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Results: 17

1.

Male gender

A person who belongs to the sex that normally produces sperm. The term is used to indicate biological sex distinctions, cultural gender role distinctions, or both. (NCI) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7446
Concept ID:
C0024554
Finding
2.

Malignant tumor of breast

Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States than any cancer except lung cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. Risks that you cannot change include: -Age - the chance of getting breast cancer rises as a woman gets older . -Genes - there are two genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, that greatly increase the risk. Women who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested. . -Personal factors - beginning periods before age 12 or going through menopause after age 55. Other risks include being overweight, using hormone replacement therapy (also called menopausal hormone therapy), taking birth control pills, drinking alcohol, not having children or having your first child after age 35 or having dense breasts. Symptoms of breast cancer may include a lump in the breast, a change in size or shape of the breast or discharge from a nipple. Breast self-exam and mammography can help find breast cancer early when it is most treatable. Treatment may consist of radiation, lumpectomy, mastectomy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy. Men can have breast cancer, too, but the number of cases is small. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
651
Concept ID:
C0006142
Neoplastic Process
3.

Breast carcinoma

The presence of a `carcinoma` (MPATH:549) of the `breast` (FMA:9601). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
428324
Concept ID:
CN002714
Finding
4.

BRCA2 gene mutation

A mutation that is typically a heritable, permanent change in the nucleotide sequence of the BRCA2 gene. Single nucleotide substitutions and small deletions or insertions (1-20 bases) account for the majority of mutations in the BRCA2 gene. Most of these alterations result in a truncated form of the breast cancer type 2 susceptibility protein. Mutations in the BRCA2 gene predispose males to breast cancer. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
267020
Concept ID:
C1511024
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
5.

Neoplasm of breast

Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
264172
Concept ID:
C1458155
Neoplastic Process
6.

Carcinoma of male breast

Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between the ages of 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. Other breast symptoms can include: -Dimpled or puckered skin. -A red, scaly nipple or skin. -Fluid discharge. Risk factors for male breast cancer include exposure to radiation, a family history of breast cancer, and having high estrogen levels, which can happen with diseases like cirrhosis or Klinefelter's syndrome. Treatment for male breast cancer is usually a mastectomy, which is surgery to remove the breast. Other treatments include radiation, chemotherapy and/or hormone therapy. . NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
68650
Concept ID:
C0238033
Neoplastic Process
7.

Malignant neoplastic disease

Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body. . Cancer is not just one disease but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Most treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Some may involve hormone therapy, biologic therapy, or stem cell transplantation. . NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14297
Concept ID:
C0006826
Neoplastic Process
8.

Carcinoma

type of cancer [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
2867
Concept ID:
C0007097
Neoplastic Process
9.

BRCA1 gene mutation

A mutation that is typically a heritable, permanent change in the nucleotide sequence of the BRCA1 gene. Single nucleotide substitutions and small deletions or insertions (1-20 bases) account for the majority of mutations in the BRCA1 gene. Approximately 75% of these alterations result in a truncated form of the breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein. Mutations in the BRCA1 gene predispose individuals to breast and ovarian cancers. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
267018
Concept ID:
C1511022
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
10.

Carcinoma of breast

Cancer that forms in tissues of the breast, usually the ducts (tubes that carry milk to the nipple) and lobules (glands that make milk). It occurs in both men and women, although male breast cancer is rare. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
146260
Concept ID:
C0678222
Neoplastic Process
11.

Disease Attributes

Clinical characteristics of disease or illness. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
199876
Concept ID:
C0752357
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Neoplasm of male breast

Any neoplasms of the male breast. These occur infrequently in males in developed countries, the incidence being about 1% of that in females. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
66983
Concept ID:
C0242788
Neoplastic Process
13.

Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases

A collective term for diseases of the skin and its appendages and of connective tissue. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
59786
Concept ID:
C0175166
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Disorder of skin

Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It is, in terms of both weight, between 6 and 9 pounds, and surface area, about 2 square yards. Your skin separates the inside of your body from the outside world. It: -Protects you from bacteria and viruses that can cause infections. -Helps you sense the outside world, such as whether it is hot or cold, wet or dry. -Regulates your body temperature . Conditions that irritate, clog or inflame your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning and itching. Allergies, irritants, your genetic makeup and certain diseases and immune system problems can cause dermatitis, hives and other skin conditions. Many skin problems, such as acne, also affect your appearance.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20777
Concept ID:
C0037274
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Neoplasms by Site

A collective term for precoordinated organ/neoplasm headings locating neoplasms by organ, as BRAIN NEOPLASMS; DUODENAL NEOPLASMS; LIVER NEOPLASMS; etc. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10296
Concept ID:
C0027653
Neoplastic Process
16.

Elderly person

A person 65 through 79 years of age. For a person older than 79 years, AGED, 80 AND OVER is available. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7927
Concept ID:
C0001792
Finding
17.

Disorder of breast

Most women experience breast changes at some time. Your age, hormone levels, and medicines you take may cause lumps, bumps, and discharges (fluids that are not breast milk). If you have a breast lump, pain, discharge or skin irritation, see your health care provider. Minor and serious breast problems have similar symptoms. Although many women fear cancer, most breast problems are not cancer. Some common breast changes are: -Fibrocystic breast changes - lumpiness, thickening and swelling, often just before a woman's period. -Cysts - fluid-filled lumps. -Fibroadenomas - solid, round, rubbery lumps that move easily when pushed, occurring most in younger women. -Intraductal papillomas - growths similar to warts near the nipple. -Blocked milk ducts. -Milk production when a woman is not breastfeeding. NIH: National Cancer Institute .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
652
Concept ID:
C0006145
Disease or Syndrome

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