Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 13

1.

Encephalopathy, mitochondrial

MedGen UID:
342221
Concept ID:
C1852373
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Citrullinemia type I

Citrullinemia type I (CTLN1) presents as a clinical spectrum that includes an acute neonatal form (the "classic" form), a milder late-onset form, a form without symptoms or hyperammonemia, and a form in which women have onset of severe symptoms during pregnancy or post partum. Distinction between the clinical forms is based on clinical findings and is not clear-cut. Infants with the acute neonatal form appear normal at birth. Shortly thereafter, they develop hyperammonemia and become progressively lethargic, feed poorly, often vomit, and may develop signs of increased intracranial pressure (ICP). Without prompt intervention, hyperammonemia and the accumulation of other toxic metabolites (e.g., glutamine) result in ICP, increased neuromuscular tone, spasticity, ankle clonus, seizures, loss of consciousness, and death. Children with the severe form who are treated promptly may survive for an indeterminate period of time, but usually with significant neurologic deficits. The late-onset form may be milder than that seen in the acute neonatal form, for unknown reasons. The episodes of hyperammonemia are similar to those seen in the acute neonatal form, but the initial neurologic findings may be more subtle because of the older age of the affected individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
104491
Concept ID:
C0175683
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Hepatocellular carcinoma

Hepatocellular carcinoma is the major histologic type of malignant primary liver neoplasm. It is the fifth most common cancer and the third most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. The major risk factors for HCC are chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, prolonged dietary aflatoxin exposure, alcoholic cirrhosis, and cirrhosis due to other causes. Hepatoblastomas comprise 1 to 2% of all malignant neoplasms of childhood, most often occurring in children under 3 years of age. Hepatoblastomas are thought to be derived from undifferentiated hepatocytes (Taniguchi et al., 2002). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
389187
Concept ID:
C2239176
Neoplastic Process
4.

Hepatocellular carcinoma

MedGen UID:
358104
Concept ID:
C1867955
Finding
5.

Citrullinemia type II

Citrin deficiency can manifest in newborns as neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency (NICCD), in older children as failure to thrive and dyslipidemia caused by citrin deficiency (FTTDCD), and in adults as recurrent hyperammonemia with neuropsychiatric symptoms in citrullinemia type II (CTLN2). Often citrin deficiency is characterized by fondness for protein-rich and/or lipid-rich foods and aversion to carbohydrate-rich foods. taba: NICCD. Children younger than age one year have growth retardation with transient intrahepatic cholestasis, hepatomegaly, diffuse fatty liver, and parenchymal cellular infiltration associated with hepatic fibrosis, variable liver dysfunction, hypoproteinemia, decreased coagulation factors, hemolytic anemia, and/or hypoglycemia. Although NICCD is generally not severe and symptoms often resolve by age one year with appropriate treatment, some infants succumb to infection and liver cirrhosis and others require liver transplantation. FTTDCD. Around age one to two years, many children with citrin deficiency develop the food preferences mentioned. Some have growth retardation, hypoglycemia, and fatigue as well as hyperlipidemia, pancreatitis, fatty liver, and hepatoma. One or more decades later, some individuals with NICCD or FTTDCD develop CTLN2. CTLN2. Onset is sudden and usually between ages 11 and 79 years. Manifestations are recurrent hyperammonemia with neuropsychiatric symptoms including nocturnal delirium, aggression, irritability, hyperactivity, delusions, disorientation, restlessness, drowsiness, loss of memory, flapping tremor, convulsive seizures, and coma; death can result from brain edema. Symptoms are often provoked by alcohol and sugar intake, medication, and/or surgery. Affected individuals may or may not have a prior history of NICCD or FTTDCD. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
350276
Concept ID:
C1863844
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Disorder of the urea cycle metabolism

The urea cycle disorders (UCD) result from defects in the metabolism of waste nitrogen from the breakdown of protein and other nitrogen-containing molecules. Severe deficiency or total absence of activity of any of the first four enzymes (CPS1, OTC, ASS, ASL) in the urea cycle or the cofactor producer (NAGS) results in the accumulation of ammonia and other precursor metabolites during the first few days of life. Infants with a severe urea cycle disorder are normal at birth but rapidly develop cerebral edema and the related signs of lethargy, anorexia, hyper- or hypoventilation, hypothermia, seizures, neurologic posturing, and coma. In milder (or partial) deficiencies of these enzymes and in arginase (ARG) deficiency, ammonia accumulation may be triggered by illness or stress at almost any time of life. In these disorders the elevations of plasma ammonia concentration and symptoms are often subtle and the first recognized clinical episode may not occur for months or decades. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
57586
Concept ID:
C0154246
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Disorder of the central nervous system

A structural abnormality of the central nervous system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
3306
Concept ID:
C0007682
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Disorder of amino acid metabolism

Disorders affecting amino acid metabolism. The majority of these disorders are inherited and present in the neonatal period with metabolic disturbances (e.g., ACIDOSIS) and neurologic manifestations. They are present at birth, although they may not become symptomatic until later in life. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
1867
Concept ID:
C0002514
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Citrullinemia type I

Citrullinemia type I is a rare autosomal recessive urea cycle defect characterized biologically by hyperammonemia and clinically by progressive lethargy, poor feeding and vomiting in the neonatal form (Acute neonatal citrullinemia type I, see this term) and by variable hyperammonemia in the later-onset form (Adult-onset citrullinemia type I, see this term). [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
831929
Concept ID:
CN201792
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Adult-onset citrullinemia type I

Adult-onset citrullinemia type I is a form of citrullinemia type I (see this term) characterized clinically by adult onset of symptoms including variable hyperammonemia and less striking neurological findings which may include intense headache, scotomas, migraine-like episodes, ataxia, slurred speech, lethargy and drowsiness. Serious increased intracranial pressure may occur. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
831252
Concept ID:
CN201794
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Acute neonatal citrullinemia type I

Acute neonatal citrullinemia type I is a severe form of citrullinemia type 1 (see this term) characterized biologically by hyperammonemia and clinically by progressive lethargy, poor feeding and vomiting, seizures and possible loss of consciousness, within one to a few days of birth, with variable signs of increased intracranial pressure. The condition can lead to significant neurologic deficits. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
797477
Concept ID:
CN201793
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...