnormal tissue mass that protrudes into the lumen of the intestine and is attached to the intestinal wall either by a stalk, pedunculus, or a broad base. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
9526
Concept ID:
C0021846
Anatomical Abnormality
5.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Hereditary cancer-predisposing syndrome

The condition of a pattern of malignancies within a family, but not every individual's necessarily having the same neoplasm. Characteristically the tumor tends to occur at an earlier than average age, individuals may have more than one primary tumor, the tumors may be multicentric, usually more than 25 percent of the individuals in direct lineal descent from the proband are affected, and the cancer predisposition in these families behaves as an autosomal dominant trait with about 60 percent penetrance. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
14326
Concept ID:
C0027672
Neoplastic Process
7.

Disorder of intestine

An abnormality of the intestine. The closely related term enteropathy is used to refer to any disease of the intestine. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7130
Concept ID:
C0021831
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Disorder of digestive system

When you eat, your body breaks food down to a form it can use to build and nourish cells and provide energy. This process is called digestion. . Your digestive system is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube. It runs from your mouth to your anus and includes your esophagus, stomach, and small and large intestines. Your liver, gallbladder and pancreas are also involved. They produce juices to help digestion. . There are many types of digestive disorders. The symptoms vary widely depending on the problem. In general, you should see your doctor if you have . -Blood in your stool. -Changes in bowel habits. -Severe abdominal pain. -Unintentional weight loss. -Heartburn not relieved by antacids. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3828
Concept ID:
C0012242
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Neoplasm of the large intestine

Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
3171
Concept ID:
C0009404
Neoplastic Process
10.

Large intestinal polyposis

The presence of multiple polyps in the large intestine. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
868164
Concept ID:
C4022556
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Large intestinal polyposis

The presence of multiple polyps in the large intestine. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
830608
Concept ID:
CN225063
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