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Results: 20

1.

Mutagenesis Process

Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
86969
Concept ID:
C0079866
Molecular Function
2.

Infection

Unknown contamination with disease-producing germs. [from HHCC]

MedGen UID:
43874
Concept ID:
C0021311
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Communicable Diseases

Infectious diseases kill more people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living things that are found everywhere - in air, soil and water. You can get infected by touching, eating, drinking or breathing something that contains a germ. Germs can also spread through animal and insect bites, kissing and sexual contact. Vaccines, proper hand washing and medicines can help prevent infections. . There are four main kinds of germs: : - Bacteria - one-celled germs that multiply quickly and may release chemicals which can make you sick. - Viruses - capsules that contain genetic material, and use your own cells to multiply. - Fungi - primitive plants, like mushrooms or mildew . - Protozoa - one-celled animals that use other living things for food and a place to live. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1057
Concept ID:
C0009450
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Pathogenesis

specific processes that generate the ability of an organism to cause disease [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
195936
Concept ID:
C0699748
Pathologic Function
5.

Mutant

An altered form of an individual, organism, population, or genetic character that differs from the corresponding wild type due to one or more alterations (mutations). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
109303
Concept ID:
C0596988
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
6.

Adhesion

Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They might connect the loops of the intestines to each other, to nearby organs, or to the wall of the abdomen. They can pull sections of the intestines out of place. This may block food from passing through the intestine. Adhesions can occur anywhere in the body. But they often form after surgery on the abdomen. Almost everyone who has surgery on the abdomen gets adhesions. Some adhesions don't cause any problems. But when they partly or completely block the intestines, they cause symptoms such as: -Severe abdominal pain or cramping. -Vomiting. -Bloating. -An inability to pass gas. -Constipation. Adhesions can sometimes cause infertility in women by preventing fertilized eggs from reaching the uterus. No tests are available to detect adhesions. Doctors usually find them during surgery to diagnose other problems. Some adhesions go away by themselves. If they partly block your intestines, a diet low in fiber can allow food to move easily through the affected area. If you have a complete intestinal obstruction, it is life threatening. You should get immediate medical attention and may need surgery. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7891
Concept ID:
C0001511
Pathologic Function
7.

Sequence Deletion

Deletion of sequences of nucleic acids from the genetic material of an individual. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
102460
Concept ID:
C0162773
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
8.

Disease due to Gram-negative bacteria

Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
88406
Concept ID:
C0085423
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Sepsis

Sepsis is a serious illness. It happens when your body has an overwhelming immune response to a bacterial infection. The chemicals released into the blood to fight the infection trigger widespread inflammation. This leads to blood clots and leaky blood vessels. They cause poor blood flow, which deprives your body's organs of nutrients and oxygen. In severe cases, one or more organs fail. In the worst cases, blood pressure drops and the heart weakens, leading to septic shock. Anyone can get sepsis, but the risk is higher in: -People with weakened immune systems. -Infants and children. -The elderly. -People with chronic illnesses, such as diabetes, AIDS, cancer, and kidney or liver disease. -People suffering from a severe burn or physical trauma. Common symptoms of sepsis are fever, chills, rapid breathing and heart rate, rash, confusion, and disorientation. Doctors diagnose sepsis using a blood test to see if the number of white blood cells is abnormal. They also do lab tests that check for signs of infection. People with sepsis are usually treated in hospital intensive care units. Doctors try to treat the infection, sustain the vital organs, and prevent a drop in blood pressure. Many patients receive oxygen and intravenous fluids. Other types of treatment, such as respirators or kidney dialysis, may be necessary. Sometimes, surgery is needed to clear up an infection. NIH: National Institute of General Medical Sciences.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
69314
Concept ID:
C0243026
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome

A serious condition in which there is inflammation throughout the whole body. It may be caused by a severe bacterial infection (sepsis), trauma, or pancreatitis. It is marked by fast heart rate, low blood pressure, low or high body temperature, and low or high white blood cell count. The condition may lead to multiple organ failure and shock. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
69303
Concept ID:
C0242966
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Septicemia

Sepsis is a life-threatening illness. Your body's response to a bacterial infection usually causes it. Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, old people and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from it. A quick diagnosis can be crucial, because one third of people who get sepsis die from it. Sepsis is usually treated in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU). IV antibiotics and fluids may be given to try to knock out the infection and to keep blood pressure from dropping too low. Patients may also need respirators to help them breathe.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
48626
Concept ID:
C0036690
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Trench fever

An intermittent fever characterized by intervals of chills, fever, and splenomegaly each of which may last as long as 40 hours. It is caused by BARTONELLA QUINTANA and transmitted by the human louse. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
21637
Concept ID:
C0040830
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Pyemia

Septicemia caused by pyogenic microorganisms (e.g., STAPHYLOCOCCUS; BACILLUS), resulting in the formation of secondary foci of SUPPURATION and multiple ABSCESSES. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
18779
Concept ID:
C0034189
Pathologic Function
14.

Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese. But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli. Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14012
Concept ID:
C0004623
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Inflammation

A microscopic finding indicating the presence of acute, subacute or chronic inflammation in a tissue sample. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7072
Concept ID:
C0021368
Pathologic Function
16.

Bartonellaceae Infections

Infections with bacteria of the family BARTONELLACEAE. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
2171
Concept ID:
C0004773
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Bacterial Infections and Mycoses

Infections caused by bacteria and fungi, general, specified, or unspecified. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
2161
Concept ID:
C0004615
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Bartonellosis

A gram-negative bacterial infection caused by Bartonella bacilliformis. It is transmitted by ticks, flies and mosquitoes. Signs and symptoms include fever, headache, muscle pain, enlargement of the lymph nodes and anemia. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
504
Concept ID:
C0004771
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Bacteremia

The presence of viable bacteria circulating in the blood. Fever, chills, tachycardia, and tachypnea are common acute manifestations of bacteremia. The majority of cases are seen in already hospitalized patients, most of whom have underlying diseases or procedures which render their bloodstreams susceptible to invasion. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
482
Concept ID:
C0004610
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Phase of fever - finding

MedGen UID:
709988
Concept ID:
C1287526
Sign or Symptom

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