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Items: 19

1.

Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy

A group of inherited disorders characterized by degeneration of dorsal root and autonomic ganglion cells, and clinically by loss of sensation and autonomic dysfunction. There are five subtypes. Type I features autosomal dominant inheritance and distal sensory involvement. Type II is characterized by autosomal inheritance and distal and proximal sensory loss. Type III is DYSAUTONOMIA, FAMILIAL. Type IV features insensitivity to pain, heat intolerance, and mental deficiency. Type V is characterized by a selective loss of pain with intact light touch and vibratory sensation. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1995, Ch51, pp142-4) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
14355
Concept ID:
C0027889
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Familial dysautonomia

Familial dysautonomia (FD) affects the development and survival of sensory, sympathetic, and parasympathetic neurons. It is a debilitating disease present from birth. Neuronal degeneration progresses throughout life. Affected individuals have gastrointestinal dysfunction, vomiting crises, recurrent pneumonia, altered sensitivity to pain and temperature perception, and cardiovascular instability. About 40% of individuals have autonomic crises. Hypotonia contributes to delay in acquisition of motor milestones. Older individuals often have a broad-based and ataxic gait that deteriorates over time. Life expectancy is decreased. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
41678
Concept ID:
C0013364
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
3.

Gastroesophageal reflux disease

Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is characterized by the retrograde movement of stomach contents into the esophagus. In its most severe form, GER results in extensive tissue damage caused by acid reflux. In adolescents and adults, and even infrequently in children, chronic GER is associated with the risk of developing Barrett metaplasia (614266), a premalignant lesion of the esophageal mucosa (Hu et al., 2000). In turn, Barrett metaplasia is correlated with the development of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus (see 614266), estimated as the fifth most prevalent neoplasia in the Western world (Lagergren et al., 1999). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
6553
Concept ID:
C0017168
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Pain

MedGen UID:
776584
Concept ID:
C2364139
Finding
5.

Dysautonomia

Dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505243
Concept ID:
CN002233
Finding
6.

Gastroesophageal reflux

A condition in which the stomach contents leak backwards from the stomach into the esophagus through the lower esophageal sphincter. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505057
Concept ID:
CN001828
Finding
7.

Mode of inheritance

The pattern in which a particular genetic trait or disorder is passed from one generation to the next. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504300
Concept ID:
CN000006
Finding
8.

Multiple fibrofolliculomas

The clinical characteristics of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) include cutaneous manifestations (fibrofolliculomas, trichodiscomas/angiofibromas, perifollicular fibromas, and acrochordons), pulmonary cysts/history of pneumothorax, and various types of renal tumors. Disease severity can vary significantly even within the same family. Skin lesions typically appear during the third and fourth decades of life and typically increase in size and number with age. Lung cysts are mostly bilateral and multifocal; most individuals are asymptomatic but at high risk for spontaneous pneumothorax. Individuals with BHDS are at a sevenfold increased risk for renal tumors that are typically bilateral and multifocal and usually slow growing; median age of tumor diagnosis is 48 years. The most common renal tumors are a hybrid of oncocytoma and chromophobe histologic cell types (so-called oncocytic hybrid tumor) and chromophobe histologic cell types. Some families have renal tumor and/or autosomal dominant spontaneous pneumothorax without cutaneous manifestations. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
91070
Concept ID:
C0346010
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II

Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II (HSAN2) is characterized by progressively reduced sensation to pain, temperature, and touch. Onset can be at birth and is often before puberty. The sensory deficit is predominantly distal with the lower limbs more severely affected than the upper limbs. Over time sensory function becomes severely reduced. Unnoticed injuries and neuropathic skin promote ulcerations and infections that result in spontaneous amputation of digits or the need for surgical amputation. Osteomyelitis is common. Painless fractures can complicate the disease. Autonomic disturbances are variable and can include hyperhidrosis, tonic pupils, and urinary incontinence in those with more advanced disease. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
42513
Concept ID:
C0020072
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Hereditary insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis

Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA), also known as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV (HSAN IV), is characterized by insensitivity to pain, anhidrosis (the inability to sweat), and intellectual disability. The ability to sense all pain (including visceral pain) is absent, resulting in repeated injuries including: oral self-mutilation (biting of tongue, lips, and buccal mucosa); biting of fingertips; bruising, scarring, and infection of the skin; multiple bone fractures (many of which fail to heal properly); and recurrent joint dislocations resulting in joint deformity. Sense of touch, vibration, and position are normal. Anhidrosis predisposes to recurrent febrile episodes that are often the initial manifestation of CIPA. Hypothermia in cold environments also occurs. Intellectual disability of varying degree is observed in most affected individuals; hyperactivity and emotional lability are common. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
6915
Concept ID:
C0020074
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Hyperhidrosis

Excessive sweating. In the localized type, the most frequent sites are the palms, soles, axillae, inguinal folds, and the perineal area. Its chief cause is thought to be emotional. Generalized hyperhidrosis may be induced by a hot, humid environment, by fever, or by vigorous exercise. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
5690
Concept ID:
C0020458
Finding
12.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Neuromuscular Diseases

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. Your nerve cells, also called neurons, send the messages that control these muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between your nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, your muscles weaken and waste away. The weakness can lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include. -Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. -Multiple sclerosis. -Myasthenia gravis. -Spinal muscular atrophy. Many neuromuscular diseases are genetic, which means they run in families or there is a mutation in your genes. Sometimes, an immune system disorder can cause them. Most of them have no cure. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms, increase mobility and lengthen life.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10323
Concept ID:
C0027868
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Autoimmune disease

Your body's immune system protects you from disease and infection. But if you have an autoimmune disease, your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Autoimmune diseases can affect many parts of the body. No one is sure what causes autoimmune diseases. They do tend to run in families. Women - particularly African-American, Hispanic-American, and Native-American women - have a higher risk for some autoimmune diseases. There are more than 80 types of autoimmune diseases, and some have similar symptoms. This makes it hard for your health care provider to know if you really have one of these diseases, and if so, which one. Getting a diagnosis can be frustrating and stressful. Often, the first symptoms are fatigue, muscle aches and a low fever. The classic sign of an autoimmune disease is inflammation, which can cause redness, heat, pain and swelling. The diseases may also have flare-ups, when they get worse, and remissions, when symptoms get better or disappear. Treatment depends on the disease, but in most cases one important goal is to reduce inflammation. Sometimes doctors prescribe corticosteroids or other drugs that reduce your immune response.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2135
Concept ID:
C0004364
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IIA

Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II (HSAN2) is characterized by progressively reduced sensation to pain, temperature, and touch. Onset can be at birth and is often before puberty. The sensory deficit is predominantly distal with the lower limbs more severely affected than the upper limbs. Over time sensory function becomes severely reduced. Unnoticed injuries and neuropathic skin promote ulcerations and infections that result in spontaneous amputation of digits or the need for surgical amputation. Osteomyelitis is common. Painless fractures can complicate the disease. Autonomic disturbances are variable and can include hyperhidrosis, tonic pupils, and urinary incontinence in those with more advanced disease. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
416701
Concept ID:
C2752089
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Congenital sensory neuropathy with selective loss of small myelinated fibers

Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V (HSAN5) is a condition that primarily affects the sensory nerve cells (sensory neurons), which transmit information about sensations such as pain, temperature, and touch. These sensations are impaired in people with HSAN5. The signs and symptoms of HSAN5 appear early, usually at birth or during infancy. People with HSAN5 lose the ability to feel pain, heat, and cold. Deep pain perception, the feeling of pain from injuries to bones, ligaments, or muscles, is especially affected in people with HSAN5. Because of the inability to feel deep pain, affected individuals suffer repeated severe injuries such as bone fractures and joint injuries that go unnoticed. Repeated trauma can lead to a condition called Charcot joints, in which the bones and tissue surrounding joints are destroyed. [from GHR]

MedGen UID:
6916
Concept ID:
C0020075
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Neuropathy hereditary sensory and autonomic type 1

Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA (HSN1A) is an axonal form of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy distinguished by prominent early sensory loss and later positive sensory phenomena including dysesthesia and characteristic "lightning" or "shooting" pains. Loss of sensation can lead to painless injuries, which, if unrecognized, result in slow wound healing and subsequent osteomyelitis requiring distal amputations. HSN1A is often associated with progressive sensorineural deafness. Motor involvement is present in all advanced cases and can be severe. After age 20 years, the distal wasting and weakness may involve proximal muscles so that a person in his/her 60s or 70s may require a wheelchair for mobility. Drenching sweating of the hands and feet is sometimes reported and occasionally pupillary abnormalities are observed; however, visceral signs of autonomic involvement are rare. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
5645
Concept ID:
C0020071
Disease or Syndrome
18.

NEUROPATHY, HEREDITARY SENSORY, TYPE IF

Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IF is an autosomal dominant sensory neuropathy affecting the lower limbs. Distal sensory impairment becomes apparent during the second or third decade of life, resulting in painless ulceration of the feet with poor healing, which can progress to osteomyelitis, bone destruction, and amputation. There is no autonomic involvement, spasticity, or cognitive impairment (summary by Kornak et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HSN, see HSAN1A (162400). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
816524
Concept ID:
C3810194
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Pain insensitivity

Inability to perceive painful stimuli. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
429077
Concept ID:
CN006129
Finding
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