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Results: 9

1.

Adult

From 19 to 65 years of life. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
832807
Concept ID:
CN227396
Disease or Syndrome
2.

MODY

MODY (maturity-onset diabetes of the young) is a rare, familial, clinically and genetically heterogeneous form of diabetes characterized by young age of onset (generally 10-45 years of age) with maintenance of endogenous insulin production, lack of pancreatic beta-cell autoimmunity, absence of obesity and insulin resistance and extra-pancreatic manifestations in some subtypes. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
830908
Concept ID:
CN205286
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Maturity-onset diabetes of the young

The term Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) was initially used for patients diagnosed with fasting hyperglycemia that could be treated without insulin for more than two years, where the initial diagnosis was made at a young age (under 25 years). Thus, MODY combines characteristics of type 1 diabetes (young age at diagnosis) and type 2 diabetes (less insulin dependence than type 1 diabetes). The term MODY is now most often used to refer to a group of monogenic diseases with these characteristics. Here, the term is used to describe hyperglycemia diagnosed at a young age with no or minor insulin dependency, no evidence of insulin resistence, and lack of evidence of autoimmune destruction of the beta cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
428119
Concept ID:
CN004347
Finding
4.

Maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 1

MedGen UID:
377589
Concept ID:
C1852093
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Maturity onset diabetes mellitus in young

Maturity-onset diabetes of the young is an autosomal dominant form of diabetes typically occurring before 25 years of age and caused by primary insulin secretion defects. Despite its low prevalence, MODY is not a single entity but represents genetic, metabolic, and clinical heterogeneity (Vaxillaire and Froguel, 2008). Genetic Heterogeneity of MODY MODY1 (125850) is determined by heterozygous mutation in the hepatocyte nuclear factor-4-alpha gene (HNF4A; 600281) on chromosome 20. MODY2 (125851) is caused by heterozygous mutation in the glucokinase gene (GCK; 138079) on chromosome 7. MODY3 (600496) is caused by heterozygous mutation in the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha gene (HNF1A; 142410) on chromosome 12q24.2. MODY4 (606392) is caused by heterozygous mutation in the pancreas/duodenum homeobox protein-1 gene (PDX1; 600733) on chromosome 13q12.1. MODY5 (137920) is caused by heterozygous mutation in the gene encoding hepatic transcription factor-2 (TCF2; 189907) on chromosome 17cen-q21.3. MODY6 (606394) is caused by heterozygous mutation in the NEUROD1 gene (601724) on chromosome 2q32. MODY7 (610508) is caused by heterozygous mutation in the KLF11 gene (603301) on chromosome 2p25. MODY8 (609812), or diabetes-pancreatic exocrine dysfunction syndrome, is caused by heterozygous mutation in the CEL gene (114840) on chromosome 9q34. MODY9 (612225) is caused by heterozygous mutation in the PAX4 gene (167413) on chromosome 7q32. MODY10 (613370) is caused by heterozygous mutation in the insulin gene (INS; 176730) on chromosome 11p15.5. MODY11 (613375) is caused by heterozygous mutation in the BLK gene (191305) on chromosome 8p23. MODY13 (616329) is caused by heterozygous mutation in the KCNJ11 gene (600937) on chromosome 11p15. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
87433
Concept ID:
C0342276
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Diabetes mellitus type 2

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Having prediabetes also increases your risk. Prediabetes means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly. Some people do not notice symptoms at all. The symptoms can include. -Being very thirsty. -Urinating often. -Feeling very hungry or tired. -Losing weight without trying. -Having sores that heal slowly. -Having blurry eyesight. A blood test can show if you have diabetes. Many people can manage their diabetes through healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing. Some people also need to take diabetes medicines. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
41523
Concept ID:
C0011860
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Pregnancy

So you're going to have a baby! Whether you are pregnant or are planning to get pregnant, you will want to give your baby a healthy start. You need to have regular visits with your healthcare provider. These prenatal care visits are very important for your baby and yourself. Some things you might do when you are pregnant could hurt your baby, such as smoking or drinking. Some medicines can also be a problem, even ones that a doctor prescribed. You will need to drink plenty of fluids and eat a healthy diet. You may also be tired and need more rest. Your body will change as your baby grows during the nine months of your pregnancy. Don't hesitate to call your health care provider if you think you have a problem or something is bothering or worrying you. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10895
Concept ID:
C0032961
8.

Maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 7

MedGen UID:
351232
Concept ID:
C1864839
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 4

MedGen UID:
318863
Concept ID:
C1833382
Disease or Syndrome

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