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Results: 1 to 20 of 32

1.

Leigh's disease

Leigh syndrome is an early-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a characteristic neuropathology consisting of focal, bilateral lesions in one or more areas of the central nervous system, including the brainstem, thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The lesions are areas of demyelination, gliosis, necrosis, spongiosis, or capillary proliferation. Clinical symptoms depend on which areas of the central nervous system are involved. The most common underlying cause is a defect in oxidative phosphorylation (Dahl, 1998). Leigh syndrome may be a feature of a deficiency of any of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes: complex I deficiency (252010), complex II deficiency (252011), complex III deficiency (124000), complex IV deficiency (cytochrome c oxidase; 220110), or complex V deficiency (604273). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
44095
Concept ID:
C0023264
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Leigh syndrome

MedGen UID:
831253
Concept ID:
CN205177
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Independent

MedGen UID:
721426
Concept ID:
C1299583
Finding
4.

Mitochondrial inheritance

A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on the mitochondrial genome. Because the mitochondrial genome is essentially always maternally inherited, a mitochondrial condition can only be transmitted by females, although the condition can affect both sexes. The proportion of mutant mitochondria can vary (heteroplasmy). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504838
Concept ID:
CN001305
Finding
5.

Respiratory Chain

MedGen UID:
57891
Concept ID:
C0162362
Molecular Function
6.

Juvenile myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis AND stroke

MELAS syndrome, comprising mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes, is a genetically heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with a variable clinical phenotype. The disorder is accompanied by features of central nervous system involvement, including seizures, hemiparesis, hemianopsia, cortical blindness, and episodic vomiting (Pavlakis et al., 1984; Montagna et al., 1988). Other mitochondrial encephalomyopathies include Leigh syndrome (LS; 256000), Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS; 530000), MERRF syndrome (545000), and Leber optic atrophy (535000). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
56485
Concept ID:
C0162671
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
8.

En(a-) phenotype

MedGen UID:
714462
Concept ID:
C1292209
Finding
9.

Muscular hypotonia

Muscular hypotonia is an abnormally low muscle tone (the amount of tension or resistance to movement in a muscle), often involving reduced muscle strength. Hypotonia is characterized by a diminished resistance to passive stretching. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504768
Concept ID:
CN001147
Finding
10.

Mutant

An altered form of an individual, organism, population, or genetic character that differs from the corresponding wild type due to one or more alterations (mutations). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
109303
Concept ID:
C0596988
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
11.

Muscle hypotonia

A diminution of the skeletal muscle tone marked by a diminished resistance to passive stretching. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10133
Concept ID:
C0026827
Sign or Symptom
12.

Genetic Diseases, Inborn

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Brain Diseases, Metabolic, Inborn

Brain disorders resulting from inborn metabolic errors, primarily from enzymatic defects which lead to substrate accumulation, product reduction, or increase in toxic metabolites through alternate pathways. The majority of these conditions are familial, however spontaneous mutation may also occur in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
156005
Concept ID:
C0752109
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Mitochondrial diseases

Mitochondrial diseases are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that arise as a result of dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be caused by mutation of genes encoded by either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). While some mitochondrial disorders only affect a single organ (e.g., the eye in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy [LHON]), many involve multiple organ systems and often present with prominent neurologic and myopathic features. Mitochondrial disorders may present at any age. Many individuals with a mutation of mtDNA display a cluster of clinical features that fall into a discrete clinical syndrome, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF), neurogenic weakness with ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP), or Leigh syndrome (LS). However, considerable clinical variability exists and many individuals do not fit neatly into one particular category, which is well-illustrated by the overlapping spectrum of disease phenotypes (including mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) resulting from mutation of the nuclear gene POLG, which has emerged as a major cause of mitochondrial disease. Common clinical features of mitochondrial disease – whether involving a mitochondrial or nuclear gene – include ptosis, external ophthalmoplegia, proximal myopathy and exercise intolerance, cardiomyopathy, sensorineural deafness, optic atrophy, pigmentary retinopathy, and diabetes mellitus. Common central nervous system findings are fluctuating encephalopathy, seizures, dementia, migraine, stroke-like episodes, ataxia, and spasticity. A high incidence of mid- and late pregnancy loss is a common occurrence that often goes unrecognized. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
155901
Concept ID:
C0751651
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Point mutation

A mutation caused by the substitution of one nucleotide for another. This results in the DNA molecule having a change in a single base pair. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
56498
Concept ID:
C0162735
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
16.

Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases

A collective term for nutritional disorders resulting from poor absorption or nutritional imbalance, and metabolic disorders resulting from defects in biosynthesis (ANABOLISM) or breakdown (CATABOLISM) of endogenous substances. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
45164
Concept ID:
C0028715
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Inborn error of pyruvate metabolism

Hereditary disorders of pyruvate metabolism. They are difficult to diagnose and describe because pyruvate is a key intermediate in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Some inherited metabolic disorders may alter pyruvate metabolism indirectly. Disorders in pyruvate metabolism appear to lead to deficiencies in neurotransmitter synthesis and, consequently, to nervous system disorders. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
19612
Concept ID:
C0034350
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Disorder of nervous system

The brain, spinal cord, and nerves make up the nervous system. Together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can have trouble moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing, or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses, or mood. There are more than 600 neurologic diseases. Major types include: - Diseases caused by faulty genes, such as Huntington's disease and muscular dystrophy. - Problems with the way the nervous system develops, such as spina bifida. - Degenerative diseases, where nerve cells are damaged or die, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. - Diseases of the blood vessels that supply the brain, such as stroke. - Injuries to the spinal cord and brain. - Seizure disorders, such as epilepsy . - Cancer, such as brain tumors. - infections, such as meningitis.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14336
Concept ID:
C0027765
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities

Diseases existing at birth and often before birth, or that develop during the first month of life (INFANT, NEWBORN, DISEASES), regardless of causation. Of these diseases, those characterized by structural deformities are termed CONGENITAL ABNORMALITIES. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
14319
Concept ID:
C0027612
Disease or Syndrome

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