Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Results: 1 to 20 of 55

1.

Fasciitis

Inflammation of the fascia. There are three major types: 1, Eosinophilic fasciitis, an inflammatory reaction with eosinophilia, producing hard thickened skin with an orange-peel configuration suggestive of scleroderma and considered by some a variant of scleroderma; 2, Necrotizing fasciitis (FASCIITIS, NECROTIZING), a serious fulminating infection (usually by a beta hemolytic streptococcus) causing extensive necrosis of superficial fascia; 3, Nodular/Pseudosarcomatous /Proliferative fasciitis, characterized by a rapid growth of fibroblasts with mononuclear inflammatory cells and proliferating capillaries in soft tissue, often the forearm; it is not malignant but is sometimes mistaken for fibrosarcoma. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
4658
Concept ID:
C0015645
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Cranial fasciitis

MedGen UID:
755655
Concept ID:
C2960488
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Fasciitis

Inflammation of fascia. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506478
Concept ID:
CN117430
Finding
4.

Recurrence (disease attribute)

The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
416712
Concept ID:
C2825055
Pathologic Function
5.

Point mutation

A mutation caused by the substitution of one nucleotide for another. This results in the DNA molecule having a change in a single base pair. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
56498
Concept ID:
C0162735
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
6.

Threonine

An essential amino acid occurring naturally in the L-form, which is the active form. It is found in eggs, milk, gelatin, and other proteins. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
52734
Concept ID:
C0040005
Pharmacologic Substance
7.

Familial multiple polyposis syndrome

Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an inherited disorder characterized by cancer of the large intestine (colon) and rectum. People with the classic type of familial adenomatous polyposis may begin to develop multiple noncancerous (benign) growths (polyps) in the colon as early as their teenage years. Unless the colon is removed, these polyps will become malignant (cancerous). The average age at which an individual develops colon cancer in classic familial adenomatous polyposis is 39 years. Some people have a variant of the disorder, called attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis, in which polyp growth is delayed. The average age of colorectal cancer onset for attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis is 55 years. In people with classic familial adenomatous polyposis, the number of polyps increases with age, and hundreds to thousands of polyps can develop in the colon. Also of particular significance are noncancerous growths called desmoid tumors. These fibrous tumors usually occur in the tissue covering the intestines and may be provoked by surgery to remove the colon. Desmoid tumors tend to recur after they are surgically removed. In both classic familial adenomatous polyposis and its attenuated variant, benign and malignant tumors are sometimes found in other places in the body, including the duodenum (a section of the small intestine), stomach, bones, skin, and other tissues. People who have colon polyps as well as growths outside the colon are sometimes described as having Gardner syndrome. A milder type of familial adenomatous polyposis, called autosomal recessive familial adenomatous polyposis, has also been identified. People with the autosomal recessive type of this disorder have fewer polyps than those with the classic type. Fewer than 100 polyps typically develop, rather than hundreds or thousands. The autosomal recessive type of this disorder is caused by mutations in a different gene than the classic and attenuated types of familial adenomatous polyposis.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
46010
Concept ID:
C0032580
Neoplastic Process
8.

Phosphorylation

A process in which a phosphate group is added to a molecule, such as a sugar or a protein. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10742
Concept ID:
C0031715
Molecular Function
9.

Diagnosis

The process of identifying a disease, such as cancer, from its signs and symptoms. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
8354
Concept ID:
C0011900
Finding
10.

Isoleucine

One of nine essential amino acids in humans (present in dietary proteins), Isoleucine has diverse physiological functions, such as assisting wound healing, detoxification of nitrogenous wastes, stimulating immune function, and promoting secretion of several hormones. Necessary for hemoglobin formation and regulating blood sugar and energy levels, isoleucine is concentrated in muscle tissues in humans. Isoleucine is found especially in meats, fish, cheese, eggs, and most seeds and nuts. (NCI04) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7172
Concept ID:
C0022192
Pharmacologic Substance
11.

adenomatous polyposis coli

MedGen UID:
832186
Concept ID:
CN198941
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
490043

13.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
488626

14.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
449379

15.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
433274

16.

Amyloidogenic transthyretin amyloidosis

Familial transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis is characterized by a slowly progressive peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy and autonomic neuropathy as well as non-neuropathic changes of cardiomyopathy, nephropathy, vitreous opacities, and CNS amyloidosis. The disease usually begins in the third to fifth decade in persons from endemic foci in Portugal and Japan; onset is later in persons from other areas. Typically, sensory neuropathy starts in the lower extremities with paresthesias and hypesthesias of the feet, followed within a few years by motor neuropathy. In some persons, particularly those with early onset disease, autonomic neuropathy is the first manifestation of the condition; findings can include: orthostatic hypotension, constipation alternating with diarrhea, attacks of nausea and vomiting, delayed gastric emptying, sexual impotence, anhidrosis, and urinary retention or incontinence. Cardiac amyloidosis is mainly characterized by progressive cardiomyopathy. Individuals with leptomeningeal amyloidosis may have the following CNS findings: dementia, psychosis, visual impairment, headache, seizures, motor paresis, ataxia, myelopathy, hydrocephalus, or intracranial hemorrhage. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
414031
Concept ID:
C2751492
Disease or Syndrome
17.

History of previous events

The aggregate of past events; the continuum of events occurring in succession leading from the past to the present; a record or narrative description of past events. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
389153
Concept ID:
C2004062
Finding
18.

Staining (finding)

MedGen UID:
352872
Concept ID:
C1704680
Finding
19.

Polyposis

The development of numerous polyps (growths that protrude from a mucous membrane). [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
137722
Concept ID:
C0334108
Neoplastic Process
20.

Nonsense mutation

A mutation that converts a sense codon (CODON) into a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR) or an unassigned codon and leads to the formation of truncated proteins. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
107464
Concept ID:
C0544885
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction

Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...