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Results: 1 to 20 of 41

1.

Alstrom syndrome

Alström syndrome is characterized by cone-rod dystrophy, obesity, progressive sensorineural hearing impairment, dilated or restrictive cardiomyopathy, the insulin resistance syndrome, and multiple organ failure. Wide clinical variability is observed among affected individuals, even within the same family. Cone-rod dystrophy presents as progressive visual impairment, photophobia, and nystagmus usually starting between birth and age 15 months. Many individuals lose all perception of light by the end of the second decade, but a minority retain the ability to read large print into the third decade. Children usually have normal birth weight but develop truncal obesity during their first year. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss presents in the first decade in as many as 70% of individuals. Hearing loss may progress to the severe or moderately severe range (40-70 db) by the end of the first to second decade. Insulin resistance is typically accompanied by the skin changes of acanthosis nigricans, and proceeds to type 2 diabetes in the majority by the third decade. Nearly all demonstrate associated dyslipidemia. Other endocrine abnormalities can include hypothyroidism, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in boys, and polycystic ovaries in girls. More than 60% of individuals with Alström syndrome develop cardiac failure as a result of dilated or restrictive cardiomyopathy. About 50% of individuals have delay in early developmental milestones; intelligence is normal. Liver involvement includes elevation of transaminases, steatosis, hepatosplenomegaly, and steatohepatitis. Portal hypertension and cirrhosis can lead to hepatic encephalopathy and life-threatening esophageal varices. Pulmonary dysfunction and severe renal disease may also develop. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) can occur as early as the late teens. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
78675
Concept ID:
C0268425
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Childhood obesity

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. Both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what's considered healthy for his or her height. Children grow at different rates, so it isn't always easy to know when a child is obese or overweight. Ask your health care provider to check whether your child's weight and height are in a healthy range. If a weight-loss program is necessary, involve the whole family in healthy habits so your child doesn't feel singled out. Encourage healthy eating by: -Serving more fruits and vegetables. -Buying fewer soft drinks and high-fat, high-calorie snack foods. -Making sure your child eats breakfast every day. -Eating fast food less often. -Not using food as a reward. Physical activity is also very important. Kids need about 60 minutes each day. It does not have to happen all at once. Several short periods of activity during the day are just as good. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
771133
Concept ID:
C3645710
Disease or Syndrome
4.

hearing impairment

A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
235586
Concept ID:
C1384666
Finding
5.

Degeneration of retina

A retrogressive pathological change in the retina, focal or generalized, caused by genetic defects, inflammation, trauma, vascular disease, or aging. Degeneration affecting predominantly the macula lutea of the retina is MACULAR DEGENERATION. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p304) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
48432
Concept ID:
C0035304
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Obesity

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. The weight may come from muscle, bone, fat, and/or body water. Both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what's considered healthy for his or her height. . Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories than you use. The balance between calories-in and calories-out differs for each person. Factors that might affect your weight include your genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods, and not being physically active. . Being obese increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and some cancers. If you are obese, losing even 5 to 10 percent of your weight can delay or prevent some of these diseases. For example, that means losing 10 to 20 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
18127
Concept ID:
C0028754
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Diabetes mellitus

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes. A blood test can show if you have diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your glucose level and take medicine if prescribed. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8350
Concept ID:
C0011849
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Fibrosis

The formation of fibrous tissue; fibroid or fibrous degeneration. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
5179
Concept ID:
C0016059
Pathologic Function
9.

Childhood

From 2 to 11 years of life. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
832642
Concept ID:
CN227394
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
806069

11.

Dilated cardiomyopathy

Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is defined by the presence of left ventricular dilatation and left ventricular systolic dysfunction in the absence of abnormal loading conditions (hypertension, valve disease) or coronary artery disease sufficient to cause global systolic impairment. Right ventricular dilation and dysfunction may be present but are not necessary for the diagnosis. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504887
Concept ID:
CN001497
Finding
12.

Cardiomyopathy

A myocardial disorder in which the heart muscle is structurally and functionally abnormal, in the absence of coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular disease and congenital heart disease sufficient to cause the observed myocardial abnormality. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504883
Concept ID:
CN001491
Finding
13.

Diabetes mellitus

A group of abnormalities characterized by hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504609
Concept ID:
CN000766
Finding
14.

Retinal degeneration

A deterioration of the retina. This nonspecific term is retained here because of its wide use in the literature, but if possible new annotations should indicate the precise type of retinal abnormality. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504488
Concept ID:
CN000512
Finding
15.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
449670

16.

Hearing impairment

A decreased magnitude of the sensory perception of sound. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
446352
Concept ID:
CN000341
Finding
17.

Renal insufficiency

A reduction in the level of performance of the kidneys in areas of function comprising the concentration of urine, removal of wastes, the maintenance of electrolyte balance, homeostasis of blood pressure, and calcium metabolism. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
427392
Concept ID:
CN000083
Finding
18.

Mild

The second level of severity in an ordered list based on a five-level scale of minimal, mild, moderate, marked, and severe. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
422477
Concept ID:
C2945599
19.

Obesity

MedGen UID:
368429
Concept ID:
C1963185
Finding
20.

Dilated cardiomyopathy 1A

LMNA-related dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is caused by mutations in LMNA and is characterized by left ventricular enlargement and reduced systolic function preceded or accompanied by significant conduction system disease and/or arrhythmias. LMNA-related DCM usually presents in early to mid-adulthood with symptomatic conduction system disease or arrhythmias, or with symptomatic DCM including heart failure or embolus from a left ventricular mural thrombus. Sudden cardiac death can occur, and in some instances is the presenting manifestation; sudden cardiac death may occur with little systolic dysfunction. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
258500
Concept ID:
C1449563
Disease or Syndrome

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