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Items: 10

1.

Thyroid cancer, follicular

Nonmedullary thyroid cancer (NMTC) comprises thyroid cancers of follicular cell origin and accounts for more than 95% of all thyroid cancer cases. The remaining cancers originate from parafollicular cells (medullary thyroid cancer, MTC; 155240). NMTC is classified into 4 groups: papillary, follicular, Hurthle cell (607464), and anaplastic. Approximately 5% of NMTC is hereditary, occurring as a minor component of a familial cancer syndrome (e.g., familial adenomatous polyposis, 175100, Carney complex, 160980) or as a primary feature (familial NMTC or FNMTC). Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is the most common histologic subtype of FNMTC, accounting for approximately 85% of cases (summary by Vriens et al., 2009). Follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) accounts for approximately 15% of NMTC and is defined by invasive features that result in infiltration of blood vessels and/or full penetration of the tumor capsule, in the absence of the nuclear alterations that characterize papillary carcinoma. FTC is rarely multifocal and usually does not metastasize to the regional lymph nodes but tends to spread via the bloodstream to the lung and bones. An important histologic variant of FTC is the oncocytic (Hurthle cell, oxyphilic) follicular carcinoma composed of eosinophilic cells replete with mitochondria (summary by Bonora et al., 2010). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of NMTC, see NMTC1 (188550). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
64630
Concept ID:
C0206682
Neoplastic Process
2.

Renal cell carcinoma

A type of carcinoma of the kidney with origin in the epithelium of the proximal convoluted renal tubule. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505836
Concept ID:
CN004944
Finding
3.

Zonular cataract

Zonular cataracts are defined to be cataracts that affect specific regions of the lens. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
350517
Concept ID:
C1861821
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Cerebral cavernous malformation

Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations in the brain and spinal cord comprising closely clustered, enlarged capillary channels (caverns) with a single layer of endothelium without mature vessel wall elements or normal intervening brain parenchyma. The diameter of CCMs ranges from a few millimeters to several centimeters. CCMs increase or decrease in size and increase in number over time. Hundreds of lesions may be identified, depending on the person’s age and the quality and type of brain imaging used. Although CCMs have been reported in infants and children, the majority become evident between the second and fifth decades with findings such as seizures, focal neurologic deficits, nonspecific headaches, and cerebral hemorrhage. Up to 50% of individuals with CCM remain symptom free throughout their lives. Familial cerebral cavernous malformation (FCCM) is defined as the occurrence of CCMs in at least two family members and/or the presence of multiple CCMs and/or the presence of a disease-causing mutation in one of the three genes in which mutations are known to cause familial CCM. Cutaneous vascular lesions are found in 9% of those with FCCM and retinal vascular lesions in almost 5%. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
349362
Concept ID:
C1861784
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Renal cell carcinoma, papillary, 1

Hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma is characterized by the development of multiple, bilateral papillary renal tumors (Zbar et al., 1995). The transmission pattern is consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Papillary renal cell carcinoma is histologically and genetically distinct from 2 other forms of inherited renal carcinoma, von Hippel Lindau disease (193300), caused by mutation in the VHL gene (608537) on chromosome 3, and a form associated with the chromosome translocation t(3;8), as described by Cohen et al. (1979). Bodmer et al. (2002) reviewed the molecular genetics of familial and nonfamilial cases of renal cell carcinoma, including the roles of VHL, MET, and translocations involving chromosomes 1, 3, and X. For background information and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nonpapillary renal cell carcinoma, see RCC (144700). See also a hereditary syndrome of predisposition to uterine leiomyomas and papillary renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC; 150800) caused by germline mutation in the FH gene (136850). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
766
Concept ID:
C0007134
Neoplastic Process
6.

Abnormality of the thyroid gland

Your thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland in your neck, just above your collarbone. It is one of your endocrine glands, which make hormones. Thyroid hormones control the rate of many activities in your body. These include how fast you burn calories and how fast your heart beats. All of these activities are your body's metabolism. Thyroid problems include. -Goiter - enlargement of the thyroid gland. -Hyperthyroidism - when your thyroid gland makes more thyroid hormones than your body needs. -Hypothyroidism - when your thyroid gland does not make enough thyroid hormones. -Thyroid cancer. -Thyroid nodules - lumps in the thyroid gland. -Thyroiditis - swelling of the thyroid. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
52747
Concept ID:
C0040128
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Genitourinary neoplasm

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the genitourinary system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
22583
Concept ID:
C0042065
Neoplastic Process
8.

Nephropathy

Your kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of your fists. They are located near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney about a million tiny structures called nephrons filter blood. They remove waste products and extra water, which become urine. The urine flows through tubes called ureters to your bladder, which stores the urine until you go to the bathroom. . Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove wastes. Causes can include genetic problems, injuries, or medicines. You are at greater risk for kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a close family member with kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease damages the nephrons slowly over several years. Other kidney problems include:. -Cancer. -Cysts. -Stones. -Infections. Your doctor can run tests to find out if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail completely, a kidney transplant or dialysis can replace the work your kidneys normally do. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9635
Concept ID:
C0022658
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Disorder of endocrine system

Your endocrine system includes eight major glands throughout your body. These glands make hormones. Hormones are chemical messengers. They travel through your bloodstream to tissues or organs. Hormones work slowly and affect body processes from head to toe. These include. -Growth and development. -Metabolism - digestion, elimination, breathing, blood circulation and maintaining body temperature . -Sexual function. -Reproduction. -Mood. If your hormone levels are too high or too low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Stress, infection and changes in your blood's fluid and electrolyte balance can also influence hormone levels. In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are usually treated by controlling how much hormone your body makes. Hormone supplements can help if the problem is too little of a hormone.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4043
Concept ID:
C0014130
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Adenocarcinoma

A malignant neoplasm arising from glandular cells. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
122
Concept ID:
C0001418
Neoplastic Process
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