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Items: 16

1.

Nemaline myopathy

Nemaline myopathy (referred to in this entry as NM) is characterized by weakness, hypotonia, and depressed or absent deep tendon reflexes. Muscle weakness is usually most severe in the face, the neck flexors, and the proximal limb muscles. The clinical classification defines six forms of NM, which are classified by onset and severity of motor and respiratory involvement: Severe congenital (neonatal) (16% of all individuals with NM). Amish NM. Intermediate congenital (20%). Typical congenital (46%). Childhood-onset (13%). Adult-onset (late-onset) (4%). Considerable overlap occurs among the forms. There are significant differences in survival between individuals classified as having severe, intermediate, and typical congenital NM. Severe neonatal respiratory disease and the presence of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita are associated with death in the first year of life. Independent ambulation before age 18 months is predictive of survival. Most children with typical congenital NM are eventually able to walk. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
61528
Concept ID:
C0206157
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Nemaline myopathy

MedGen UID:
880235
Concept ID:
CN235631
Finding
3.

Myopathy

A disorder of muscle unrelated to impairment of innervation or neuromuscular junction. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505479
Concept ID:
CN002886
Finding
4.

Autosomal recessive centronuclear myopathy

Centronuclear myopathy is a condition characterized by muscle weakness (myopathy) and wasting (atrophy) in the skeletal muscles, which are the muscles used for movement. The severity of centronuclear myopathy varies among affected individuals, even among members of the same family.People with centronuclear myopathy begin experiencing muscle weakness at any time from birth to early adulthood. The muscle weakness slowly worsens over time and can lead to delayed development of motor skills, such as crawling or walking; muscle pain during exercise; and difficulty walking. Some affected individuals may need wheelchair assistance as the muscles atrophy and weakness becomes more severe. In rare instances, the muscle weakness improves over time.Some people with centronuclear myopathy experience mild to severe breathing problems related to the weakness of muscles needed for breathing. People with centronuclear myopathy may have droopy eyelids (ptosis) and weakness in other facial muscles, including the muscles that control eye movement. People with this condition may also have foot abnormalities, a high arch in the roof of the mouth (high-arched palate), and abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis). Rarely, individuals with centronuclear myopathy have a weakened heart muscle (cardiomyopathy), disturbances in nerve function (neuropathy), or intellectual disability.A key feature of centronuclear myopathy is the displacement of the nucleus in muscle cells, which can be viewed under a microscope. Normally the nucleus is found at the edges of the rod-shaped muscle cells, but in people with centronuclear myopathy the nucleus is located in the center of these cells. How the change in location of the nucleus affects muscle cell function is unknown.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
98049
Concept ID:
C0410204
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
5.

Myopathy

Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even paralysis. . Causes of muscle disorders include. -Injury or overuse, such as sprains or strains, cramps or tendinitis . -A genetic disorder, such as muscular dystrophy. -Some cancers. -Inflammation, such as myositis. -Diseases of nerves that affect muscles. -Infections. -Certain medicines. Sometimes the cause is not known.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10135
Concept ID:
C0026848
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Muscle weakness

Reduced strength of muscles. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
57735
Concept ID:
C0151786
Finding; Sign or Symptom
7.

Nemaline bodies

Nemaline rods are abnormal bodies that can occur in skeletal muscle fibers. The rods can be observed on histological analysis of muscle biopsy tissue or upon electron microscopy, where they appear either as extensions of sarcomeric Z-lines, in random array without obvious attachment to Z-lines (often in areas devoid of sarcomeres) or in large clusters localized at the sarcolemma or intermyofibrillar spaces. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
814369
Concept ID:
C3808039
Finding
8.

Congenital myopathy

MedGen UID:
124381
Concept ID:
C0270960
Congenital Abnormality
9.

Neonatal hemochromatosis

Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is characterized by hepatic failure in the newborn period and heavy iron staining in the liver. In addition, there is marked siderosis of extrahepatic tissues, including the heart and pancreas (Driscoll et al., 1988). Whitington (2007) postulated that some cases of neonatal hemochromatosis result from maternal alloimmunity directed at the fetal liver, and therefore do not represent an inherited mendelian disorder. Other causes may result from metabolic disease or perinatal infection. In particular, he commented that the disorder is not related to the family of inherited liver diseases that fall under the classification of hereditary hemochromatosis (see, e.g., 235200). Whitington (2007) proposed the term 'congenital alloimmune hepatitis.' In the past, the disorder has loosely been labeled 'neonatal hepatitis' and 'giant cell hepatitis,' which are pathologic findings in the liver representing a common response to a variety of insults, including cholestatic disorders and infection, among others (Fawaz et al., 1975; Knisely et al., 1987; Kelly et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82768
Concept ID:
C0268059
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
Organism Attribute
11.

Neuromuscular Diseases

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. Your nerve cells, also called neurons, send the messages that control these muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between your nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, your muscles weaken and waste away. The weakness can lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include. -Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. -Multiple sclerosis. -Myasthenia gravis. -Spinal muscular atrophy. Many neuromuscular diseases are genetic, which means they run in families or there is a mutation in your genes. Sometimes, an immune system disorder can cause them. Most of them have no cure. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms, increase mobility and lengthen life.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10323
Concept ID:
C0027868
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Myopathy, centronuclear

Centronuclear myopathy is a condition characterized by muscle weakness (myopathy) and wasting (atrophy) in the skeletal muscles, which are the muscles used for movement. The severity of centronuclear myopathy varies among affected individuals, even among members of the same family.People with centronuclear myopathy begin experiencing muscle weakness at any time from birth to early adulthood. The muscle weakness slowly worsens over time and can lead to delayed development of motor skills, such as crawling or walking; muscle pain during exercise; and difficulty walking. Some affected individuals may need wheelchair assistance as the muscles atrophy and weakness becomes more severe. In rare instances, the muscle weakness improves over time.Some people with centronuclear myopathy experience mild to severe breathing problems related to the weakness of muscles needed for breathing. People with centronuclear myopathy may have droopy eyelids (ptosis) and weakness in other facial muscles, including the muscles that control eye movement. People with this condition may also have foot abnormalities, a high arch in the roof of the mouth (high-arched palate), and abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis). Rarely, individuals with centronuclear myopathy have a weakened heart muscle (cardiomyopathy), disturbances in nerve function (neuropathy), or intellectual disability.A key feature of centronuclear myopathy is the displacement of the nucleus in muscle cells, which can be viewed under a microscope. Normally the nucleus is found at the edges of the rod-shaped muscle cells, but in people with centronuclear myopathy the nucleus is located in the center of these cells. How the change in location of the nucleus affects muscle cell function is unknown.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
808086
Concept ID:
CN221282
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Myopathy, centronuclear, 1

Autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy is a congenital myopathy characterized by slowly progressive muscular weakness and wasting (Bitoun et al., 2005). The disorder involves mainly limb girdle, trunk, and neck muscles but may also affect distal muscles. Weakness may be present during childhood or adolescence or may not become evident until the third decade of life, and some affected individuals become wheelchair-bound in their fifties. Ptosis and limitation of eye movements occur frequently. The most prominent histopathologic features include high frequency of centrally located nuclei in a large number of extrafusal muscle fibers (which is the basis of the name of the disorder), radial arrangement of sarcoplasmic strands around the central nuclei, and predominance and hypotrophy of type 1 fibers. Genetic Heterogeneity of Centronuclear Myopathy Centronuclear myopathy is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. See also X-linked CNM (CNMX; 310400), caused by mutation in the MTM1 gene (300415) on chromosome Xq28; CNM2 (255200), caused by mutation in the BIN1 gene (601248) on chromosome 2q14; CNM3 (614408), caused by mutation in the MYF6 gene (159991) on chromosome 12q21; CNM4 (614807), caused by mutation in the CCDC78 gene (614666) on chromosome 16p13; and CNM5 (615959), caused by mutation in the SPEG gene (615950) on chromosome 2q36. In addition, some patients with mutation in the RYR1 gene (180901) have findings of centronuclear myopathy on skeletal muscle biopsy (see 255320). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
322437
Concept ID:
C1834558
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Congenital myopathy with fiber type disproportion

Congenital fiber-type disproportion (CFTD) is usually characterized by hypotonia and mild-to-severe generalized muscle weakness at birth or within the first year of life. Although some individuals remain non-ambulatory throughout life, many eventually develop the ability to walk. In more than 90% of affected individuals, muscle weakness is static or improves; in the remainder it is usually slowly progressive. Mild-to-severe respiratory involvement is seen in approximately 30% of affected individuals; respiratory failure may occur at any age. Ophthalmoplegia, ptosis, and facial and/or bulbar weakness with severe limb/respiratory weakness may predict a poor prognosis. Mild-to-severe feeding difficulties occur in nearly 30% of children. Contractures of the hips, knees, ankles, elbows, and fingers occur in approximately 25% and may be present at birth or occur in older persons with decreased mobility secondary to severe weakness. Spinal deformities including scoliosis, kyphoscoliosis, and lordosis are seen in 25% or more of individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
108177
Concept ID:
C0546264
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
15.

Nemaline myopathy 1

Nemaline myopathy (referred to in this entry as NM) is characterized by weakness, hypotonia, and depressed or absent deep tendon reflexes. Muscle weakness is usually most severe in the face, the neck flexors, and the proximal limb muscles. The clinical classification defines six forms of NM, which are classified by onset and severity of motor and respiratory involvement: Severe congenital (neonatal) (16% of all individuals with NM). Amish NM. Intermediate congenital (20%). Typical congenital (46%). Childhood-onset (13%). Adult-onset (late-onset) (4%). Considerable overlap occurs among the forms. There are significant differences in survival between individuals classified as having severe, intermediate, and typical congenital NM. Severe neonatal respiratory disease and the presence of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita are associated with death in the first year of life. Independent ambulation before age 18 months is predictive of survival. Most children with typical congenital NM are eventually able to walk. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
373089
Concept ID:
C1836448
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Myopathy, tubular aggregate, 2

MedGen UID:
786453
Concept ID:
CN189718
Disease or Syndrome
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