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Results: 4

1.

Keloid formation

Keloid is a dermal fibroproliferative growth caused by pathologic wound healing following skin injury. Keloid is defined as a scar growing continuously and invasively beyond the confines of the original wound and is characterized by excessive fibroblast proliferation and deposition of extracellular matrix and collagen fibers. Local tissue factors, especially wound tension or infection, and endocrine factors are known to be involved in keloid formation. However, the fact that the incidence of keloid is higher in darker-skinned individuals suggests that genetic factors also play an important role (summary by Nakashima et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
7197
Concept ID:
C0022548
2.

Nevus

A nevus is a type of hamartoma that is a circumscribed stable malformation of the skin. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
425158
Concept ID:
CN003400
Finding
3.

Cicatrix

A scar is a permanent patch of skin that grows over a wound. It forms when your body heals itself after a cut, scrape, burn or sore. You can also get scars from surgery that cuts through the skin, from infections like chickenpox, or skin conditions like acne. Scars are often thicker, as well as pinker, redder or shinier, than the rest of your skin. . How your scar looks depends on: - How big and deep your wound is. - Where it is . - How long it takes to heal . - Your age. - Your inherited tendency to scar. Scars usually fade over time but never go away completely. If the way a scar looks bothers you, various treatments might minimize it. These include surgical revision, dermabrasion, laser treatments, injections, chemical peels and creams. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
384469
Concept ID:
C2004491
Pathologic Function
4.

Blue Nevus

Usually a benign tumor, that commonly presents as a solitary blue nodule with spindled MELANOCYTES covered by smooth SKIN. Several variants have been identified, one variant being malignant. The blue color is caused by large, densely packed melanocytes deep in the DERMIS of the nevus. In CHILDREN, they usually occur on the BUTTOCKS and LUMBOSACRAL REGION and are referred to as cellular blue nevi. Malignant blue nevi are more commonly found on the SCALP. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
104930
Concept ID:
C0206736
Neoplastic Process

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