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Results: 1 to 20 of 42

1.

Autoimmune state

Process whereby the immune system reacts against the body's own tissues. Autoimmunity may produce or be caused by AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
2136
Concept ID:
C0004368
Pathologic Function
2.

Autoimmunity

The occurrence of an immune reaction against the organism's own cells or tissues. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505423
Concept ID:
CN002679
Finding
3.

P-2

MedGen UID:
114772
Concept ID:
C0608663
Pharmacologic Substance
4.

Microscopic polyarteritis nodosa

A primary systemic vasculitis of small- and some medium-sized vessels. It is characterized by a tropism for kidneys and lungs, positive association with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), and a paucity of immunoglobulin deposits in vessel walls. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
83359
Concept ID:
C0343192
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Graves' disease

Graves disease is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies to the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR; 603372) result in constitutive activation of the receptor and increased levels of thyroid hormone. Wilkin (1990) reviewed endocrine disorders of hormone excess and hormone deficiency resulting from receptor autoimmunity. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
6677
Concept ID:
C0018213
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Graves disease

An autoimmune disease where the thyroid is overactive, producing an excessive amount of thyroid hormones (a serious metabolic imbalance known as hyperthyroidism and thyrotoxicosis). This is caused by autoantibodies to the TSH-receptor (TSHR-Ab) that activate that TSH-receptor (TSHR), thereby stimulating thyroid hormone synthesis and secretion, and thyroid growth (causing a diffusely enlarged goiter). The resulting state of hyperthyroidism can cause a dramatic constellation of neuropsychological and physical signs and symptoms, which can severely compromise the patients. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
830708
Concept ID:
CN117539
Finding
7.

Independent

MedGen UID:
721426
Concept ID:
C1299583
Finding
8.

Granulomatosis

Formation of multiple granulomas, i.e., localized nodular foci inflammation. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505422
Concept ID:
CN002674
Finding
9.

Systemic lupus erythematosus

A chronic, relapsing, inflammatory, and often febrile multisystemic disorder of connective tissue, characterized principally by involvement of the skin, joints, kidneys, and serosal membranes. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505336
Concept ID:
CN002475
Finding
10.

Granulomatosis, NOS

A general term that refers to non-neoplastic and neoplastic disorders characterized by the presence of granulomas in various anatomic sites. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
488910
Concept ID:
C0521173
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Addison's disease

Autoimmune Addison disease affects the function of the adrenal glands, which are small hormone-producing glands located on top of each kidney. It is classified as an autoimmune disorder because it results from a malfunctioning immune system that attacks the adrenal glands. As a result, the production of several hormones is disrupted, which affects many body systems. The signs and symptoms of autoimmune Addison disease can begin at any time, although they most commonly begin between ages 30 and 50. Common features of this condition include extreme tiredness (fatigue), nausea, decreased appetite, and weight loss. In addition, many affected individuals have low blood pressure (hypotension), which can lead to dizziness when standing up quickly; muscle cramps; and a craving for salty foods. A characteristic feature of autoimmune Addison disease is abnormally dark areas of skin (hyperpigmentation), especially in regions that experience a lot of friction, such as the armpits, elbows, knuckles, and palm creases. The lips and the inside lining of the mouth can also be unusually dark. Because of an imbalance of hormones involved in development of sexual characteristics, women with this condition may lose their underarm and pubic hair. Other signs and symptoms of autoimmune Addison disease include low levels of sugar (hypoglycemia) and sodium (hyponatremia) and high levels of potassium (hyperkalemia) in the blood. Affected individuals may also have a shortage of red blood cells (anemia) and an increase in the number of white blood cells (lymphocytosis), particularly those known as eosinophils (eosinophilia). Autoimmune Addison disease can lead to a life-threatening adrenal crisis, characterized by vomiting, abdominal pain, back or leg cramps, and severe hypotension leading to shock. The adrenal crisis is often triggered by a stressor, such as surgery, trauma, or infection. Individuals with autoimmune Addison disease or their family members often have another autoimmune disorder, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease or type 1 diabetes.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
357032
Concept ID:
C1868690
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Primary adrenal insufficiency

MedGen UID:
337538
Concept ID:
C1846222
Finding
13.

Source

Where something is available or from where it originates. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
99076
Concept ID:
C0449416
Finding
14.

Lupus erythematosus

If you have lupus, your immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues by mistake. This can damage your joints, skin, blood vessels and organs. There are many kinds of lupus. The most common type, systemic lupus erythematosus, affects many parts of the body. Discoid lupus causes a rash that doesn't go away. Subacute cutaneous lupus causes sores after being out in the sun. Another type can be caused by medication. Neonatal lupus, which is rare, affects newborns. . Anyone can get lupus, but women are most at risk. Lupus is also more common in African American, Hispanic, Asian and Native American women. The cause of lupus is not known. . Lupus has many symptoms. Some common ones are : -Joint pain or swelling . -Muscle pain . -Fever with no known cause . -Fatigue. -Red rashes, often on the face (also called the butterfly rash). There is no one test to diagnose lupus, and it may take months or years to make the diagnosis. There is no cure for lupus, but medicines and lifestyle changes can help control it. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
98043
Concept ID:
C0409974
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Wegener's granulomatosis

Wegener granulomatosis (WG) is a systemic disease with a complex genetic background. It is characterized by necrotizing granulomatous inflammation of the upper and lower respiratory tract, glomerulonephritis, vasculitis, and the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmatic autoantibodies (ANCAs) in patient sera. These ANCAs are antibodies to a defined target antigen, proteinase-3 (PR3, PRTN3; 177020), that is present within primary azurophil granules of neutrophils (PMNs) and lysozymes of monocytes. On cytokine priming of PMNs, PR3 translocates to the cell surface, where PR3-ANCAs can interact with their antigens and activate PMNs. PMNs from patients with active WG express PR3 on their surface, produce respiratory burst, and release proteolytic enzymes after activation with PR3-ANCAs. The consequence is a self-sustaining inflammatory process (Jagiello et al., 2004). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
12144
Concept ID:
C0043092
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Systemic lupus erythematosus

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by production of autoantibodies against nuclear, cytoplasmic, and cell surface molecules that transcend organ-specific boundaries. Tissue deposition of antibodies or immune complexes induces inflammation and subsequent injury of multiple organs and finally results in clinical manifestations of SLE, including glomerulonephritis, dermatitis, thrombosis, vasculitis, seizures, and arthritis. Evidence strongly suggests the involvement of genetic components in SLE susceptibility (summary by Oishi et al., 2008). Genetic Heterogeneity of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus An autosomal recessive form of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLEB16; 614420) is caused by mutation in the DNASE1L3 gene (602244) on chromosome 3p14.3. See MAPPING and MOLECULAR GENETICS sections for a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of susceptibility to SLE. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
6146
Concept ID:
C0024141
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Addison Disease

Your adrenal glands are just above your kidneys. The outside layer of these glands makes hormones that help your body respond to stress and regulate your blood pressure and water and salt balance. Addison disease happens if the adrenal glands don't make enough of these hormones. A problem with your immune system usually causes Addison disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks your own tissues, damaging your adrenal glands. Other causes include infections and cancer. Symptoms include. -Weight loss . -Muscle weakness . -Fatigue that gets worse over time . -Low blood pressure . -Patchy or dark skin . Lab tests can confirm that you have Addison disease. If you don't treat it, it can be fatal. You will need to take hormone pills for the rest of your life. If you have Addison disease, you should carry an emergency ID. It should say that you have the disease, list your medicines and say how much you need in an emergency. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1324
Concept ID:
C0001403
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Granulomatosis with polyangiitis

A multisystemic disease of a complex genetic background. It is characterized by inflammation of the blood vessels (VASCULITIS) leading to damage in any number of organs. The common features include granulomatous inflammation of the RESPIRATORY TRACT and KIDNEYS. Most patients have measurable autoantibodies (ANTINEUTROPHIL CYTOPLASMIC ANTIBODIES) against MYELOBLASTIN. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
811223
Concept ID:
C3495801
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis

Group of systemic vasculitis with a strong association with ANCA. The disorders are characterized by necrotizing inflammation of small and medium size vessels, with little or no immune-complex deposits in vessel walls. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
403453
Concept ID:
C2717865
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Disease Attributes

Clinical characteristics of disease or illness. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
199876
Concept ID:
C0752357
Disease or Syndrome

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