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Results: 1 to 20 of 39

1.

Gaucher disease

Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
42164
Concept ID:
C0017205
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Heterogeneous

Made up of elements or ingredients that are not alike. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
5539
Concept ID:
C0019409
3.

Gaucher's disease, type 1

Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
409531
Concept ID:
C1961835
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Thrombocytopenia

A finding based on laboratory test results that indicate a decrease in number of platelets in a blood specimen. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
52737
Concept ID:
C0040034
Finding
5.

Pain

Pain is a feeling triggered in the nervous system. Pain may be sharp or dull. It may come and go, or it may be constant. You may feel pain in one area of your body, such as your back, abdomen or chest or you may feel pain all over, such as when your muscles ache from the flu. Pain can be helpful in diagnosing a problem. Without pain, you might seriously hurt yourself without knowing it, or you might not realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain usually goes away. However, sometimes pain goes on for weeks, months or even years. This is called chronic pain. Sometimes chronic pain is due to an ongoing cause, such as cancer or arthritis. Sometimes the cause is unknown. Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain relievers, acupuncture and sometimes surgery are helpful.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
45282
Concept ID:
C0030193
Sign or Symptom
6.

Diagnosis

The process of identifying a disease, such as cancer, from its signs and symptoms. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
8354
Concept ID:
C0011900
Finding
7.

Anemia

If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough iron. Your body needs iron to make hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Anemia has three main causes: blood loss, lack of red blood cell production, and high rates of red blood cell destruction. Conditions that may lead to anemia include: -Heavy periods. -Pregnancy. -Ulcers. -Colon polyps or colon cancer. -Inherited disorders. -A diet that does not have enough iron, folic acid or vitamin B12. -Blood disorders such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, or cancer. -Aplastic anemia, a condition that can be inherited or acquired. -G6PD deficiency, a metabolic disorder. Anemia can make you feel tired, cold, dizzy, and irritable. You may be short of breath or have a headache. Your doctor will diagnose anemia with a physical exam and blood tests. Treatment depends on the kind of anemia you have. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1526
Concept ID:
C0002871
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Pain

MedGen UID:
776584
Concept ID:
C2364139
Finding
9.

Hepatosplenomegaly

Simultaneous enlargement of the liver and spleen. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504839
Concept ID:
CN001310
Finding
10.

Thrombocytopenia

MedGen UID:
472158
Concept ID:
CN130080
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Bone pain

MedGen UID:
368783
Concept ID:
C1963077
Finding
12.

Severe

A term used to describe cells that look abnormal under a microscope. These cells are more likely to grow and spread quickly than cells in low-grade cancer or in growths that may become cancer. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
104640
Concept ID:
C0205082
13.

Onset

The start, beginning, or early stages. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
87142
Concept ID:
C0332162
14.

Bone pain

Painful sensation in the bones. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
57489
Concept ID:
C0151825
Sign or Symptom
15.

Anemia

A laboratory test result which indicates decreased levels of hemoglobin in a biological specimen. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
56401
Concept ID:
C0162119
Finding
16.

Hepatosplenomegaly

An abnormal enlargement of both the liver and spleen. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
9225
Concept ID:
C0019214
Sign or Symptom
17.

Endoglycosidases

MedGen UID:
760845
Concept ID:
C3537242
Pharmacologic Substance
18.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Brain Diseases, Metabolic, Inborn

Brain disorders resulting from inborn metabolic errors, primarily from enzymatic defects which lead to substrate accumulation, product reduction, or increase in toxic metabolites through alternate pathways. The majority of these conditions are familial, however spontaneous mutation may also occur in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
156005
Concept ID:
C0752109
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Nervous System

A group of enzymatic disorders affecting the nervous system and to a variable degree the skeletal system, lymphoreticular system, and other organs. The conditions are marked by an abnormal accumulation of catabolic material within lysosomes. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
148380
Concept ID:
C0751738
Disease or Syndrome

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