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Results: 6

1.

Disorder of coronary artery

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened and narrowed. This is due to the buildup of cholesterol and other material, called plaque, on their inner walls. This buildup is called atherosclerosis. As it grows, less blood can flow through the arteries. As a result, the heart muscle can't get the blood or oxygen it needs. This can lead to chest pain (angina) or a heart attack. Most heart attacks happen when a blood clot suddenly cuts off the hearts' blood supply, causing permanent heart damage. . Over time, CAD can also weaken the heart muscle and contribute to heart failure and arrhythmias. Heart failure means the heart can't pump blood well to the rest of the body. Arrhythmias are changes in the normal beating rhythm of the heart. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
365486
Concept ID:
C1956346
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Atherosclerosis

Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries. Plaque is a sticky substance made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood. Over time, plaque hardens and narrows your arteries. That limits the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your body. Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including: -Coronary artery disease. These arteries supply blood to your heart. When they are blocked, you can suffer angina or a heart attack. -Carotid artery disease. These arteries supply blood to your brain. When they are blocked you can suffer a stroke. -Peripheral arterial disease. These arteries are in your arms, legs and pelvis. When they are blocked, you can suffer from numbness, pain and sometimes infections. Atherosclerosis usually doesn't cause symptoms until it severely narrows or totally blocks an artery. Many people don't know they have it until they have a medical emergency. A physical exam, imaging, and other diagnostic tests can tell if you have it. Medicines can slow the progress of plaque buildup. Your doctor may also recommend procedures such as angioplasty to open the arteries, or surgery on the coronary or carotid arteries. Lifestyle changes can also help. These include following a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, quitting smoking, and managing stress. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
13948
Concept ID:
C0004153
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Atherosclerosis

A condition characterized by patchy atheromas or atherosclerotic plaques which develop in the walls of medium-sized and large arteries and can lead to arterial stenosis with reduced or blocked blood flow. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505298
Concept ID:
CN002382
Finding
4.

Coronary artery disease

Reduction of the diameter of the coronary arteries as the result of an accumulation of atheromatous plaques within the walls of the coronary arteries, which increases the risk of myocardial ischemia. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504904
Concept ID:
CN001526
Finding
5.

Disease regression

Return to a former state; a subsidence of the symptoms of a disease process; in cancer, a decrease in the size of a tumor or in the extent of cancer in the body. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
195771
Concept ID:
C0684320
Pathologic Function
6.

Coronary heart disease

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened and narrowed. This is due to the buildup of cholesterol and other material, called plaque, on their inner walls. This buildup is called atherosclerosis. As it grows, less blood can flow through the arteries. As a result, the heart muscle can't get the blood or oxygen it needs. This can lead to chest pain (angina) or a heart attack. Most heart attacks happen when a blood clot suddenly cuts off the hearts' blood supply, causing permanent heart damage. . Over time, CAD can also weaken the heart muscle and contribute to heart failure and arrhythmias. Heart failure means the heart can't pump blood well to the rest of the body. Arrhythmias are changes in the normal beating rhythm of the heart. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3624
Concept ID:
C0010068
Disease or Syndrome

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