Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Results: 10

1.

rosiglitazone

The active ingredient in a drug that helps control the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood and is being studied in the prevention and treatment of some types of cancer. Rosiglitazone stops cells from growing and may prevent the growth of new blood vessels that tumors need to grow. It is a type of thiazolidinedione and a type of antiangiogenesis agent. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
129650
Concept ID:
C0289313
Pharmacologic Substance
2.

pioglitazone

A drug that is used to treat type 2 diabetes and is being studied in the prevention of head and neck cancer. It may be able to stop leukoplakia (a condition affecting the mouth ) from developing into cancer. It is a type of thiazolidinedione. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
20220
Concept ID:
C0071097
Pharmacologic Substance
3.

glimepiride

A long-acting, third-generation sulfonylurea with hypoglycemic activity. Compared to other generations of sulfonylurea compounds, glimepiride is very potent and has a longer duration of action. This agent is metabolized by CYP2C9 and shows peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonistic activity. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
16604
Concept ID:
C0061323
Pharmacologic Substance
4.

Diabetes mellitus

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes. A blood test can show if you have diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your glucose level and take medicine if prescribed. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8350
Concept ID:
C0011849
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Diabetes mellitus

A group of abnormalities characterized by hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504609
Concept ID:
CN000766
Finding
6.

SUPERNUMERARY DER(22)t(8

Carriers of the balanced constitutional translocation t(8;22)(q24.13;q11.2) are phenotypically normal but are at risk of having progeny with supernumerary der(22)t(8;22) syndrome as a result of malsegregation of the der(22). Although the supernumerary der(22)t(8;22) phenotype is variable between individuals, it tends to include ear and extremity abnormalities in addition to mild mental retardation (summary by Sheridan et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462316
Concept ID:
C3150966
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Emanuel syndrome

Emanuel syndrome is characterized by severe intellectual disability, microcephaly, failure to thrive, preauricular tags or pits, ear anomalies, cleft or high-arched palate, micrognathia, kidney abnormalities, congenital heart defects, and genital abnormalities in males. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
323030
Concept ID:
C1836929
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Metabolic syndrome X

A clustering of abdominal obesity, high triglycerides, low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), high blood pressure, and elevated fasting glucose levels is sometimes called metabolic syndrome X (Reaven, 1988) or abdominal obesity-metabolic syndrome (Bjorntorp, 1991). The syndrome may affect nearly 1 in 4 U.S. adults and is considered a veritable epidemic (Ford et al., 2002). It is a major risk factor for both diabetes mellitus (see 125853 and Haffner et al., 1992) and cardiovascular disease (Isomaa et al., 2001). The etiology is complex, determined by the interplay of both genetic and environmental factors. The prevalence varies substantially among ethnic groups, with the highest rates in Mexican American women (Park et al., 2003). Other factors influencing the metabolic syndrome include age, smoking, alcohol, diet, and physical inactivity. Genetic Heterogeneity of Abdominal Obesity-Metabolic Syndrome AOMS2 (605572) has been mapped to chromosome 17p12. AOMS3 (615812) is caused by mutation in the DYRK1B gene (604556) on chromosome 19q13. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
99356
Concept ID:
C0524620
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Diabetes mellitus type 2

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly. Some people do not notice symptoms at all. The symptoms can include: -Being very thirsty. -Urinating often. -Feeling very hungry or tired. -Losing weight without trying. -Having sores that heal slowly. -Having blurry eyesight. A blood test can show if you have diabetes. Many people can manage their diabetes through healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing. Some people also need to take diabetes medicines. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
41523
Concept ID:
C0011860
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
350352

Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...