Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 9

1.

Crohn disease

A chronic granulomatous inflammatory disease of the intestines that may affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract from mouth to anus, causing a wide variety of symptoms. It primarily causes abdominal pain, diarrhea which may be bloody, vomiting, or weight loss, but may also cause complications outside of the gastrointestinal tract such as skin rashes, arthritis, inflammation of the eye, tiredness, and lack of concentration. Crohn's disease is thought to be an autoimmune disease, in which the body's immune system attacks the gastrointestinal tract, causing inflammation. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506462
Concept ID:
CN117176
Finding
2.

Crohn disease

Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. Crohn's can affect any area from the mouth to the anus. It often affects the lower part of the small intestine called the ileum. The cause of Crohn's disease is unknown. It may be due to an abnormal reaction by the body's immune system. It also seems to run in some families. It most commonly starts between the ages of 13 and 30. The most common symptoms are pain in the abdomen and diarrhea. Other symptoms include. -Bleeding from the rectum. -Weight loss. -Fever. Your doctor will diagnose Crohn's disease with a physical exam, lab tests, imaging tests, and a colonoscopy. Crohn's can cause complications, such as intestinal blockages, ulcers in the intestine, and problems getting enough nutrients. People with Crohn's can also have joint pain and skin problems. Children with the disease may have growth problems. There is no cure for Crohn's. Treatment can help control symptoms, and may include medicines, nutrition supplements, and/or surgery. Some people have long periods of remission, when they are free of symptoms. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3664
Concept ID:
C0010346
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Mannose-binding protein deficiency

Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) deficiency, defined as MBL protein level of less than 100 ng/ml, is present in about 5% of people of European descent and in about 10% of sub-Saharan Africans. Most MBL-deficient adults appear healthy, but low levels of MBL are associated with increased risk of infection in toddlers, in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, and in organ-transplant patients receiving immunosuppressive drugs, particularly recipients of liver transplants (review by Degn et al., 2011). MBL is a soluble molecule that can activate the lectin pathway of the complement system; deficiency may thus lead to defects in the complement system (summary by Garcia-Laorden et al., 2008). Genetic Heterogeneity of Lectin Complement Activation Pathway Defects See also LCAPD2 (613791), caused by variation in the MASP2 gene (605102) on chromosome 1p36, and LCAPD3 (613860), caused by variation in the FCN3 gene (604973) on chromosome 1p36. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
320532
Concept ID:
C1835140
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Inflammatory bowel disease 1

A condition in which the gastrointestinal tract is inflamed over a long period of time. Regional enteritis usually affects the small intestine and colon. Symptoms include fever, diarrhea, stomach cramps, vomiting, and weight loss. Regional enteritis increases the risk of colorectal cancer and small intestine cancer. It is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
146259
Concept ID:
C0678202
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Inflammatory bowel disease

A spectrum of small and large bowel inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. It includes Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and colitis of indeterminate type. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
43877
Concept ID:
C0021390
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Disorder of intestine

An abnormality of the intestine. The closely related term enteropathy is used to refer to any disease of the intestine. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7130
Concept ID:
C0021831
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Disorder of digestive system

When you eat, your body breaks food down to a form it can use to build and nourish cells and provide energy. This process is called digestion. . Your digestive system is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube. It runs from your mouth to your anus and includes your esophagus, stomach, and small and large intestines. Your liver, gallbladder and pancreas are also involved. They produce juices to help digestion. . There are many types of digestive disorders. The symptoms vary widely depending on the problem. In general, you should see your doctor if you have . -Blood in your stool. -Changes in bowel habits. -Severe abdominal pain. -Unintentional weight loss. -Heartburn not relieved by antacids. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3828
Concept ID:
C0012242
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Inflammatory bowel disease 13

MedGen UID:
394202
Concept ID:
C2677101
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Inflammatory bowel disease 24

MedGen UID:
393404
Concept ID:
C2675509
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...