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MedGen for PubMed (Select 16921174)

Items: 15

1.

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

Amyloid deposition in the walls of leptomeningeal and cortical arteries, arterioles, and less often capillaries and veins of the central nervous system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506633
Concept ID:
CN167696
Finding
2.

Dementia

A loss of global cognitive ability of sufficient amount to interfere with normal social or occupational function. Dementia represents a loss of previously present cognitive abilities, generally in adults, and can affect memory, thinking, language, judgment, and behavior. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504574
Concept ID:
CN000683
Finding
3.

Aural atresia, congenital

Altmann (1955) was the first to describe a congenital aural atresia (CAA) classification, which has been modified over the years (Cremers et al., 1988; Schuknecht, 1989; Jahrsdoerfer et al., 1992). In CAA type I, there is bony or fibrous atresia of the lateral part of the external auditory canal and an almost normal medial part and middle ear. CAA type II is the most frequent type and is characterized by partial or total aplasia of the external auditory canal. CAA type IIA involves an external auditory canal with either complete bony atresia of the medial part or partial aplasia that ends blindly in a fistula leading to a rudimentary tympanic membrane. CAA type IIB is characterized by bony stenosis of the total length of the external auditory canal. CAA type III involves bony atresia of the external auditory canal and a very small or absent middle-ear cavity (summary by Feenstra et al., 2011). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
375051
Concept ID:
C1842937
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Autosomal dominant inheritance

Autosomal dominant inheritance refers to genetic conditions that occur when a mutation is present in one copy of a given gene (i.e., the person is heterozygous). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Intellectual Product
5.

Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by dementia that typically begins with subtle and poorly recognized failure of memory and slowly becomes more severe and, eventually, incapacitating. Other common findings include confusion, poor judgment, language disturbance, agitation, withdrawal, and hallucinations. Occasionally, seizures, Parkinsonian features, increased muscle tone, myoclonus, incontinence, and mutism occur. Death usually results from general inanition, malnutrition, and pneumonia. The typical clinical duration of the disease is eight to ten years, with a range from one to 25 years. Approximately 25% of all AD is familial (i.e., =2 persons in a family have AD) of which approximately 95% is late onset (age >60-65 years) and 5% is early onset (age <65 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1853
Concept ID:
C0002395
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Vascular disorder

The vascular system is the body's network of blood vessels. It includes the arteries, veins and capillaries that carry blood to and from the heart. Problems of the vascular system are common and can be serious. Arteries can become thick and stiff, a problem called atherosclerosis. Blood clots can clog vessels and block blood flow to the heart or brain. Weakened blood vessels can burst, causing bleeding inside the body. . You are more likely to have vascular disease as you get older. Other factors that make vascular disease more likely include. - Family history of vascular or heart diseases. - Pregnancy. - Illness or injury . - Long periods of sitting or standing still. - Any condition that affects the heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol . - Smoking . - Obesity . Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
22621
Concept ID:
C0042373
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Disorder of cardiovascular system

A non-neoplastic or neoplastic disorder affecting the heart or the vessels (arteries, veins and lymph vessels). Representative examples of non-neoplastic cardiovascular disorders are endocarditis and hypertension. Representative examples of neoplastic cardiovascular disorders are endocardial myxoma and angiosarcoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
2848
Concept ID:
C0007222
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Amyloidosis

Amyloidosis occurs when abnormal proteins called amyloids build up and form deposits. The deposits can collect in organs such as the kidney and heart. This can cause the organs to become stiff and unable to work the way they should. . There are three main types of amyloidosis:. -Primary - with no known cause. -Secondary - caused by another disease, including some types of cancer. -Familial - passed down through genes. Symptoms can vary, depending upon which organs are affected. Treatment depends on the type of amyloidosis you have. The goal is to help with symptoms and limit the production of proteins. If another disease is the cause, it needs to be treated.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
272
Concept ID:
C0002726
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Alzheimer disease, early-onset, with cerebral amyloid angiopathy

MedGen UID:
400198
Concept ID:
C1863053
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy, Icelandic type

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), defined by the deposition of congophilic material in the vessels of the cortex and leptomeninges, is a major cause of intracerebral hemorrhage in the elderly (Vinters, 1987, Greenberg, 1998). Palsdottir et al. (1988) referred to the disorder in Icelandic patients as hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy (HCCAA). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
279656
Concept ID:
C1527338
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis

Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (HCHWA) describes a group of rare familial central nervous system disorders characterized by amyloid deposition in the cerebral blood vessels leading to hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic strokes, focal neurological deficits, and progressive cognitive decline eventually leading to dementia. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
831658
Concept ID:
CN206203
Finding
13.

Autosomal dominant beta2-microglobulinic amyloidosis

#946;2M) leading to progressive gastrointestinal dysfunction, Sjögren syndrome (see this term) and autonomic neuropathy. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
799187
Concept ID:
CN203779
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Early-onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease

Early-onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (EOAD) is a progressive dementia with reduction of cognitive functions. EOAD presents the same phenotype as sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) but has an early age of onset, usually before 60 years old. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
797516
Concept ID:
CN197486
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Vascular disorder: absent

MedGen UID:
776703
Concept ID:
CN184660
Finding
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