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Results: 1 to 20 of 23

1.

Sarcoma

A malignant mesenchymal neoplasm. A general term for which the transformed cell type has not been specified. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
224714
Concept ID:
C1261473
Neoplastic Process
2.

Able

MedGen UID:
721424
Concept ID:
C1299581
Finding
3.

Ewing's sarcoma

A malignant tumor of the bone which always arises in the medullary tissue, occurring more often in cylindrical bones. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506718
Concept ID:
CN168774
Finding
4.

Sarcoma

The presence of a `sarcoma` (MPATH:551). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506452
Concept ID:
CN117138
Finding
5.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
449782

6.

Peripheral neuroepithelioma

The Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (primitive neuroectodermal tumors; PNET) comprise morphologically heterogeneous tumors that are characterized by nonrandom chromosomal translocations involving the EWS gene on chromosome 22q12 and one of several members of the ETS family of transcription factors. The tumors include Ewing sarcoma, peripheral neuroepithelioma, and Askin tumor. In approximately 90% of cases of ESFT, the FLI1 gene (193067) on chromosome 11 is the fusion partner of EWS; in approximately 10%, the EWS fusion partner is the ERG gene (165080) on chromosome 22. Many other ETS family members have been identified as fusion partners of EWS, but these cases are rare (Khoury, 2005). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
151926
Concept ID:
C0684337
Neoplastic Process
7.

Ewing's sarcoma

Ewing sarcoma is a cancerous tumor that occurs in bones or soft tissues, such as cartilage or nerves. There are several types of Ewing sarcoma, including Ewing sarcoma of bone, extraosseous Ewing sarcoma, peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (pPNET), and Askin tumor. These tumors are considered to be related because they have similar genetic causes. These types of Ewing sarcoma can be distinguished from one another by the tissue in which the tumor develops. Approximately 87 percent of Ewing sarcomas are Ewing sarcoma of bone, which is a bone tumor that usually occurs in the thigh bones (femurs), pelvis, ribs, or shoulder blades. Extraosseous (or extraskeletal) Ewing sarcoma describes tumors in the soft tissues around bones, such as cartilage. pPNETs occur in nerve tissue and can be found in many parts of the body. A type of pPNET found in the chest is called Askin tumor. Ewing sarcomas most often occur in children and young adults. Affected individuals usually feel stiffness, pain, swelling, or tenderness of the bone or surrounding tissue. Sometimes, there is a lump near the surface of the skin that feels warm and soft to the touch. Often, children have a fever that does not go away. Ewing sarcoma of bone can cause weakening of the involved bone, and affected individuals may have a broken bone with no obvious cause. It is common for Ewing sarcoma to spread to other parts of the body (metastasize), usually to the lungs, to other bones, or to the bone marrow.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
107816
Concept ID:
C0553580
Neoplastic Process
8.

Context

The universe of discourse that surrounds a language unit and helps to determine its interpretation. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
105274
Concept ID:
C0449255
Finding
9.

Chromosomal translocation

Any type of genetic recombination involving exchange of DNA between non-homologous chromosomes, which often occurs as the result of non-homologous end-joining of broken DNA strands. Chromosomal translocation is involved in repairing broken DNA and in maintaining cell viability at the expense of long term genomic stability. This process is is associated with particular types of leukemia, infertility and Down Syndrome. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
21243
Concept ID:
C0040715
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
10.

The origin, production or development of cancer through genotypic and phenotypic changes which upset the normal balance between cell proliferation and cell death. Carcinogenesis generally requires a constellation of steps, which may occur quickly or over a period of many years. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
154544
Concept ID:
C0596263
11.

Neoplasms, Bone Tissue

Neoplasms composed of bony tissue, whether normal or of a soft tissue which has become ossified. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in bones. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
104905
Concept ID:
C0206639
Neoplastic Process
12.

Epithelioid sarcoma

An aggressive malignant neoplasm of uncertain lineage, characterized by the presence of epithelioid cells forming nodular patterns. The nodules often undergo central necrosis, resulting in a pseudogranulomatous growth pattern. It usually occurs in young adults. The most common sites of involvement are the extremities (distal-type epithelioid sarcoma), and less frequently the pelvis, perineum, and genital organs (proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
104753
Concept ID:
C0205944
Neoplastic Process
13.

Connective and Soft Tissue Neoplasm

Neoplasms developing from some structure of the connective and subcutaneous tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in connective or soft tissue. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
60224
Concept ID:
C0206765
Neoplastic Process
14.

Neoplasm of connective tissues

Neoplasms composed of connective tissue, including elastic, mucous, reticular, osseous, and cartilaginous tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in connective tissue. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
45035
Concept ID:
C0027656
Neoplastic Process
15.

Neoplastic Processes

The pathological mechanisms and forms taken by tissue during degeneration into a neoplasm and its subsequent activity. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
14325
Concept ID:
C0027671
Neoplastic Process
16.

Disorder of bone

Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly throughout your life. During childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about age 20, you can lose bone faster than you make bone. To have strong bones when you are young, and to prevent bone loss when you are older, you need to get enough calcium, vitamin D and exercise. . There are many kinds of bone problems:: - Low bone density and osteoporosis, which make your bones weak and more likely to break . - Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle . - Paget's disease of bone makes them weak . - Bone disease can make bones easy to break . - Bones can also develop cancer and infections. - Other bone diseases are caused by poor nutrition, genetic factors or problems with the rate of bone growth or rebuilding. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14182
Concept ID:
C0005940
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Osteosarcoma

A malignant neoplasm usually arising from bone. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10501
Concept ID:
C0029463
Neoplastic Process
18.

Neoplasms by Site

A collective term for precoordinated organ/neoplasm headings locating neoplasms by organ, as BRAIN NEOPLASMS; DUODENAL NEOPLASMS; LIVER NEOPLASMS; etc. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10296
Concept ID:
C0027653
Neoplastic Process
19.

Neoplasms by Histologic Type

A collective term for the various histological types of NEOPLASMS. It is more likely to be used by searchers than by indexers and catalogers. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10295
Concept ID:
C0027652
Neoplastic Process
20.

Disorder of musculoskeletal system

condition in which there is a deviation from or interruption of the normal structure or function of any muscles, bones, or cartilages of the body. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
6471
Concept ID:
C0026857
Disease or Syndrome

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