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Results: 1 to 20 of 66

1.

Malignant Lung Neoplasm

Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and the earlier you started smoking, the greater your risk of lung cancer. High levels of pollution, radiation and asbestos exposure may also increase risk. . Common symptoms of lung cancer include: -A cough that doesn't go away and gets worse over time. -Constant chest pain. -Coughing up blood. -Shortness of breath, wheezing, or hoarseness. -Repeated problems with pneumonia or bronchitis. -Swelling of the neck and face. -Loss of appetite or weight loss. -Fatigue. There are many types of lung cancer. Each type of lung cancer grows and spreads in different ways and is treated differently. Treatment also depends on the stage, or how advanced it is. Treatment may include chemotherapy, radiation and surgery. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
66885
Concept ID:
C0242379
Neoplastic Process
2.

Lung cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. and worldwide. The 2 major forms of lung cancer are nonsmall cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer (see 182280), which account for 85% and 15% of all lung cancers, respectively. Nonsmall cell lung cancer can be divided into 3 major histologic subtypes: squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell lung cancer. Cigarette smoking causes all types of lung cancer, but it is most strongly linked with small cell lung cancer and squamous cell carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma is the most common type in patients who have never smoked. Nonsmall cell lung cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and has a poor prognosis (summary by Herbst et al., 2008). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
195765
Concept ID:
C0684249
Neoplastic Process
3.

Small cell cancer of the lung

A form of highly malignant lung cancer that is composed of small ovoid cells (SMALL CELL CARCINOMA). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
57450
Concept ID:
C0149925
Neoplastic Process
4.

Non-small cell lung cancer

A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
40104
Concept ID:
C0007131
Neoplastic Process
5.

Ibuprofen

A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent with analgesic properties used in the therapy of rheumatism and arthritis. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
9394
Concept ID:
C0020740
Pharmacologic Substance
6.

Female

A person who belongs to the sex that normally produces ova. The term is used to indicate biological sex distinctions, or cultural gender role distinctions, or both. (NCI) [from NCI_CDISC]

MedGen UID:
8807
Concept ID:
C0015780
Finding
7.

Diagnosis

The process of identifying a disease, such as cancer, from its signs and symptoms. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
8354
Concept ID:
C0011900
Finding
8.

Yes

MedGen UID:
720794
Concept ID:
C1298907
Finding
9.

Multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 2

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) is classified into three subtypes: MEN 2A, FMTC (familial medullary thyroid carcinoma), and MEN 2B. All three subtypes involve high risk for development of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC); MEN 2A and MEN 2B have an increased risk for pheochromocytoma; MEN 2A has an increased risk for parathyroid adenoma or hyperplasia. Additional features in MEN 2B include mucosal neuromas of the lips and tongue, distinctive facies with enlarged lips, ganglioneuromatosis of the gastrointestinal tract, and an asthenic ‘marfanoid’ body habitus. MTC typically occurs in early childhood in MEN 2B, early adulthood in MEN 2A, and middle age in FMTC. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
441301
Concept ID:
CN073359
Disease or Syndrome
10.

History of previous events

The aggregate of past events; the continuum of events occurring in succession leading from the past to the present; a record or narrative description of past events. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
389153
Concept ID:
C2004062
Finding
11.

Cancer Progression

A pathologic process in which alterations at the molecular level result in a more aggressive cytologic and phenotypic profile and clinical course of a malignant neoplasm. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
364930
Concept ID:
C1947901
Neoplastic Process
12.

Ovarian cancer

The ovaries are part of the female reproductive system. They produce a woman's eggs and female hormones. Each ovary is about the size and shape of an almond. Cancer of the ovary is not common, but it causes more deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian cancer may have no symptoms or just mild symptoms until the disease is in an advanced stage. Then it is hard to treat. Symptoms may include: -A heavy feeling in the pelvis. -Pain in the lower abdomen. - Bleeding from the vagina. - Weight gain or loss. - Abnormal periods. - Unexplained back pain that gets worse. - Gas, nausea, vomiting, or loss of appetite. To diagnose ovarian cancer, doctors do one or more tests. They include a physical exam, a pelvic exam, lab tests, ultrasound, or a biopsy. Treatment is usually surgery followed by chemotherapy. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
216027
Concept ID:
C1140680
Neoplastic Process
13.

Disease regression

Return to a former state; a subsidence of the symptoms of a disease process; in cancer, a decrease in the size of a tumor or in the extent of cancer in the body. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
195771
Concept ID:
C0684320
Pathologic Function
14.

Neoplasm of ovary

Ovarian cancer, the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy, is characterized by advanced presentation with loco-regional dissemination in the peritoneal cavity and the rare incidence of visceral metastases (Chi et al., 2001). These typical features relate to the biology of the disease, which is a principal determinant of outcome (Auersperg et al., 2001). Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most common form and encompasses 5 major histologic subtypes: papillary serous, endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell, and transitional cell. Epithelial ovarian cancer arises as a result of genetic alterations sustained by the ovarian surface epithelium (Stany et al., 2008; Soslow, 2008). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
181539
Concept ID:
C0919267
Neoplastic Process
15.

History of

A collection of information about a person's health. It may include information about allergies, illnesses and surgeries, and dates and results of physical exams, tests, screenings, and immunizations. It may also include information about medicines taken and about diet and exercise. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
82657
Concept ID:
C0262926
Finding
16.

Neoplasm Metastasis

The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another. A tumor formed by cells that have spread is called a "metastatic tumor" or a "metastasis." The metastatic tumor contains cells that are like those in the original (primary) tumor. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
45032
Concept ID:
C0027627
Neoplastic Process
17.

Disease Attributes

Clinical characteristics of disease or illness. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
199876
Concept ID:
C0752357
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Rufen

MedGen UID:
195842
Concept ID:
C0699206
Pharmacologic Substance
19.

Salprofen

MedGen UID:
154668
Concept ID:
C0600248
Pharmacologic Substance
20.

IP-82

MedGen UID:
152253
Concept ID:
C0700982
Pharmacologic Substance

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